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Discussion Starter #1
I bought a house. Half the basement is going to be my machine/light fab shop. It's a walk in basement with 8ft ceilings so it should be fine for my uses. Yes, I will be taking my own advice from the other tiny machine shop thread and installing a two axis gantry crane in the ceiling.

There's a garage on the property for doing heavier fabrication and parking/working on vehicles.


Right now there's no pics, no measurements, no napkin drawings, no nothing yet. I closed 2wk ago but my rend is paid through May and I've been too busy to even go to the property. My girlfriend was there with her friends. Supposedly they cleaned and did some painting. I don't know. I haven't been there yet :laughing:


I'll edit this post with pictures when I get them, probably in 2wk or so.

I'm patient and a cheapskate so if you're expecting to see me run out and buy expensive shit in order to get stuff done ASAP then this thread will fail to meet your expectations. :flipoff2:

This thread will be where I ask questions and post pictures of progress.
 

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Title should have been "hey guys, just bought a house, thought I'd let you know" :flipoff2:

Looking forward to it. How large is the basement half you're going to use?
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Today's question is going to be about a wall in the basement.

The plan is to stick a wall under the main beam to keep laundry, storage and utilities side of the basement free from contamination from the shop side.

The wall will be a typical 2x4 wall, 16" on center.

The plan is pressure treated 2x4 sill anchored to the floor with bolts and concrete anchors.

The columns under the main beam are on 2ft square pads that were poured separately from the basement floor. They are flat. The basement floor between those pads is not flat between.

While I'm sure I could just suck the 2x4 down with the concrete anchors I'm pretty sure that's not the "right" way to do it. :laughing:

What is the "right" way to deal with that?
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Title should have been "hey guys, just bought a house, thought I'd let you know" :flipoff2:

Looking forward to it. How large is the basement half you're going to use?
The area I get is 14' x 28'.

The laundry is currently where the sewer pipe is. The future location (pictured) will put it where the water comes into the house. If it doesn't go there it goes under the stairs.

The little room where the oil tank is is going to become my paint/chemical storage.

The door to the rest of the basement will be between the chimney and the oil tank room. If I build a welding table/workbench to fit the corner of the shop between the outside door and the door to the basement then I can work on two sides of the table because the left would need to stay clear to access the door. That also makes ventilation is easy to solve.

The doorway opens onto a paved walkway and then 10ft later my driveway. That should make working with long stock really convenient.
 

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Overall plan looks good!!

Today's question is going to be about a wall in the basement.

The plan is to stick a wall under the main beam to keep laundry, storage and utilities side of the basement free from contamination from the shop side.

The wall will be a typical 2x4 wall, 16" on center.

The plan is pressure treated 2x4 sill anchored to the floor with bolts and concrete anchors.

The columns under the main beam are on 2ft square pads that were poured separately from the basement floor. They are flat. The basement floor between those pads is not flat between.

While I'm sure I could just suck the 2x4 down with the concrete anchors I'm pretty sure that's not the "right" way to do it. :laughing:

What is the "right" way to deal with that?
How far off from flat is the area we're talking about? 1/8"-1/2" or more than that?

Depending how far off it is, I'd look into shimming, but if it's not off by much, then you can fasten the sill and build the wall in place, since all your studs will be a slightly different length.
 

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While I'm sure I could just suck the 2x4 down with the concrete anchors I'm pretty sure that's not the "right" way to do it. :laughing:

What is the "right" way to deal with that?
Who the fuck cares? You're a homeowner now! Do it however you want :flipoff2:

Pretty sure screwys done worse... and been paid for it!
 

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Who the fuck cares? You're a homeowner now! Do it however you want :flipoff2:

Pretty sure screwys done worse... and been paid for it!
This. I moved into my first place the first weekend this month and have been working on shit every day after I get home. Cutting holes in your own place is awesomely rewarding.
 

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gumboot cloggeroo
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First, I don't think you're really supposed to use PT wood indoors, not that I really care.

When I built my giant sauna/shower/bathroom in my basement, I bought a piece of that plastic deck board shit, and I ripped it to the width of a 2x4 and used it as my bottom plate of the wall. I didn't want to do all that goddam work with the tiles and rock and have the fukin wood rot where it touched the concrete floor.

I've also used conveyor belt as a shim/spacer/whatever to keep wood from touching concrete floor.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
First, I don't think you're really supposed to use PT wood indoors, not that I really care.

When I built my giant sauna/shower/bathroom in my basement, I bought a piece of that plastic deck board shit, and I ripped it to the width of a 2x4 and used it as my bottom plate of the wall. I didn't want to do all that goddam work with the tiles and rock and have the fukin wood rot where it touched the concrete floor.

I've also used conveyor belt as a shim/spacer/whatever to keep wood from touching concrete floor.
I thought the whole point of doing PT sills on concrete was that it won't rot :confused:
 

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gumboot cloggeroo
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I thought the whole point of doing PT sills on concrete was that it won't rot :confused:
PT still rots eventually, but rubber or plastic last much, much longer.

I'm certainly no expert, it's just what I've done in the past....YMMV.
 

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First, I don't think you're really supposed to use PT wood indoors, not that I really care.
Every wall I have ever built or seen in a newer house has PT where it touches concrete. I do like getting a dryer piece or letting it air dry some before putting it down

Similar to my build, but over 2x as big :flipoff2::flipoff2::flipoff2:
 

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Discussion Starter #15
After looking at where everything is and how nice the bar is I'm gonna take the right half of the basement as the shop instead of the top half I'll scan my napkin sketches and cave paintings of the new layout and post them sometime this week.

I'm gonna have a 28" deep shelf/work bench spanning the entire short side of the shop by the drawer. Under it will be 2-drawer file cabinets on wheels. I've successfully done this in my current work space.

I picked up an Airco 180A AC stick welder last week for $100 and dropped it at the house today. I also bought the parts needed to convert it to DC which will arrive from China sometime this summer.

I bought another HF engine hoist and assembled it at the house.

The girlfriend it really taking the lead on getting the house portion of things sorted out which is nice.

The girlfriend's car broke down today, crank but no start. It wants to go. If I didn't know better (and if it didn't start just fine an hour before to change parking spots) I'd say it had super low compression. I'm thinking the timing belt slipped a tooth. I don't know if it was ever done but it's a non interference engine so I don't really give a fuck.

It broke down parked in front of our new house so I'm just gonna push it into the garage with the identical shitbox and roll from there. Now that I have a garage to wrench on my shit in I'm really living the high life. We both drive the same car so I'll just buy another one for $1k or so if it turns out something is really fucked.
 

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An easy way to deal with uneven floors or sills is use non-shrinking grout under the sill plate. Fasten the sill plate down with wedge bolt anchors with a few shims as needed to have a level or even sill. Mix up some grout and push it in with a pointing trowel. More important with a bearing wall where even load distribution is key. In your case, I'd consider taking a power plane and getting the profile close to the shape the plate is resting on and shoot it down with powder actuated nails. If it's not parallel to the ceiling, I'd cut each stud to fit individually as required.
 

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Before you buy materials...

Apart from what others have recommended with regards to the walls, would it be handy later on, to make big swing-able gate partitions instead of imovable walls throughout?

Rubber flaps on bottom to seal?

Just a thought that might even inspire another :idea:
 

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Discussion Starter #18
Before you buy materials...

Apart from what others have recommended with regards to the walls, would it be handy later on, to make big swing-able gate partitions instead of imovable walls throughout?

Rubber flaps on bottom to seal?

Just a thought that might even inspire another :idea:
Too many columns and stuff to swing around. Dust would go over the tops between the floor joists. Not practical in my situation.
 

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Discussion Starter #19
Ok, so about that wall. I've figured out the sill but still got some questions on the top plate.

Sill will be anchored 1/4x2-3/4 concrete screws countersunk ~1/2" (measured with my depth eyecrometer). Screws will be spaced about every 8" (two between each stud) on alternating sides of the sill plate.

I know that's overkill but with the amount of work that gets done down here it's only a matter of time until a 1/4-ton metal object rolls into it fairly hard and it's foreseeable that I may want to mount heavy-ish appliances and/or shelving to it in the future so I want this wall secure.

This wall is going to run under a floor joist for it's entire length except where it will go down around the main beam. The joist is 2" wide so I'll have 1.5" of 2x4 hanging over on one side.

I'm thinking of using L-channel plates on the side where the top plate is not flush with the joist and using rafter to top plate braces on the side not flush with the joist. I'm going to use ones that are smaller/cheaper than the ones pictured but you get the idea.

Does that seem appropriate?
 

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Personally I'd say you're overbuilding it, but if you're willing to buy the shit and do the work, have at it. You'll be able to hang stock on that wall by the time you're done :laughing:
 
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