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Discussion Starter #1
Here's some good info on green stickers.. I'll add in more over the next week or so.

Cost to you for a Green Sticker is $25 bucks, for two years.
That's what, the cost of an oil change? A modest dinner out? A tank of gas?

I'm no fan of extra taxes, even when they are disguised as fees, but for $25, I'll just pay it and move on...

Randii
 

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Discussion Starter #2
Some info borrowed from the good guys down south: the San Diego Off-Road Coalition
http://www.sdorc.org/faq.html

Q: Where do green sticker fees go?
A: Since 1971, California has invested more than $275 million OHV enthusiast-generated dollars for acquisition, development and maintenance of OHV State Vehicular Riding Areas (SVRA). This money is also used for the construction and maintenance of facilities for OHV recreation on local, state and federal lands. This fund is administered by the California Off-Highway Motor Vehicle Recreation (OHMVR) Division, part of the Department of Parks and Recreation, and the OHMVR Commission.

The "green sticker" registration fee of $21 is paid every two years for each off-highway vehicle using public lands. Seven dollars goes to the DMV for administration costs, two dollars goes to the highway patrol, four dollars goes to the In-lieu gas tax fund and the remaining eight dollars goes to the OHV program.

More than 1/3 of the OHV program funds are dedicated to natural resources and conservation. Another 1/3 of the funds support the seven SVRA's. They are: Carnegie; Hollister Hills; Prairie City; Oceano Dunes; Hungry Valley; Clay Pit and Ocotillo Wells.

The final 1/3 is awarded to federal, state and local agencies through the grant program. An example of this is the El Centro BLM which manages the Imperial Sand Dunes Riding Area and most of the rest of the San Diego and Imperial County desert area. Over the past 13 years they have received $11,322,000 in grant monies to provide OHV opportunity on the BLM public lands.
 

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reg for non street legal rigs (bdirtbikes/quads/etc.) can touch pavement and some trails are limited to street legal only.
 

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so i take it a green sticker for my 86 bronco wont make it legal to drive on the road
 

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rokdog03 said:
so i take it a green sticker for my 86 bronco wont make it legal to drive on the road
not in cali ... cant even be flat towed
 

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Ref. back to the Prairie City Rangers thread, can you, legally, in Cali, both plate and green-sticker the same vehicle?

Are one state's green stickers given equivalent accord as license plates? (can I ride in Cali on Colo stickers, or do I have to get Cali stickers?)

I tried a little while back to green-sticker my (plated) buggy, and got handed a bunch of hoops to jump through, to the point that it didn't really seem worth bothering.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Some folks have clearly done plate AND green sticker dual registration, but we're waiting on final info from the OHV Division, and simultaneously, taking steps to document a clear, *repeatable* process that folks can use when they go to the California DMV.

Out-of-staters need to get a 'Non-Resident OHV Permit' (available in CA, AZ, or NV) to play at the SVRAs, unless it is a closed-course competition.
http://ohv.parks.ca.gov/default.asp?page_id=21846

Here's another more general information page:
http://ohv.parks.ca.gov/default.asp?page_id=1234

Randii
 

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Yep its cheaper, but I think the money really goes to the Rubicon type cops and there four wheelers. What do you really think happens with um-teen thousands of dollars? Yeah the trash gets picked up..... but come awn! Oh well I guess..... as long as I can wheel, I'll pay the stickin $25 bucks. I went out to Sushi the other night with my chick and it was $53 :eek: $25 for 2 years.... uh yeah I can handle that :D
 

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whitebrowithafro said:
I went out to Sushi the other night with my chick and it was $53 :eek: $25 for 2 years.... uh yeah I can handle that :D
Must have been a cheap Sushi place or your didn't eat anything. :grinpimp:
 

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A street legal license plate vehicle is legal to drive anywhere a green sticker vehicle is allowed to legally operate. If you are driving trails outside your home state, a street legal license plate is your best choice to remain legal on any trail. A vehicle with a street legal license plate is considered a Street-Legal-Vehicle (or SLV). An SLV is legal on any established highway or recognized Off-Highway route of travel wider than 50 inches in width (routes less than 50 inches are ATV, motorcycle, and snowmobile only routes).

A green sticker is a registration for non-street-legal Off-Highway-Vehicles (OHV's). There is no need to green sticker register a vehicle with a street legal license plate, because it's already legal everywhere an OHV can legally travel. Take the money you were going to spend on the redundant green sticker and give it to CA4WDC, UFWDA, FOTR, CORVA, ASA, USA-ALL, FOPV, SDORC, or your local club (make it work for you locally, in hands you trust).

A green sticker registered OHV is only legal to drive on designated OHV routes of travel. The pavement between the improved campground and the trailhead is not always designated as legal for OHV's (and do not let a Ranger looking the other way fool you into thinking it is legal). Most OHV trail systems (outside of State Vehicle Recreation Areas and Designated "Open"-Use Areas) do not feature connected OHV routes. Many are assembled of OHV route sections, separated by Street-Legal-Vehicle Only connections.

What does a Green Sticker registration offer that a SLV registration does not offer?

1. An unlicensed minor is legal to drive an OHV on designated OHV routes of travel. An unlicensed minor driving a SLV, even on an OHV route, is an unlicensed driver subject to a potential fine. If you want your children to legally enjoy driving, the OHV registration has an advantage.

2. Equipment standards for an OHV are less stringent than that for a SLV. The OHV does not require working turn signals, horn, lights, and wipers, nor does it need a windshield, mudflaps, or an intact emissions control system. A SLV can get a ticket for an equipment violation, even when on an OHV route, for items that the OHV is legal to ignore and still operate within the law. If your vehicle is not exactly street legal, the OHV registration has an advantage.

The killjoy to an OHV registration is the limitations on where you can legally drive. In 1970 (the first year of the Green Sticker registration program) you could legally drive your OHV on any road or trail not specifically posted closed to OHV's. You had to avoid places like paved highways, freeways, most National Park hiking trails and all major connected hiking trails (the AT & PCT), and in designated Wilderness, but nearly every dirt road or trail was a legal OHV route of travel.

This vast opportunity to legally drive an OHV begin changing in 1972 by an Executive Order (Nixon) to close National Parks to OHV's, except snowmobiles and on designated OHV routes. More changes occurred since 1972 restricting vast tracts of land to legal OHV travel: Acts of Congress establishing Conservation Areas and Wilderness Areas and converting National Monuments into National Parks, the Federal Land Planning Management Act (FLPMA of 1976) that established "closed", "limited" and "open" area route designations, and Executive Orders restricting OHV use in Roadless Areas and BLM lands.

In California alone (where the Green Sticker program was established with cooperation of the Sierra Club and Motorized Enthusiast organizations to expand managed OHV opportunity) the legal OHV driving opportunity has been reduced on over 10,000,000 square acres of land, since the National Parks were closed to OHV's in 1972. 7.2 million acres of desert were closed to OHV's with the passage of the Desert Protection Act, S21 in 1991, in one Act of Congress.

The Green Sticker (and the Red Sticker for motorcycles) has a few advantages, but these advantages come with serious limitations on the opportunity for OHV legal routes of travel and OHV legal "Open" travel areas.

Many people have advocated a nationwide OHV route system, much like the AT and PCT hiking trails. Unfortunately, since 1970 when the Green Sticker program was established many sections of potential Mexico to Oregon legal OHV routes have been designated as Wilderness (and even more are threatened by the various recent Boxer Wilderness Bills), and many more have been purchased by preservationist organizations (The Nature and Wildlands Conservancies, and private owners who have signed conservation easements excluding motorized travel). The expansion of Wildlands Project driven endangered species protection Areas of Critical Environmental Concern (ACEC's) and Sensitive Habitat areas have further limited the potential routes of travel available to complete a connected OHV route system.

What is difficult to understand is that even as the OHV opportunity has been systematically eliminated (as the Greens have essentially won the land battle), the preservation activists have not backed down but have refocused their efforts to change the perception of acceptable OHV impacts (to regulate and eventually eliminate OHV use on the few legal routes and open areas left to enjoy today). We may still have OHV open areas like Johnson Valley in twenty years, but spinning tires on the rocks may be illegal (and the objections of the Nevada BLM regarding this in competition should convince everyone this challenge to legal SLV/OHV impacts is a real threat to motorized off-road recreation). We can back down every time a new regulation is proposed on OHV legal routes and lands, just like we backed away from every relocation of the closure gate since 1972, or we can fight oppressive interpretation of what should be acceptable and legal OHV impacts and protect not only the legal land available but the legal conduct available to our grandchildren.

Does this long march to eliminate motors in the wilds make it more sensible to take your potential redundant Green Sticker registration dollars and redirect it to activist motorized recreation organizations, to fight the closures and regulations?

Happy Trails!
 

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I just got my sticker in the mail, 25 bucks is no big deal to me.
 

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Discussion Starter #16
Ed A. Stevens said:
A street legal license plate vehicle is legal to drive anywhere a green sticker vehicle is allowed to legally operate.
Let me emphasize something Ed said here, STREET LEGAL and LICENSE PLATE. Here in California, with the burden of our Califorinia Vehicle Code, you can have the plate, and still not be street-legal -- these are two very separate concepts. You've gotta be street legal AND have the plate if you want to avoid worrying about enforcement.

If your rig is NOT STREET LEGAL but has a license plate, you can apparently dual-register it as an OHV and get a green sticker, to avoid worrying about enforcement... or you can wait for the SVRA to clarify what their enforcement plan is for Prairie City, and perhaps they'll relax the rules within the fence-line.

If your rig is ONLY green-stickered, then look to the limits on OHV travel that Ed posted above.

I agree with Ed that not everyone needs a street registration and a green sticker... but the folks that aren't street legal (blame the Vehicle Code, not the Rangers!) may elect to limit their risk of being ticketed by purchasing both...

Randii
 

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I green stickered my Jeep (dual registration) back when the language regarding the Adventure Pass stated that the requirement for a pass did not apply to green stickered vehicles. That language has apparently changed. I'll still make the case to any ranger that confronts me about my lack of a pass that the Jeep has a green sticker. So far I haven't been hassled and I have never purchased a pass.
 

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[Quoted by Randii] Out-of-staters need to get a 'Non-Resident OHV Permit' (available in CA, AZ, or NV) to play at the SVRAs, unless it is a closed-course competition.

Ca recognizes valid out of state ohv registration. The Non-Resident sticker is for people from states that dont have a program such as Nevada, but we are working on one here now.
 
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