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First off I have searched and searched about this. Then the star ran out. So now that I am getting ready to start on this project I am gonna ask for some advise.

I am planning to (triangulated) 4 link the rear of my YJ, and go for about 106" WB with 47's. I have NEVER done something like this and have help, but all I know is what I have read on here over the years. When figuring where to place the link mounts, it is correct that the links need to be as horizontal as possible, and to fab in extra holes for adjustments. Does it matter how far apart the links are where they mount to the outside of the axle, and skid crossmember? I am using a BTF link mount on top of the axle and at the skid plate crossmember. Just need to figure out about where to mount the other ends on the outside.

I did post this in the newbie since I have no clue as to what I am doing. But if you must flame away.

TIA
 

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4 link

You will want to have the link mounts comming from the center of the axle to the frame rails and then the links from the ends of the axle go to the center of your frame to your BTF brackets. That is the setup I see lots of people running. I know poly performance has some good kits for the YJs.
 

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There are no simple answers in multi-link suspension design, but let me offer a few things to consider to get you started:

When you talk about links being horizontal, what you are actually talking about is selecting your IC (Instant Center) for the suspension. The imaginary lines that extend from the upper and lower links and eventually intersect at a point in space. The instant center establishes your suspension's AS (Anti-Squat) characteristics....which is why it matters so much. Being "horizontal" really isn't a complete answer, because you also need to factor in the angle of your other links, your overall wheelbase, and a few other things before you really have the full picture.

The converging links should be as far apart as you can make them (non-converged end) since this is what locates and centers your axle under the truck and keeps it there. The parallel links only maintain axle position front-to-rear, not laterally.

Link separation on the axle is important because it determines how much leverage the axle will exert on the links themselves when torque is applied. The shorter these distances are, the less effective they will be at preventing the axle from rotating under power, and the STRONGER the link ends will need to be to prevent breaking them. Often times, if you have flexibility in your design and can increase the link separation distances effectively, you can use smaller (and cheaper!) heims. What might have required a 1.25" heim, could potentially be just as strong with a 3/4" heim with better link separation.

No simple answers I'm afraid...but the beauty of link suspensions is that once you understand all of the parameters at work, you can fine-tune your design to give the specific performance you want, and make only the compromises you find acceptable.
 
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