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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
A few weeks ago a Brother of mine comes to me and says "I've got a problem with a gun". He was building a 10/22 for whatever purposes and had a friend who "knew" how to glass bed an action. Well it turns out that he didn't know WTF he was doing or just didn't care. Jack brought the rifle to me Monday afternoon and what a mess it was! Adam's and Bennet Match Bull barrel, tri colored thumbhole stock (unfinished) etc. A heck of a start on a plinker of a 10/22. Well this thing was completely, completely FUBAR'd. It was literally glued into the stock, from one end to the other with epoxy/acraglass everywhere. On top of the receiver and everything. The screw that holds the barreled action into the stock was also glued in place and the guy tried to drill it out. He drilled nearly straight down on it leaving about 20% of the side of the screw's head in place. A second drill hole was about 3/8" off to the left and stopped once it hit something brass (Later discovered that it was an insert into the stock to apply even pressure from the screw head to the stock). The guy handed Jack his gun back and said "Sorry man".

I told him I'd see what I could do for him, but most likely the stock was shot, we'd see about the action later. I was right, the stock ended up in a 2 large pieces and a number of smaller pieces, the A&B barrel was scratched in a few places where I had to use a razor knife to separate the barrel from the stock. Before you ask "Why did you do that?" let me explain. The guy says he applied this acraglass with a tongue depressor, but I think he used a putty knife. At the very front of the stock under the barrel there was 'glass above and below the blue tape he applied. I'm not sure what the blue tape was for as there wasn't much of it. I think he was trying to keep glass off the metal.

I ended up taking a back saw and cutting the stock at the front of the action leaving a light scuff through the 3rd digit in the serial number from the top of the receiver to the bottom, purely cosmetic as it only scratched the anodizing. The other side it cut a little deeper. :( I managed to free the barrel and action from the stock and was able to get a look at what was left. An absolute mess.

Picture a 10/22 receiver (I had never seen one out of a stock before) and now imagine it entirely coated in resin. Nearly 1/4" thick at the back! It was around both sides and on pretty thick near the bottom. Peering inside I figured out why the gun would not fire...resin had infiltrated a rather sizable hole and there was a hardened bubble inside the action encompassing at least one spring and impeding the movement of another part. The hole that is in the back of the receiver, where the hammer spring goes was completely full of resin as well. I could not tell where the hole was from the outside and could not get the dremel inside of the action to remove that glob of junk, nor could I drift the pins out at that time as they were covered in epoxy. I ended up using a dremel tool with an engraving cutter bit trying to mill that junk off. It would have been nice to have had a mill (and if I knew how to use it). Anyhow, there I was, dremeling away on this chunk of glass with an action inside, finally managing to clear the right side. I scuffed it up a few times but functionally it was still fine.

With all of that crap gone I drifted the pins out and cleaned as much as I could possibly do without ruining the action. Keep in mind that there is still a thin coat of junk on the action, it looks like a cross between a leper and a peeling sunburn. I peel it off as I go, but it's not my primary focus. Having reassembled the trigger group I moved onto the bolt and surrounding area...not as bad, but still a mess. There was epoxy from the breech to the back of the bolt, down both rails/channels that the bolt rides in. I managed to get most of it out with toothpicks and carb cleaner. I reassembled everything for a functions check and it all *seems* to work just fine. I'll be returning it to its owner tonight so hopefully he'll get another stock and let me know how it is.

I will post pics on my site and provide a link later tonight. The moral of this story though is not everyone that "knows what they're doing" does.
 

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The guy handed Jack his gun back and said "Sorry man".
The guy would be buying me a new gun or something bad would happen to his car/home
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
The guy would be buying me a new gun or something bad would happen to his car/home
Even my wife looked at the gun and said "WTF?!" She kept saying it every time she came to check on it's progress. Honestly I felt bad for Jack and bad about scuffing the gun up, but HTF else do you extract it from something like that? I'm not messing with MEK. I agree that the guy should have bought Jack a new gun at the very least.
 

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Friends don`t let "Friends", work on their guns. Especially when they know they`re not qualified to do so. It`s a bitch but really his own fault. I would hope brother learned a lesson. I`d hit a gun show and find a factory stock to slap on it and off the thing.
 

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Friends don`t let "Friends", work on their guns. Especially when they know they`re not qualified to do so. It`s a bitch but really his own fault. I would hope brother learned a lesson. I`d hit a gun show and find a factory stock to slap on it and off the thing.
Also an FFL in hand doesn't make one a smith.
I have turned away a number of people because I don't know their weapons.
I am actually getting my own M1, M1 Carbine, and M14 so I can tinker on those before working on a customers.
 

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wow, tell your bro to sack up and get some replacement parts from the original idiot :eek:
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
4x401cj,

Jack took him at his word. Caveat Emptor.

He asked if I knew how to glass bed it for him, I told him flat out that I didn't know WTF I was doing and had never done one before. Hopefully he's learned his lesson and it was only with a 10/22 rather than a more expensive gun. I don't know if he tried to get a replacement stock for the other guy or is just calling it a loss.
 

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Also an FFL in hand doesn't make one a smith.
I have turned away a number of people because I don't know their weapons.
I am actually getting my own M1, M1 Carbine, and M14 so I can tinker on those before working on a customers.
Good plan for everyone! You get guns AND experience:D
 

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Why would you glass bed a 10/22 anyhow? Tha accuracy gain would be hardly noticable in a .22 rimfire. There is not enough recoil to cause any movement in the stock. Just my 2 cent question
 

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Why would you glass bed a 10/22 anyhow? Tha accuracy gain would be hardly noticable in a .22 rimfire. There is not enough recoil to cause any movement in the stock. Just my 2 cent question
Recoil is but one factor.

For anyone who as spent time in the sun at a range, and their guns warms up...they might notice a difference in their shot placement and their point of aim. If not, then they got lucky.

Temperature, humidity levels, force exerted by the action/barrel lug screws (different manufactures...different modes of attachment), etc. are some other factors to consider when bedding the "lowly" plinker.

You would be thoroughly surprised how many people install a Bull bbl, glass bed the action (with/without pillars) and few inch or so of the bbl, polish the sear or install a Kidd, and add 15lb benchrest stocks to their 10/22 "plinker."

Personally, unless I was a dedicated caliper hunter, I wouldn't feel the need to bed a bolt gun, much less a semi-auto. But, just as some people tinker to get 4 more units of horsepower.....there are rimfire shooters who strive for .02" smaller groupings.
 

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If only he had applied the release agent :laughing:

Benchrest shooters will glue their action and stock together with that stuff to make them as ridgid as possible.

Chipping is the only way I know of to remove that stuff. Sand the residue off and re-anodize or just paint the reciever to get rid of the scratches.

Be careful with the chisel as it is aluminum...
 

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Chipping is the only way I know of to remove that stuff. Sand the residue off and re-anodize or just paint the reciever to get rid of the scratches.
I've seen one separation where the "customizer":shaking: froze the entire rifle for a day or so in a chest freezer. Then, he grabbed the barrel (upside down, trigger pointing up) and swung the top of the butt onto the carpet (like you would swing an axe). It broke free the first time.

If people don't have the $$$ release agent, clear shoe polish, maybe even dark polish?, will work just as well.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Recoil is but one factor.

For anyone who as spent time in the sun at a range, and their guns warms up...they might notice a difference in their shot placement and their point of aim. If not, then they got lucky.

Temperature, humidity levels, force exerted by the action/barrel lug screws (different manufactures...different modes of attachment), etc. are some other factors to consider when bedding the "lowly" plinker.

You would be thoroughly surprised how many people install a Bull bbl, glass bed the action (with/without pillars) and few inch or so of the bbl, polish the sear or install a Kidd, and add 15lb benchrest stocks to their 10/22 "plinker."

Personally, unless I was a dedicated caliper hunter, I wouldn't feel the need to bed a bolt gun, much less a semi-auto. But, just as some people tinker to get 4 more units of horsepower.....there are rimfire shooters who strive for .02" smaller groupings.
Some people have more $ in 10/22's than many people here have in their rigs. I shit you not. This one was to be built as a "150 yard" gun. Makes no difference to me, it's his gun.

If only he had applied the release agent :laughing:

Benchrest shooters will glue their action and stock together with that stuff to make them as ridgid as possible.

Chipping is the only way I know of to remove that stuff. Sand the residue off and re-anodize or just paint the reciever to get rid of the scratches.

Be careful with the chisel as it is aluminum...
Yes, that release agent would have been the key, but go to the link below and look, even that might not have helped. I need to resize and post a pic of the bbl in the stock. I used a razor knife to get a bunch of it off and then used a dremel to "mill' out the thick shit. I felt bad for scratching the shit out of the finish, but whatever, it's functional now.

Here's a link to my site with pics.
http://www.black-rifles.com/forums/index.php?showtopic=21701
 

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Some people have more $ in 10/22's than many people here have in their rigs. I shit you not. This one was to be built as a "150 yard" gun. Makes no difference to me, it's his gun.



Yes, that release agent would have been the key, but go to the link below and look, even that might not have helped. I need to resize and post a pic of the bbl in the stock. I used a razor knife to get a bunch of it off and then used a dremel to "mill' out the thick shit. I felt bad for scratching the shit out of the finish, but whatever, it's functional now.

Here's a link to my site with pics.
http://www.black-rifles.com/forums/index.php?showtopic=21701
You did a great job getting the epoxy off of it imho. Some sanding and quality black paint will make it look like new or you can do like I did and sand the black off and polish the aluminum reciever.

The guy that did that should pay for the damages at the very least...
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
Thanks. I added a few more pictures to that post to better show what happened to that poor innocent 10/22. It got gentley caressed/surprize sex from a stranger.
 

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I'd be interested in the advantage of glassing a .22 especially with a material like Accuraglas that when put in the wrong hands is the debil incarnate...

It expands when cured so the amount that "looks" proper while wet is usually too much....

The gel form becomes more liquid as it warms during curing tending to flow to areas where its not wanted...

Iffen one fails to mask areas that the materal is not supposed go go into there is great gnashing of teeth when one discovers that it will literally glue anything to anything...

Yep we learned about it on our own hardware. Fortunately not as badly as the 1st posters observations... :shaking: :D

D.
 

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I'd be interested in the advantage of glassing a .22 especially with a material like Accuraglas that when put in the wrong hands is the debil incarnate...

It expands when cured so the amount that "looks" proper while wet is usually too much....

The gel form becomes more liquid as it warms during curing tending to flow to areas where its not wanted...

Iffen one fails to mask areas that the materal is not supposed go go into there is great gnashing of teeth when one discovers that it will literally glue anything to anything...

Yep we learned about it on our own hardware. Fortunately not as badly as the 1st posters observations... :shaking: :D

D.

I have bedded multiple rifles with the acraglass gel and never had any of the issues you mentioned:confused:
 
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