Pirate 4x4 banner

61 - 78 of 78 Posts

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
69,483 Posts
Umm, no. Blow in their face. It works. Every. Single. Time.
Did not know.

They grow out of the silent screaming. The other stuff, not necessarily.
I WISH my daughter had had the silent scream. Little girls are ear piercing! Half the time they do it just to hear themselves.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
201 Posts
Our middle child did this at around age 2 Whenever he got hurt or scarred he would cry until he passed out. Usually within a minute of the cry starting. He grew out of it after about a year. But during that year we spent quite a bit seeing neurologist and other specialists to be told they couldn't find anything wrong.

I have sympathy for you and your wife. Even after all the test being negative. It still was frustrating, upsetting, and would pull at the heart any time it would happen. But I do have to say it was interesting watching others react when they see your kid run up to you crying only to be picked up and then shortly passing out in your arms. Or having friends or family pick up the kid and he would pass out on them.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,168 Posts
Yes... I used to do it to my son when he'd be crying and wouldn't stop... If you blow a puff of air in their face it will make them gulp in some air. Hell I'd even do it when he was just starting to cry so he would calm his shit. :laughing:
Hehe... Awesome. I used to do this too. The kids would get all worked up and I'd blow in their faces to shock them into chilling out. It drove my wife crazy, but it totally worked. They'd stop and gasp, and I'd say, "Are you finished yet?" It would make them cry harder sometimes, but they'd stop eventually when they figured out that I could outlast them. Tough love, but it's better than beating a child.

A word of advice... This doesn't usually work well with the wife, although it does work. She'll start carrying on, and although blowing in her face will shock her into being quiet initially, she'll usually just blow up more. If you're patient and stick to your plan however, you'll reach a point where she'll become completely quiet and won't speak at all. It usually lasts for a few days, so it technically works with 100% effectiveness if you hang in there.

There may be some side effects though. Some guys may experience sore backs from sleeping on the couch, and weight loss from making their own meals. I haven't had those issues, but they are potential issues in many cases.

__
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,073 Posts
Hehe... Awesome. I used to do this too. The kids would get all worked up and I'd blow in their faces to shock them into chilling out. It drove my wife crazy, but it totally worked. They'd stop and gasp, and I'd say, "Are you finished yet?" It would make them cry harder sometimes, but they'd stop eventually when they figured out that I could outlast them. Tough love, but it's better than beating a child.

A word of advice... This doesn't usually work well with the wife, although it does work. She'll start carrying on, and although blowing in her face will shock her into being quiet initially, she'll usually just blow up more. If you're patient and stick to your plan however, you'll reach a point where she'll become completely quiet and won't speak at all. It usually lasts for a few days, so it technically works with 100% effectiveness if you hang in there.

There may be some side effects though. Some guys may experience sore backs from sleeping on the couch, and weight loss from making their own meals. I haven't had those issues, but they are potential issues in many cases.

__
You sir have been awarded 2 internets:laughing::laughing:you also won this thread:laughing:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,700 Posts
I did not read all the replies.

My first did what you describe, and my wife has worked several years with kids 6 and under that have done the same thing.

A sharp puff of air or two straight in the face while telling them to breathe usually does the trick. My wife has had a few kids that took better to a spray bottle of water misted in the face. Sometimes she would make a loud noise by dropping a book on the floor or slamming a door or something. Whatever it takes to snap that child out of the not breathing thing.

It is very scary when your own kid does this. It is a whole other thing when other people's kids you are responsible for are passing out from holding their breath. It is not a good situation, and my wife avoids it if at all possible.

My wife says that they usually stop doing it (grow out of it), but she has seen kids do it all the way into and through elementary school before. Hopefully that is not the case for you. Best of luck!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,557 Posts
Have not read the replies, but I have dealt with this. It was a (medical?) problem with my cousins (all in same family) and it killed one of them. He was young - under 5, I think. He was upset that dad didn't take him with him on the tractor into the fields, so he stood crying and holding his breath. The gate swung shut and knocked him face down into the mud, where he lay crying and holding his breath, eventually suffocating to death.

All of children in that family could cry to the point of involuntarily holding their breath. I don't think at 9 months old that is really a strategy... I lived with them from 1968 - 1970. Granted, this was the late 1960s, but we were advised to hold them upside down and gently shake them when it happened. They all outgrew it by the time they were about 8 or 9.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
108,054 Posts
Did not know.



I WISH my daughter had had the silent scream. Little girls are ear piercing! Half the time they do it just to hear themselves.
Well, guess what they move on to when they don't silent scream.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
108,054 Posts
...

Oh, Geebus, here comes the helicopter parent with his employer's fat medical card, lookin' for drugs to disipline his children.

:shaking:
Oh geebus, here comes the liberal with his government mandated insurance subsidized by everyone else talking about people that pay their way.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,073 Posts
It's more like they start to scream and get stuck before a sound comes out.
Yup, hyperventilating is the root cause, from crying too hard. Only needs to be a split second or a huge gasp to get them into it. My wife reminded me that it can be a fight or flight mechanism in some cases according to the neurologist.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
108,054 Posts
Yup, hyperventilating is the root cause, from crying too hard. Only needs to be a split second or a huge gasp to get them into it. My wife reminded me that it can be a fight or flight mechanism in some cases according to the neurologist.
With my daughter, it was instant. Not a sound until you puffed air. I'd tell her to breathe, and puff. I wish the younger one did it. She goes straight for tantrum.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,681 Posts
Discussion Starter #78
With my daughter, it was instant. Not a sound until you puffed air. I'd tell her to breathe, and puff. I wish the younger one did it. She goes straight for tantrum.
The other day, she fell off of a bench onto the concrete. There was an audible scream and cry. We thought we were in the clear. Then it was the silent scream. That's the first time we saw her eyes roll into the back of her head. I blew air onto her face, but I don't think it worked. She was out for a second, then was awake again. She took about 5 minutes to start running around again.
 
61 - 78 of 78 Posts
Top