Pirate 4x4 banner

1 - 14 of 14 Posts

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
4,957 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Newbie question alert... and on a Thursday(at least it starts with T like Tuesday)
Short: 18" 'trail' snow, plowed road with ice conditions.
Do I want skinny, fat, or usual for ~35" tire?
I can do one selectable locker and one lunchbox. Which end for which?

Long: I've got most of my build sheet out of the way for a rig that will be used as a 'home' plow truck and winter truck:
  • FJ55 with a lot of missing sheetmetal/body at ~110" wheelbase.
  • Low to no lift and ~35" tires
  • Dana 60 front/rear (kingpin front, Ford e350 van rear) going with 3.54 gears
  • 472 Cady big block
  • SM465 tranny
  • Stock late model Land cruiser tcase(split case)
My driveway is unimproved hard packed dirt. In the winter, we usually get ~18" per storm. Road in front of the house and into town is plowed(Georgetown, CA) The road is curvy and inclined.

I may expand to 'real' deep snow wheeling in a year when/if I find a good group for it.

TIRES:
Wheel will be a single beadlock of unknown type/brand.

For 'busting' and plowing 18" out of the driveway, am I better getting a skinny tire like a 35x10 TSL or 'extra wide' like a 35x16 Bogger? Or just go with a standard 35x12.5?

I'm not stuck on any particular brand/tread of a tire. Is there a preferred brand/tread?

LOCKERS:
I will be able to do one selectable locker(leaning toward Ox) and one lunchbox locker(Spartan). lunchbox is to go from 32 spline side gears to 35 spline. Selectable locker is to replace 'missing' carrier.

With the above mentioned drive conditions, Ox in front or rear?

Is there a better choice than a Spartan for lunchbox locker?

Attached picture is to show a sad FJ55 after one of the ~18" snow dumps. Another FJ55 is getting butchered and I'm hoping it will be 4-5" shorter.
 

Attachments

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
282 Posts
For plowing, tall and skinny. Get good chains, not mud chains, the ice ones. Almost sounds like you need a snowblower.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
12,604 Posts
Neither tsl or bogger is good for either.

Plowing snow and wheelin in snow are completely opposite, so you'd really need 2 sets of tires.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
4,957 Posts
Discussion Starter #6
Buy some chains if you're just plowing. Get good ones too, like Lecleed.
Thank you for a brand recommendation.
For plowing, tall and skinny. Get good chains, not mud chains, the ice ones. Almost sounds like you need a snowblower.
In your opinion, narrower than a typical 35"x12.5"?

I'll have to look into ice chains vs mud.

From the reading I've done on snow blowers, I'd have to look at the higher side of hundreds($700+). I'm getting a borderline free plow... yeah, I know that free is going to turn into very expensive but I'm not that bright:homer:
Neither tsl or bogger is good for either.

Plowing snow and wheelin in snow are completely opposite, so you'd really need 2 sets of tires.
I was just using TSL and Bogger as examples of extremely narrow vs extremely wide. Do you have a better recommendation?

Thank you for pointing out that plow is much different that snow wheel. I wasn't sure if there was some overlap.
Jesus we plow more with rotted out stock 1/2s up here. Chain it up and peel out
The green rig isn't the one being used to plow. ;)

It sounds like 'style' of tire doesn't make a damn difference... just find quality ice chains for whatever tire I have.

Any opinion on locker placement?
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
282 Posts
Can be pretty easy to break axles with lockers and chains. With the plow and that caddy motor over the front, that will be a fair amount of weight. Put a piece of scrap plate in the rear, or throw anything heavy in there. Any soft tire with lots of siping will work well in the snow. I run Duratracs or BFG Commercial traction T/A. Not sure you really need a locker, unless your plowing route is really steep...
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
4,957 Posts
Discussion Starter #8
Can be pretty easy to break axles with lockers and chains. With the plow and that caddy motor over the front, that will be a fair amount of weight. Put a piece of scrap plate in the rear, or throw anything heavy in there. Any soft tire with lots of siping will work well in the snow. I run Duratracs or BFG Commercial traction T/A. Not sure you really need a locker, unless your plowing route is really steep...
On the Cady engine, oddly enough it is lighter than the stock I6 it is replacing... about 750lbs to 640lbs:eek: My guestimate on the plow is about 200lbs.

Thank you for the input. The main place I will be plowing is ~12-13 degree slope for about 150'. The biggest issue with that section is it slopes into the hill and a 'small' ditch.

My little 4wd s10 with street 27" tires was doing relatively well 'busting' an 18" drift... up until a CV popped out off the snap ring and left me in 2wd. Then it was still doing okay until it slid into the ditch:homer:

With luck, I'll have that section concreted or improved with the ditch filled in before winter.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
12,604 Posts
I was just using TSL and Bogger as examples of extremely narrow vs extremely wide. Do you have a better recommendation?

Thank you for pointing out that plow is much different that snow wheel. I wasn't sure if there was some overlap.
Any Radial my or at will do better than a bias super swamper in snow and ice.

Snow wheelin you are usually trying to float on top, so bigger contact patch is better. Plowing, you are trying to get grip on a hard slick surface, so the smaller contact patch is better.

How often will you be going from "wheelin" mode to "Plowing" mode? Would it be easier to get a set of stockers with chains on when you put the plow on?
 

·
P.B.A.
Joined
·
4,321 Posts
Any Radial my or at will do better than a bias super swamper in snow and ice.

Snow wheelin you are usually trying to float on top, so bigger contact patch is better. Plowing, you are trying to get grip on a hard slick surface, so the smaller contact patch is better.

How often will you be going from "wheelin" mode to "Plowing" mode? Would it be easier to get a set of stockers with chains on when you put the plow on?
^^^this

As far as lockers I like selectable in the rear more in the snow than the front. I have Arb’s and I’ll run the front in rear out. So it pulls vs pushes and lock in rear when I get stuck. If that makes sense.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
12,604 Posts
^^^this

As far as lockers I like selectable in the rear more in the snow than the front. I have Arb’s and I’ll run the front in rear out. So it pulls vs pushes and lock in rear when I get stuck. If that makes sense.
I forgot to mention this also.

Personally I like an auto locker front, selectable rear. Keeps things simple and a good auto will unlock when you need it too.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
9,283 Posts
^^^this

As far as lockers I like selectable in the rear more in the snow than the front. I have Arb’s and I’ll run the front in rear out. So it pulls vs pushes and lock in rear when I get stuck. If that makes sense.
and ^^^ this

I have a Detroit in the rear of my plow rig. Sumbitch has got me stuck sideways plenty. :homer:

As for tires, going from a 38/13 TSL to a 9.50-16 traction was a nice improvement (2-3 inches narrower).



Jesus we plow more with rotted out stock 1/2s up here. Chain it up and peel out
5/4 ton muh fuggah!
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
6,053 Posts
I run a spool rear, with a heavy water tank full for weight. 36" buckshot tires. It works pretty good. I don't think I will ever wheel it, but I do enjoy it and it gets around pretty good. Front is open.

This is in a 3/4 ton Dodge however. I plow a pretty good distance and we get a lot of snow so I tend to let it rip. I have enough slip that I don't break stuff.

I have ran chains, and it was pretty cool.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
261 Posts
A lot depends on the surface and whether you have ice under it or not.

Plowing a dirt road with deep gravel on it is a pain. The plow digs a lot and you make a mess with a sharp blade. If it is packed dirt, then you will be scraping the high spots and leaving ice in the holes. If you have deep ditches on the sides then falling in them will be a genuine concern. How deep they are is a big concern. If they are deep then a bigger tire is more important as falling in with little tires means the axle hits the ground and you are stuck.

The best ice tire is not a good snow tire, is not a good mud tire. Ice needs sipes and surface pressure. Studs are hands down the best for this with a medium aggressive all terrain like a Goodyear duratrac or similar. A great snow tire is one that grips the snow and uses snow on snow for traction. A good mud tire when the snow gets slushy is a swamper or something like that which will dig and scoop.

If I had to pick a combo, build the FJ55, throw 3-400 lbs of crap in the bed, run a skinny 235 or 255 / 16 type tire that you can stud. That way you don't have so much tire you break things when you hop a little before you can push the clutch in when you catch a rut or a rock. Trust me, you can blow a Dana 44 joint right out of the knuckle on the 3rd hop with street tires on icy gravel...

One thing. Don't try to build a one-size fit's all rig. A great plow truck makes a crappy wheeling rig. A great wheeling rig makes a less than ideal plow truck.

As for lockers. I find limited slips are better for plowing. Lockers push too hard on ice and bind up too much when you are throwing power down to push snow. They also slide sideways on a grade and the plow already tries to push you down hill if you aren't careful. Just throw on some chains with decent tires and go at it till you find the combo you like.
 
1 - 14 of 14 Posts
Top