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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
Just thought I would post these up for anyone that wanted to make their own. Maybe some inspiration?

Its 1" thick 6061, uses 3/8-24 all thread for the stud, and has 1/8" thick pieces of A36 plate inbeded into two sides to provide something for the magnet to stick to. The T-handle is 3/4" 304 SS tubing, with some 2024 alum caps pressed into it. The tubing will be tig welded to the stud eventually, with some 309 ss.



 

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Nice job.
 

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Those are nice!!! When I had a buddy of mine run these, I just had him use .5" hot rolled. Saves the machine work on the plates. Of course mine aren't anywhere near as bling... Blasted them and put a decent coat of paint on them and they look OK, for tools.

Oh and unless I miss my guess, the holes are to fixture the material for machining. I have the same on mine and asked the same question.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 · (Edited)
78bronco460 said:
Those are definitely cool. Why the 4 irregularly spaced through holes?
I use this fine tool: http://www.coxco.net/images/wow.gif
lets hear what tools you used

The 4 holes were used to clamp the tool to my fixture plate, so I could contour the outside all in one setup without moving clamps. Really saves time on small runs, rather than building elaborate fixtures / clamps.

I machined the clamps on a 2.5 axis Bridgeport EZ Trak DXII, vertical knee mill.

The caps were made on a Bridgeport EZ Path, made by ROMI.

I held a Hanson adjustable die in a Wilton bench vice, while I used a Proto 9/16 combination wrench, and double nuts to chase the threads of the all thread.

I deburred the parts with an assortment of Nicholson files, and Noga deburring tools.

I turned and parted the caps with Kennametal tooling and inserts. Held with Aloris tool holders and tool post.

I machined the profile with a HSS Two Flute single end, Aluminum End Mill. (has deeper flutes for better chip removal, hence higher feed rates)

I machined the pockets with a two flute Cleveland, standard HSS single end, end mill.

I drilled the holes with Cleveland stub length, 118* Cobalt twist drills

I tapped the holes with Greenfield TIN coated, Spiral flute CNC tap.

To lubricate the end mill I used Trico NDF from a Trico Spray mist system. To lubricate the taps, I used standard Tap Magic. To lubricate the turning tools, I used good old WD-40.

I used Qallen T-Handle allen wrenches to torque the Lawson 8-32 Hex drive, Flat head machine screws.

I used a Stanley Hack saw, with a starrett 24 pitch bi-metal blade to cut the B7 3/8-24 all thread

I used a Ridgid hand tubing cutter to cut the SS tubing

I used an 8" Mititoyo Digital Caliper to take all the measurements

I used a DoAll vertical band saw to rough the Aluminum before machining

I used a Kalamazoo horizontal band saw to cut the 1/8" plate I cut the inserts out of

I also used an Enco audible edge finder to locate my parts and fixture.

Soon I will use a Lincon Ideal ARC 300 to TIG the handles to the studs, and a Chevalier surface grinder to dress up the steel inserts.



I think thats just about it. :flipoff2:
 

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Have some extra time on you hands, or has the obsessive compulsive disorder become that strong :flipoff2:

Tools I make are lucky to get their identity written on them in paint pen, much less made to look that nice.

Nice job, a tad overdone, but nice.

One question, did you use aluminum to avoid weld splatter sticking to the clamp, or was it just handy?
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
I used alum in order to keep the overall weight down, and to make them look nice. I wanted to have a wide surface for the angle gage to sit on, but didnt want to lug around a 5 lb chunk of steel to do that, or spend all day machining weight out of it. Also.... Bridgeport vertical knee mills arent known for their high metal removal rates, so alum is almost always the first material I consider using when designing a part that will be made one. In this case, steel would have prolly saved time. :shaking:

Looking at it all finished now, I wish I would have made both inserts the full 1" wide. It just looks better that way IMO.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
there are shops here capable of making the buckets on steam turbine rotors.

http://www.glmcorp.com/


I dont have the tools to do that kind of stuff though. The mill I use is only a 2.5 axis, so I really have to get creative to do 3 axis stuff though. 4 axis is out of the question :p
 

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So your rate is up to what, $3 an hour now? ;)

As always, very sweet. Wish I had the skill and equipment access to do something like that (financial sanity aside).
 
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