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Are those butt welds on the roof sections?
If so, unless you reinforce them the oil can flex is probably going to keep popping that seam.
Do you have a pneumatic panel flanging tool?
They look like this if somebody isn't familiar with them!

You can get them from several sources but, I’ll use the Northern Tool link to give you an idea. I love mine. It has made a big difference in my custom body work! Here's a link to read up on them at.
http://www.northerntool.com/shop/tools/product_14322_14322
They allow you to leave a ½” overlap flap by punching in a “Z” in one side. This tool also will punch in the holes for spot welds with a mig welder if you don’t have a dedicated spot welder.
Since you’ve got the sheet metal spot weld with a mig thing down it would be a cinch for you. This flange will give you a stronger seam joint and are well worth the price when you consider you won’t have to redo the butt welds again.
Of course you could weld a reinforcement strip over the under side to the seam to beef it up. But that’s a pain sometimes. But, with the little hole punch part of the tool, it makes it a lot easier.

Looks like the Fiberglass hood will be a lot of work but once you cut it down it may save you some weight. But then again, maybe not so light if you go overboard with the reinforcing on the fiberglass splicing. That part is really fun if you can make the pieces line up where you want them. I like working with fiberglass. It’s so much easier to fudge with.
I think I’d go with cutting down the glass hood, just to keep the “WTF Factor” going.

Love the Grenade Shifter handle. It just says "Road Rage, Mad Max Style"!

Curtis
 

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Discussion Starter #222
Honestly the hood sounds like a lot more work than it is worth. Re sell it and spend the time/energy/motivation that will get you more in the end.
Just my 2C
Looks like the Fiberglass hood will be a lot of work but once you cut it down it may save you some weight. But then again, maybe not so light if you go overboard with the reinforcing on the fiberglass splicing. That part is really fun if you can make the pieces line up where you want them. I like working with fiberglass. It’s so much easier to fudge with.
I think I’d go with cutting down the glass hood, just to keep the “WTF Factor” going.
Not planning on cutting the hood. Just going to re-mount the side-hood pieces and either modify the grill, or make a new one. No big deal, really. Am sure you will agree when you see what I'm talking about.
 

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Interesting that a new hood has the pattern already on it and was painted before the fixtures were added. So much for them not having a pattern until being installed on a truck. Perhaps the A3s are done differently or maybe my source on the pattern being done after final assembly was wrong? Something to ponder... :D
 

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Somehow I took read into it that you were going to cut it according to the cut lines on this picture.

And based on that picture and the underbracing it didn't look like it was going to be easy.
We will rely that you have it worked out and we wait to see it.

Curtis
 

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Discussion Starter #225 (Edited)
hardtop & roofrack

Are those butt welds on the roof sections?
If so, unless you reinforce them the oil can flex is probably going to keep popping that seam.
Do you have a pneumatic panel flanging tool?
They look like this if somebody isn't familiar with them!

You can get them from several sources but, I’ll use the Northern Tool link to give you an idea. I love mine. It has made a big difference in my custom body work! Here's a link to read up on them at.
http://www.northerntool.com/shop/tools/product_14322_14322
They allow you to leave a ½” overlap flap by punching in a “Z” in one side. This tool also will punch in the holes for spot welds with a mig welder if you don’t have a dedicated spot welder.
Since you’ve got the sheet metal spot weld with a mig thing down it would be a cinch for you. This flange will give you a stronger seam joint and are well worth the price when you consider you won’t have to redo the butt welds again.
Of course you could weld a reinforcement strip over the under side to the seam to beef it up. But that’s a pain sometimes. But, with the little hole punch part of the tool, it makes it a lot easier.
Thanks for posting. Really appreciate this type of input, as I'm always interested in learning about better ways to do things. This isn't just show-and-tell, there are a lot of areas where I need help!

Yes, that's just a butt-welded seam. Was planning welding it up like the back panel. Not strong enough? Not going to be a problem here because of the way I'm going to reinforce the roof, but am curious.

I'm going to cut-down a big sheet of aluminum to reinforce the roof and to create a low-profile roofrack (with tie-down points) that I will glue to the top of the roof. On the inside, I think I might line the hardtop with fiberglass. Want to be able to carry stuff on top of the cab when I don't have the camper on the back.
 

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Discussion Starter #226
Interesting that a new hood has the pattern already on it and was painted before the fixtures were added. So much for them not having a pattern until being installed on a truck. Perhaps the A3s are done differently or maybe my source on the pattern being done after final assembly was wrong? Something to ponder... :D
I'm sure you were right about the cab being remanufactured, but this hood has to be brand new because it doesn't even have hood hinges drilled.
 

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So, you still gonna try and install that fiberglass hood?

Personally, i think it should be let go and stick with stock. a cut down like that would be a lot of work, likely will never look as good and you would only save 3# anyway.
yeah it is stronger, but how weak is the old one?

Either way, i am Loving your project.
and my wife hates it. lol
(I keep looking at old army trucks on the computer at the auctions near here.
She just Knows i am coming home with one someday. *grin*)
 

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Your butt welds will be just fine. When I was in the shop the only time we put a flange on something was whe we glued panels on.
 

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Discussion Starter #229
So, you still gonna try and install that fiberglass hood?

Personally, i think it should be let go and stick with stock. a cut down like that would be a lot of work, likely will never look as good and you would only save 3# anyway.
yeah it is stronger, but how weak is the old
The hood is NOT getting cut down the middle, it's only getting trimmed down to the right length. Making the fenders and grill fit is easier than it sounds. You'd have to see how it all goes together to understand, and I can't show you because my truck is still in pieces. But trust me. No big deal.
 

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Discussion Starter #230
Your butt welds will be just fine. When I was in the shop the only time we put a flange on something was whe we glued panels on.
You think so? I have done stuff like this before, but don't really know what I'm doing when it comes to bodywork. Just making it up as I go, hoping it holds together.
 

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Made a new shifter. It's much longer, and is positioned closer to the steering wheel. Wanted to top it with a pineapple grenade, but the lemon was a lot more comfortable.


Lol, got a lot of folks around there lookin to steal a deuce, do ya? Love the build!
 

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Lol, got a lot of folks around there lookin to steal a deuce, do ya? Love the build!
Gotta think dude, that truck probably does not have an ignition key. Most of them you flip a switch to on, and push a button. Sometimes you have to mess with a hand choke, but thats about it. Some older semi trucks you just insert the key and turn it, then push a button to start. You can easily break into the truck, pop the keyed ignition switch out, cross some wires, push the button, and voila! You've got a running semi at your disposal.
 

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You think so? I have done stuff like this before, but don't really know what I'm doing when it comes to bodywork. Just making it up as I go, hoping it holds together.
First, I would like to say, "Awesome!"

Second, as an autobody tech, I would recommend something like the flanging tool in the future, or to create a joint with another thin strip of metal. Basically butt the two parts together, then weld the reinforcing strip over the top (or bottom), bridging the seam. It makes it much stronger. We do this when splicing in a new sheet metal section like a quarter panel, and call it "sleeving". Ideally, you weld the sleeve on by punching or drilling 1/4" holes a few inches apart down the whole length of the weld.

EDIT: LOL, it would figure that my first ever post on Pirate would be for autobody advice...
 

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First, I would like to say, "Awesome!"

Second, as an autobody tech, I would recommend something like the flanging tool in the future, or to create a joint with another thin strip of metal. Basically butt the two parts together, then weld the reinforcing strip over the top (or bottom), bridging the seam. It makes it much stronger. We do this when splicing in a new sheet metal section like a quarter panel, and call it "sleeving". Ideally, you weld the sleeve on by punching or drilling 1/4" holes a few inches apart down the whole length of the weld.

EDIT: LOL, it would figure that my first ever post on Pirate would be for autobody advice...
think about it...umless you use resistance welding what does the flange do? If you run a bead accros the top of the flange it is basically the same as abutt weld. if you put spots through the holes you make with the tool there is way less weld and then you have problems. You will be fine
 

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There are going to be several selector valves in the system, that will need to do things like:

1) switch between tanks

2) return fuel to the tank it came from

3) redirect fuel from the clean tank to flush out the slut tank's lines & filters

4) bypass the FBO filter when running gasoline in the slut tank

5) run in closed-loop to filter / polish fuel

I'd like to set it up so that when I select a tank using valve #1, valve #2 would also be switched over so that fuel is coming from, and being returned to, the same tank. I'm sure I could do this with some type of simple mechanical linkage, or two switches, but it would be ideal if I could find one valve that would operate two circuits at the same time. What would be the best way to handle the electrical side of things? Should I just use manual switches to turn fuel pumps on/off, or should I tie them into the selector valves in the fluid circuit somehow?

hammer suggested 5-ton selector valves and I thought those were exactly what I was looking for. But I'm having second thoughts as I'm starting to make line drawings to figure out how to plumb everything. When feeding the engine from the diesel tank, I'll want to return the fuel to the diesel tank - and when I'm feeding the engine from the slut tank, I'll want to return the fuel to the slut tank. But when I'm purging the system (running diesel from the diesel tank through the slut tank's lines and filters), I'll want to return that fuel to the slut tank. So I think I'm going to have to use two separate control valves. That is, unless there's a three-position valve that would allow me to:

1) pull from diesel tank -> return to diesel tank

2) pull from slut tank -> return to slut tank

3) pull from diesel tank -> return to slut tank

Also thinking that position 3) would also allow me to transfer fuel from the diesel tank to the slut tank without having to install another fuel pump. This might be useful if I ever need to thin any of the alternative fuels in the slut tank.
look at the factory fuel tank selector valves from the dual tanked F-series trucks in the early 90's they switch the return to the same tank as the source. I'm thinking specifically of the '94-97 powerstrokes but the earlier IDI trucks would have the same valve also, you'd have to research fuels compatibility though many are running B100 and WVO with no problems and wmo blends, you would need to evaluate it for gasoline. Then you would only need a 3 way valve to provide pulling from the diesel and returning to the slut. Be aware that this configuration (pulling from one and dumping to the other) has the potential to quickly overfill the return tank.
 

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Discussion Starter #236
Lol, got a lot of folks around there lookin to steal a deuce, do ya? Love the build!
Gotta think dude, that truck probably does not have an ignition key. Most of them you flip a switch to on, and push a button. Sometimes you have to mess with a hand choke, but thats about it. Some older semi trucks you just insert the key and turn it, then push a button to start. You can easily break into the truck, pop the keyed ignition switch out, cross some wires, push the button, and voila! You've got a running semi at your disposal.
Exactly right. No keys. Came with the chain and padlock instead. Going to be adding a keyed ignition switch, locking door handles, and a bunch of other security-related stuff.
 

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Discussion Starter #237
...as an autobody tech, I would recommend something like the flanging tool in the future, or to create a joint with another thin strip of metal. Basically butt the two parts together, then weld the reinforcing strip over the top (or bottom), bridging the seam. It makes it much stronger. We do this when splicing in a new sheet metal section like a quarter panel, and call it "sleeving". Ideally, you weld the sleeve on by punching or drilling 1/4" holes a few inches apart down the whole length of the weld.
Thanks for the input. I can see how this might be advantageous in a lot of situations, especially when repairing a body panel that you can't access from the backside. But the way I've stitched these panels together, I don't think there's much chance they're coming apart. Not saying that I've done such a great job, there's just a lot of weld surface area. You really think it'll be a problem?
You will be fine
I'm kinda thinking so too. Like I said before, it doesn't even really matter in this application because of how I'm planning on reinforcing the roof, but I'm still interested in doing things well. Would not have guessed that butt-welding the panels back together might ever be an issue.
 

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Discussion Starter #238
look at the factory fuel tank selector valves from the dual tanked F-series trucks in the early 90's they switch the return to the same tank as the source. I'm thinking specifically of the '94-97 powerstrokes but the earlier IDI trucks would have the same valve also, you'd have to research fuels compatibility though many are running B100 and WVO with no problems and wmo blends, you would need to evaluate it for gasoline. Then you would only need a 3 way valve to provide pulling from the diesel and returning to the slut. Be aware that this configuration (pulling from one and dumping to the other) has the potential to quickly overfill the return tank.
Thanks for the suggestion. I've made a note about that.
 
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