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Discussion Starter #21 (Edited)
radiant heating / subfloor

Planning on using radiant heating almost exclusively to heat mah deuce. More about that later, but I'll show you now how I laid 1/2" PEX tubing into the subfloor. Had never used a router before, but got the hang of it quickly. All this routing was done with a 5/8" ball-end router bit and took me the better part of two days to finish. Just laying everything out took forever, but I was working off my SolidWorks drawings so I was reasonably certain that I was putting the PEX tubing down in all the right places. Everywhere there's open floor is heated, including under the desk and in the shower/bathroom. Also ran a second circuit straight to the bathroom so that I can heat that zone independently.




















 

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Discussion Starter #23
laminate flooring

Did a lot of research on flooring materials and ended up using a commercial-grade laminate flooring called Konnecto, which I ordered from floormall.com. This is not a particularly cheap product, but it's not working out too well for me. It's untended to be installed as a floating floor, which I wasn't able to do (had to nachor cabinets to the floor), so it's buckles and shrinks a bit as temperature changes. It's also not anywhere near as durable as I'd hoped it would be. Imagine I'll be replacing the flooring with something else in the not too distant future.

Decided at the last minute to install a very thin (20g?) sheet of laser-cut steel between the subfloor and the laminate to help distribute the heat a little more evenly.





 

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Discussion Starter #24
painting

These M109's are wired for 12/24/110, but I ripped out all the stuff out because I had all new electrical stuff that I was planning to install. There were also a bunch of random holes in the walls for things that had been installed/removed over the years. So I patched/covered the holes with a combination of custom laser-cut sheetmetal pieces that sort of go with the riveted construction of the interior, and bondo to fill some of the holes where I didn't want to use those sheetmetal cover pieces.

Bought some gnarly marine/industrial-grade paint (VOC's weren't any worse than typical interior housepaints I'd looked at to compare), and primered/painted the whole inside of the box. Went with a color combo that leaves a lot of people scratching their heads, but I painted the side walls and the roof tan and the front/back walls blue. I think it looks kinda cool when the doors are open and you're looking into the truck from the rear.













 

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Discussion Starter #25 (Edited)
slide-out bed

I had a pretty good idea of how I wanted to make a couch that would slide-out to make a queen-sized bed, but Shaun and I built a quick mock-up to make sure the idea would work before we built the full-scale version. Worked out great. The bed slides on heavy-duty 500lb drawer slides and locks into place in the open and closed positions. There's a long locking cabinet door for that wedge-shaped box on the wall, which sets the angle for the couch-back cushion and will be used as a gun locker and place to stash fishing poles and things like that. Storage area under the bed will be used for things like the fresh water tanks, water pumps and all the stuff that I don't want to have out in the cold.







 

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Discussion Starter #26
more cabinetry

Spent a lot of time back at my shop fitting the cabinets. The cabinets have all been stained, but I asked them to leave the cabinet doors bare because I want to burn some artwork into them before they're finished. Those are really only mock-up doors anyway (plywood).

Had to cut the bottom of this cabinet at an angle so I could stand it up inside the box. It's hidden by the cabinet next to it though, so it doesn't show.



Bought a nice Bosch jigsaw and have been using the shit out of it.



Pretty happy with the final fit of all the cabinets. The sheetmetal is really inconsistent, so it was almost impossible to get anything to fit perfectly.



All the full-length drawers came out really nice. This is something that I guess most motorhomes don't do (have full-length pull-out drawers), but apparently they drawer slides are a lot more expensive. That's a whole lot of lost storage space.



The cabinet door has been cut shorter to allow this pullout shelf to be opened without having to open the cabinet door. It will serve as a tabletop surface across from the couch. Somewhere to set food, drinks, etc. Also works as a sort of TV-dinner tray when the bed is pulled out.



This is my workspace, with a cabinet where I'll mount a pullout printer, scanner, and stuff like that. There will be a large flatscreen computer monitor mounted to the face of that triangular cabinet, which I'll be able to plug into my laptop and use while I'm working, and will also be able to swing open and watch TV/movies from the couch/bed.





This is the showerpan that I got from Kinro. It's only 24x36" and I'm going to mount a toilet in there too. Will have an outdoor shower that I expect to use most of the time, but wanted to have the option to shower inside if I'm camped in an urban/populated area. Plus I figured that will be a great place to dry wet gear, put muddy boots, etc.

 

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Discussion Starter #27
overhead cabinets

This is the kind of stuff I just didn't have to tools or the know-how to do myself. Was really impressed with all the work the guys at Davis Cabinets did.



Overhead cabinets run along the whole length of the driver's-side of the box, with one big triangular overhead cabinet down at the end (front of the box).



This is one of my favorite things about this whole project. It's just so stupid-simple. I asked Shaun if he could recommend any struts that would hold the overhead cabinet doors open, and he told me that the gas struts tend to tweak the cabinet doors because of the way they put uneven pressure on them. So he showed me how I could install these common springs that would snap into position when I opened the cabinet doors all the way, and to close the cabinet doors you just brush your finger against them and the bend/fold out of the way.

 

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Discussion Starter #28
cabinet latches

Spent a lot of time looking for the perfect cabinet door latches and I found them, but couldn't afford them. Really nice flush locking stainless steel slam-latches for boats. Would have cost me several thousand dollars for as many as I needed (lots of cabinets). Luckily I found these, which I think are a decent alternative. Not ideal, and a little bit clunky/cumbersome to use, but they were the right price (a local sheetmetal shop had a bunch of them left over from another project). They were meant to be installed in sheetmetal boxes, so I had to cut the backing brackets down, but they worked out pretty well in the end.









 

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There's nothing particularly unusual about traveling/living in a motorhome, but the imposing nature of mah deuce tends to give people the wrong idea. A lot of people see a military vehicle and assume that I must be preparing for the apocalypse, and a surprising number of people try to relate to me like that nutjob in the military surplus store in the movie Falling Down. They want to tell me all about their bunkers and their stockpile of weapons and food and whatever. Like we're brothers in arms or something. Creeps me out.
Repaint it with a pink and purple camo scheme. That will get them off your back... :D
 

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Discussion Starter #31
Repaint it with a pink and purple camo scheme. That will get them off your back... :D
I actually did! After Graeme and I built this custom cabover rack at his shop, I needed to put something on the bare metal. So I went down to ACE and bought some custom-tinted paint that they had messed-up for 1/2-price. It's not pink it's salmon! haha. Whatever, the whole truck is going to get sand-blasted an re-painted eventually. Was having a beer at Graeme's house afterwards and he came walking outside with an armload of mostly empty cans of spraypaint. "Here you go." So I threw-down this psychedelic hippy-killer paintjob on the spot. The cab and all the related sheetmetal parts have already been sandblasted and primed. Only waiting to reinstall that stuff until after I've finished the engine-swap.

When I re-paint the truck it's going to get an OD base-coat and it will be painted camo, but more playful than militant. Monkeys swinging through the jungle and that sort of thing, and stuff like this. Planning on repainting it fairly often actually, probably seasonally. Will have a trailer full of tools and paint guns and an air compressor with me, so why not have fun with it?







 

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Ah, you had me liking this build up until you decided on some bastard paint job. :shaking:
 

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Sorry, I take everything seriously because I'm a nutjob like the guy who ran the surplus store in Falling Down. I'll spare you the details of my bunker and food and weapons stores.
 

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Came over from ADV & had to sign up just to follow this build through.

Not that I mind a site like this. I could learn some stuff here too. :)
 

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I had a long conversation with myself and decided that I ought to make use of the resources I had available to do the best job possible. So I took a step back and reconsidered what it was that I was attempting to build and why.
Had this same conversation with myself many times.

I like your build and think the idea of living in an RV entertaining; unfortunately it only takes a few days in my class C RV to appreciate "home".

Living vicariously through you.
 

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Discussion Starter #38 (Edited)
uhaul trailer

A trailer was always part of the plan. Wanted to build something small enough that it wouldn't limit where I could go, but large enough to haul all my tools and toys. The trailer would be outfitted as a sort of a mobile workshop, and would store extra fuel, water, propane, etc. With all these things onboard, it would also be able to function as a self-contained basecamp. I asked some questions on SS and decided to build on an M353 trailer chassis. Ended up buying one through govliquidation.com for about $300. Had to wait for my EUC to clear and then drive up to Ft. Lewis to retrieve it, but for $300 I wasn't complaining.




The next purchase I made was a uhaul truck with a 12ft box that I scored for $600. Had to drive to Idaho to pick that up. Pulled the box off as soon as I got back and listed the truck for sale. The plan was to set this relatively lightweight box on top of the heavy-duty trailer chassis. Total trailer weight would be about 4,000lbs (empty).



 

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Discussion Starter #39
uhaul trailer

Started by removing some of the old generator boxes and diamondplate, then made a bolt-on subframe to support the uhaul box.

















 

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Discussion Starter #40
Next I had to cut out the wheelwells, and then it was time to transfer the box onto the trailer chassis. Went smooooooooothly. Had to use a use a port-a-power to tweak the trailer fenders into the right shape, but everything fit nice and tight when I was done.

















 
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