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Why does this look like dogshit?

I’m running a HF mig on 220 with C25 gas on auto settings. It did fine with flux core but most of the work so far with gas and .030 or .035 wire looks somewhere between tolerable and awful. I used a new flap disc and acetone on this beforehand.

This is the first gas bottle I’ve run through it. I can feel it coming out, tried flow everywhere from 15 cfh to 40cfh, tried a larger tip, different angles, it doesn’t seem to matter. The bead looks fine as it’s going down then erupts as it cools.

Maybe they didn’t give me the right gas?
 

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Why does this look like dogshit?

I’m running a HF mig on 220 with C25 gas on auto settings. It did fine with flux core but most of the work so far with gas and .030 or .035 wire looks somewhere between tolerable and awful. I used a new flap disc and acetone on this beforehand.

This is the first gas bottle I’ve run through it. I can feel it coming out, tried flow everywhere from 15 cfh to 40cfh, tried a larger tip, different angles, it doesn’t seem to matter. The bead looks fine as it’s going down then erupts as it cools.

Maybe they didn’t give me the right gas?
what wire are you using? and the gas you should be running is co2 gas. the filler wire you should be using for short circuit transfer is er70s-6 for most of your steel welding.
 

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25% CO2 75% argon.

ER70S6 wire .035. Also tried some .030 of the same.
is there a particular reason you are using so much argon for mild steel . in my 15+ years of welding the only time I would use argon for mig welding is stainless steel ,or aluminum . when welding mild steel to mild steel the max amount of argon would be 15-25% argon and the rest co2, or just straight co2.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
is there a particular reason you are using so much argon for mild steel . in my 15+ years of welding the only time I would use argon for mig welding is stainless steel ,or aluminum . when welding mild steel to mild steel the max amount of argon would be 15-25% argon and the rest co2, or just straight co2.
I thought C25 was the most common mig gas used on steel. I think it’s the only mixed gas they even stock.
 

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I thought C25 was the most common mig gas used on steel. I think it’s the only mixed gas they even stock.
The most common is to run straight
Ok, all the welding charts show C25. You might not use it but it’s super common.
have you tried running straight co2 ,this is a much better option for penetration and a bit cheaper .
 

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The gas has nothing to do with it. C25, Stargon is commonly used for MIG welding. The weld picture looks like you had contaminated metal. Nice welds start with freshly ground surfaces. Also when switching wire size, you need to run the corresponding tip size in your gun.

Sent from my SM-G960U using Tapatalk
 

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As others have said make sure you have the correct polarity for solid MiG wire. It’s the opposite of flux core.

Grind your material clean.

Was there wind around? I’ve had similar welds when wind was blowing my shielding gas away.

Lastly, set the machine yourself. 17.3 volts and 170 wire feed (ipm) on clean metal with a gas flow of 25 lpm/CFM/whatever it is. See what it looks like.
 

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I have got one bad tank in my lifetime… not sure what was in it, but the weld product looked like that…. Swapped to a new tank and all was well… it happens. Also could be no gas at the tip… triple check. Bad gas or no gas, same potential result.. no shielding going on… good luck
 

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According to your user's manual from Harbor Freight the " TITANIUM MIG 170™ Professional Welder with 120/240V Input" requires:

14. Feed Roller instructions:
Check that the Feed Roller is correct for the
type of wire being used (solid core or flux-
cored) and that it is turned to properly match
the wire size marked on the Wire Spool.

I did not see where you posted about flipping the feed roller for solid core.

"note: The knurled groove is used for flux-cored wire.
The V-grooves are used for solid / MIG wire."

You have fairly spaced blow through holes in your work until the very last of the bead, it might be a feed problem.
 

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Porosity ( holes in the weld like you’ve got) is caused by lack of proper shielding gas or contamination. For solid wire your electrode (wire) should be positive and the ground clamp negative. Rust or paint or any foreign material ( even mill scale - that black scale on steel) will cause porosity (even solvent you cleaned with).
Make sure you’re gas nozzle is clean so gas can come out (you did put the gas nozzle back on which wasn’t needed for flux core?) make sure there is no wind or draft blowing your shielding gas away. Either straight CO2 or 75/25 gas will work with steel - CO2 burns deeper but 75/25 will give a prettier/ smoother weld. End of nozzle within 1/2” of metal and almost 90 degree angle. Low angle can draw air in and cause porosity. Around 20cfh gas flow. Go to Millerwelds.com or Lincolnelectric.com they should have instructions and booklets.
 

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Porosity ( holes in the weld like you’ve got) is caused by lack of proper shielding gas or contamination. For solid wire your electrode (wire) should be positive and the ground clamp negative. Rust or paint or any foreign material ( even mill scale - that black scale on steel) will cause porosity (even solvent you cleaned with).
Make sure you’re gas nozzle is clean so gas can come out (you did put the gas nozzle back on which wasn’t needed for flux core?) make sure there is no wind or draft blowing your shielding gas away. Either straight CO2 or 75/25 gas will work with steel - CO2 burns deeper but 75/25 will give a prettier/ smoother weld. End of nozzle within 1/2” of metal and almost 90 degree angle. Low angle can draw air in and cause porosity. Around 20cfh gas flow. Go to Millerwelds.com or Lincolnelectric.com they should have instructions and booklets.
This is the most accurate post on here. Follow this and you will resolve the issue.
 
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