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Discussion Starter #1
I am about to purchase my 48" tires for my rig, and just trying to figure out what the best way to mount them is?

i am doubting a conrads or tire america will be able to mount these guys.

will a local truck and commercial tire shop do it for me? or do they only deal with fleets and such?

Is there a way i can do it from home?

My rims are the stock rockwell one piece 20" military steel wheels.

how do you guys get this done?
 

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I would take it to one of the big rig shops. Them dam split ring can be a bitch. There petty good at snapen shines. Have u flipped the ceters yets. Do that first.
 

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There are very special preceedures you MUST follow when mounting tires on split rims. If you screw up and inflate a tire that isn't seated properly on the split ring, it can fly off with enough force to literally cut you in half. A commercial tire shop can change them for you if they have a cage or some guys that know how to do it without the cage. You basically have to be very careful when dismounting the tire and ring, so you do not bend the rim or ring, or damage it's seating surface. When inflating the tire, you must put it inside a cage for this purpose, or wrap chains through the rim holes and around the tire and bolt them together good so that it will retain the ring if it should come off. It's also a very good itde to use a 10' air line with a gauge, so you can stand back away from it, and lay in face down on the ground when inflating. These rims can easily kill you if you don't know what you are doing. It is possible to change them yourself, but you must know the proper proceedures and be very careful. I HIGHLY recommend you find a shop to do them if you have never done it before.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
wow, um how does it work.... i just figured they poped over the seat like normal tires do... i dint know these rims were anything special.

anyone know of instructions or photos of how these things come apart or go together? not that i would try it myself... i am just curious as to how they work, i have heard stories of these things... My dad used to work in construction, and i guess big machines use rims like that... but i never understood how they work or what exactly is so dangerous about them
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Ramrock said:
I would take it to one of the big rig shops. Them dam split ring can be a bitch. There petty good at snapen shines. Have u flipped the ceters yets. Do that first.

flipped the centers? what do you mean?

are you talking about rotating the hubs to narrow the axle? if so, no i am keeping them full width, wish they were even a tad wider. even thought about turning the rims backwards, so they act like offest rims.
 

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In his post he said they were one piece rims. So that would mean they are not split right? Either way if you dont want to mess with ithey your local heavy truck tire man should be able to help. Or even a heavy equipment tire man could help they do split rimms all day.
 

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On my rockwells I flipped and rewelded the centers on the rims after the tires were mounted. I figured everything was thick enough so no worries. I also welded the split rings on AFTER mounting. Again, some 6011 rod to burn through the CARC (deeelish!) and those rings are on permanently. It looks like I'm going to toast these (old-ish) tires before long, but that's ok because the rims are cheap (as you well know).

With my 52/53's (16.00x20), I had to get the TDS tire guys to use their big ass tire crane to push down on the bead to mount while we they hit it down with a duckbill mallet. Hey, another thing - the big ass tires want to grab the rim and roll when mounted. It might be good to take a grinder and radius, yes, grind on the rubber, of the inside edge of the outside bead, or in other words, the first part of the second tire bead that touches the rim. Loads of lube will help the mounting, but it also increases the chance that your tires will spin on the rim at LOW psi.

Now. I wheel these things at 0 psi. I've already spun one wheel past the point where I can fill it up. I suggest that you keep at least a few PSI in there if you can.... this might stop them from spinning (or do the new fangled screw locks... I had always intended to drop a box of 5/16" lag bolts in each wheel but christ if I had the time).

Big tires are cool.

Oh yeah, and with regards to filling these, take all precautions stated. If you're not a believer, look at the sidewall, and look at how many single square inches are on that sidewall (the area of the sidewall, which is 1800 square inches on a 53). Then multiply by PSI inside the tire. You realize that there are TENS OF THOUSANDS of pounds of force that will accellerate that 15 lb ring at many hundreds of times the force of gravity*. Split rims are shaped charges in disguise and that ring will cleanly separate body from appendage if given the chance.

Bob

*The math
· sidewall area of a 16r20 is 1800 in².
· a 53 fully aired up is like 90 psi, and 1800*90=162 THOUSAND POUNDS OF FORCE
(granted, you'd never air this up to 90 unless you were working on the FANTASTIC M1070 SuperHET, aka the best truck ever made)
· Ok, so let's go to SI units because they are easy. Let's say, that ballpark, the force on the ring is 10,000 times gravity, or will produce roughly 100 km/s². Over just 10 cm of distance (let's say that the tire will stop pushing the ring after only 4 inches), this will accelerate the ring for only .0009 seconds. That's fast enough, however, to accelerate it to 89 meters-per-second.

Coming back to English measurements, that equates to about 200 mph.

Ok, this is all totally back of the envelope and rough, and the tire probably blows out maybe twice the distance (resulting in about, say, 3-something times the total speed), but a 15 lb ring going that fast is going to be really painful. Shit, I dunno. My math is rough but bottom line, those rings go HELLA fast.

Bob
 

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So are they split ring rims or not. Hey do they have a split on one side of the rims edge. If there a solid rim i would still take them to a tire shop. A couple buck for alot of work. Why do you want to be so WIDE. Is this a mudding rig.
 

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Ok.

Terminology time.

Stock "split" rims on trucks don't look like new fangled 2 piece rims. They are a big ass shell and centersection, with one lip on one side as part of the shell. The other rim is a piece of spring steel that is installed after the tire is slipped onto the shell.

Please use teh google.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
Ramrock said:
So are they split ring rims or not. Hey do they have a split on one side of the rims edge. If there a solid rim i would still take them to a tire shop. A couple buck for alot of work. Why do you want to be so WIDE. Is this a mudding rig.
mostly mud and just woodland terrain. no rocks out here. just fields and mud and woods.

wider is more stable and less likely to flip... i figure i am already freaking wide, so if i am not going to fit now, I am going fit any less if i am wider. so why worry about it at all. and already my hubs stick out like 6" past the outter edge of my tires... so they are going to get hung up on trees and such, so might as well flip the rims and prevent the hubs from becoming tree anchors.

it is just a thought... not set on it at all...
 

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Those rims in the pic are standard military split ring rims, so all of the things in my above post applies. They can be very dangerous if the mounting is not done properly. Take it to a professional. The money it would cost you is not worth you or someone else's life. There was a guy near here that had one come apart on him, around 1995. It just grazed him, but it slit his neck to the bone. He bled to death before anyone could even get to the phone to call 911.

Here is a page on safety when dealing with split rims. It's from down under, but the info still applies:
http://www.safetyline.wa.gov.au/pagebin/pg000677.htm
 

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yep split just like they ran on heavy trucks for ever, not reel hard to work on but if you have never messed with them take them to a heavy tire shop. Or just call them most will come to you.
 
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