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:confused::confused:

Why would you NOT want gutters?
Yearly maintenance and require annual cleaning, when a standard drip line is fine in most all cases unless you have a particular valley or specific design characteristic that will cause an area to wash. Then you only need gutters in that specific problem area.

And they are ugly.
 

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Some stuff on my own list for my future reno:
-Mini full bathroom for each bedroom
-Outdoor shower and large sink for hosing off before even getting in the house, with entry/exit door into a bathroom or to laundry room
-A few more exterior hose bibbs including hot water in at least one spot for something like a pressure washer to hookup to.
-Drains everywhere - shop floor, bathrooms, etc. Just hose that chit down.
-Central vacuum system in house, dust collection/vac/exhaust system in shop
-Extra insulation/sound deadening for bedrooms and bathrooms
-At least one switched light in each room, with dimmer. Fuck lamps.
-More exterior outlets, including some up under eaves of roof w/switches inside for stuff like xmas lights or outdoor patio lights, etc.
-USB outlets on counters, near couches, near beds where those things would be plugged in since everything runs off them these days
-New higher amp electrical panel (I'm at 150) and re-wire house so I've got each room on separate breakers, more dedicated 20a outlets in house (like laundry room, entertainment center and a few more in my shop)
-whole house fan/exhaust
-mini split system/hvac in shop
-hot/cold water to shop for sink
-central automated water/sprinkler system for my non-potable irrigation water, perimeter sprinklers for fire protection
-the fancy automated self-cleaning filter for my irrigation
 

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Yearly maintenance and require annual cleaning, when a standard drip line is fine in most all cases unless you have a particular valley or specific design characteristic that will cause an area to wash. Then you only need gutters in that specific problem area.

And they are ugly.
Don't forget the part where a sheet of snow decides to take the gutter with it on its way off the house.
 

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Good question. And can probably be omitted from my list with a new planned house. If your roof is built right with metal and overlapped with lips and such so that they can't back up and go back into the eaves period, then go with them. If they fail (overflow due to leaves or ice or combo of both) the top is usually even and not tilted out. If tilted then not by much. So it's going to go back towards the house when it overflows.

I've had 2 failures and both they syphoned back into the eaves uphill by leaves. But I guess could have been prevented if I would have ripped them off and redid my roof correctly in which I'm planning to do.

Another reason would be the pure maintenance. Someone has got to stay on top of them yearly or bi-yearly. I prefer to have maintenance free if all possible. The older I get the more I hate ladders.

Also they become weights when full. And if hung below the eave become a lip for wind.

I like the galvanized gutter guard but it's still not an exact answer to prevent failure. I live near pin oaks and their leaves can travel for miles to mess up a gutter flow. They are shaped so that they create havoc with the galvanized mesh gutter guard. And plastic gutter guard is a pure joke for the NC sun.

Then you got long runs. If you slope at 1/4" per foot minimum they will be hanging down too much to catch anything on a 28'+ run. And if ran too flat, they will accumulate sediment no matter what guard you have.

I just don't like them period unless above a walkway or door of any kind. But if planned right they can be a foundation savior!

Choose your poison I guess on that one.
 

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on the short list of things I like about my current house:

hose bibs that seal well inside the wall. no worry about freezing, easy maint.
 

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-whole house fan/exhaust

OMG!!!! I TOTALLY forgot this one. Had one before and used it on occasion but when I did, it was priceless!


Burnt toast??? Open a window in the kitchen and flip a switch. Count to about 5 and GONE! Smoke and all.

Fall and Spring when you want fresh air from outside and you open the windows, they don't just blow in air by themselves. Crack the fan and you got a fan in every room as long as you have a crack under the doors. Plus you're not just swapping air from room to room. It goes out a path to the fan and out the eaves of the attic.

Same for summer. 200 degrees in the attic, hit that rascal for a few minutes and then you're ready to climb on up and change a bulb or pack rat more shit in the same temp as your house.

Mine was way bigger than needed. But it was impressive when needed!

Which also leads to side to side sliding windows. When you open a up and down sliding window the air is either all at the bottom, all at the top or a small portion top and bottom. With side to side it flows from top to bottom as much as the window will open so that it's proportioned for a full flow from top to bottom.
 

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A bathroom you can actually take a comfy shit in. Not sure what is up with new home construction but it seems that they put the toilet in some little cubby.
Its like trying to take a shit in a phone booth
 

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I'm working on building a shop with living space above (I don't need to hear about how awful of an idea this is - I'm aware, and working with what I've got)

In-slab radiant - anybody who has worked in one in a cold climate knows why.
Took a cue from a friend and used 1" foam as a bond break on the inside between the slab and the frost wall. Intentionally left the insulation higher than the slab when it was poured, and I'll cut it down later. The frost wall essentially has a french drain under it, so once I cut the insulation flush with the floor, it'll act like a ghetto floor drain (because local code prevents me from having a real drain).
Concrete poured thicker than needed with the tubing routed to allow drilling for anchors for a 2 post with out fear of hitting one. I used Crete-Heat insulation for the tubing.

Ridiculous light and outlet density. A friend of mine installed wall lights in his shop that he likes a lot.

Welding receptacles. Also ran 3 wire to one of the welding receptacles just in case I ever need 3 wire for something (or need to rig a generator the fun way).

my Power is run overhead to a pole with a meter/load center combo unit on a backer board on the pole. This allowed me to get connected and have outlets/pole mounted lights long before the house was up. The house has a 200A breaker box treated as a sub panel.

Ran the water line in 3" conduit under the slab,+ 14 feet away from the house for when I build my car port/lean-to off the side. That way I can pull a new line in without breaking concrete if I ever had to.

Structured Media box in the garage with a 1.5" conduit back to the pole to collect Coax/Cat6 with room to spare for modem/switches.

Going to run a 2" conduit from the top of the breaker box and 1.5" from the media box through the top plate into the trusses so that if I ever need to pull something new, I don't have to F with the wall cavity.

Going to run a 240V circuit to the utility room for a compressor so I don't have to listen to it. Also running a spare 30A 240V circuit to the utility room for future utility needs or to hook Solar stuff to should a future president AOC decide to buy me solar panels for my south facing roof.

Wall mount Garage door openers.

Ran 3 lights to the outside of the front wall - 1 above each garage door for bright as hell switchable lights controlled from a 3 way circuit between the man doors and one in the middle for an always powered motion sensor light (probably with a camera).

One light in the middle of the garage separate from the rest of the circuit to stay on all the time for security/being able to walk through without invoking the luminosity of a thousand suns.

If you live in a winter climate, consider snow removal. I can get my plow within inches of every door. I see many people screw this up.

Horseshoe driveway for easy trailer access.

Eventually I want to write a build thread, but I'm close to 18 months behind, so I figure my time is better spent, you know, building.

Also-I agree with the comments about Gutters - They don't work too well up here with lots of snow. Maybe everyone I've seen was just poorly installed, but they always seem to end up on the ground.
 

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Question though: For those of you with exhaust fans for heated space - do the regular louvered ones lead to crazy heat loss when they aren't running? I want to install one, but I'm afraid of it causing cold spot problems in the wall....
 

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More power. If you think 200 amp service will do, get 400 amp.

This might depend on your location but for me, central air in both house and shop are a must, also in-floor radiant heating in the shop with a lift.
What could you possibly need a 400 amp service for? :shaking:

That's 96000 watts, or 128 horsepower.

You cannot afford to need that much power.
 

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Discussion Starter #74
The shop will be a pole barn with steel sides & roof, and the house will be a steel snap lock roof with no gutters. Most likely a 4:12 pitch.
 

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Question though: For those of you with exhaust fans for heated space - do the regular louvered ones lead to crazy heat loss when they aren't running? I want to install one, but I'm afraid of it causing cold spot problems in the wall....
My old house in the winter the metal frame of the exhaust fan would condense moisture and drip. I would have to put a sheet of plastic and insulation over it
 

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Around here I wouldn't even consider insulating a personal garage/shop. It would just lead to more sweating when the temperature changes rapidly. A heated shop would be nice but is not in any way necessary in New England.
I'm not following. :confused:

My last shop (30x60) had uninsulated doors, one end (30×20) uninsulated walls and torn/damaged insulation everywhere else. It sweated like a pig. I insulated the doors, the rest of the interior, and walled up the inside. The sweating stopped completely.

Sure, if I had the doors open all day and there was a big temp swing it may sweat a little... but only with the doors open.

In this part of the US an uninsulated shop is a rust sauna.
 

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Man Child
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I'm just finishing my new home and shop build. I haven't moved in yet, but the things I really like are:

- High ceilings. Makes rooms feel bigger. Great room is vaulted to 12' and the rest of the house is 9'.

- Layout. I have the mudroom, laundry, master closet, master bath and master suite all connected and it flows really nicely.

- Pull through bay on the shop.

- plenty of outlets in the ceiling of the shop.

Edit: this is actually the old plan I just realized. I swapped the closet and bathroom positions...and added a man door to the back yard opposite the basement stairs.
 

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Around here I wouldn't even consider insulating a personal garage/shop. It would just lead to more sweating when the temperature changes rapidly. A heated shop would be nice but is not in any way necessary in New England.
Do you mean equipment sweating or people? Cause in my old unheated shop in NC my anvil would sweat in the cooler months when there would be 30* temp swings. Some of that has to do with the humidity but I'd rather not have large temp swings in my shop in general. It's hard on things and promotes rust.
 
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