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Union Fab Works
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4,448 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Picking up this lathe... can't find much info about it online. Saw a couple for sale but can't find any general information about it....

It's a gap bed, with it removed it can get to about 25" turn. Everything on it is perfect, tight and no play. Could use a paint job, which i'm trying to find info about doing now...

It's production date is June of 1979, Out of Taiwan, ROC.

Anyway, here's some pics. this is in the P.O.'s shop, hasn't been moved yet.

Anybody help with any info on this, or where i can find any documentation or paperwork, etc?

















It has a Mitutoyo DRO, works perfect. Comes with the 3 jaw truck, a large selection of jaws, tool holder, tooling, etc... I got it for a super deal... gonna suck to move it tho, weighs over 3 tons.
 

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Premium Member
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6,712 Posts
No info, but holy shit... thats a sweet lathe dude. Is that a servo shift head?
 

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Registered
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3,803 Posts
looks like a nice one...

how big is the spindle bore-?

--Sherpa
 

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Registered
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233 Posts
Ive never heard of the brand before, but it looks nice and beefy. Unless my sense of proportion is messed up, that's no toy. What size chuck is that and what series QC tool post? 'm guessing a 10" 3 jaw and a CA sized post.

The steady rest makes it an even sweeter find. I don't use my steady a lot, but when I do there's usually no work around.
 

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Union Fab Works
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4,448 Posts
Discussion Starter #8
it's no toy or hobby lathe that's for sure. It is 11 feet long, and almost 4 feet wide. Entire bottom is cast, chip tray and all. That chuck is a 16" and the toolpost im not sure on. Is there a 3/4" ? 1" ? I dunno.

It's more lathe than i was looking for, but for the price i couldn't pass it up, with the DRO and all, I'm way ahead on money already.

Here's one with no DRO, no toolpost or insert holders and no steady rest for $8k...

http://www.reliabletoolmachine.com/tashing.html

so, for $2k with all it comes with, i feel like it did pretty well.
 

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Nose to grindstone
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8,178 Posts
Watch for

1. Bad bearings
2. Poor gear quality
3. Poor cut finishes
4. Proper lube in the head and carraige
 

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Nose to grindstone
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8,178 Posts
I would especially look for those items with this lathe. The wrong gear lube can leave large coking in the gear box and since it says Taiwan (China's republic) means it is in those tender years for Taiwan goods.
 

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Union Fab Works
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4,448 Posts
Discussion Starter #13
advice taken, thanks. I would love to find someone that has first hand experience with this actual brand of machine... i don't see hardly any info on line or anywhere else. Even Practical Machinist has no info for me on Ta Shing.

This machine has done a lot of work for the P.O. and he swears by it. Used it as a production machine in his shop next to American iron for years.
 

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Premium Member
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2,950 Posts
Going big on a lathe is the way to go. What hp is it?
Looks like it's going to take a big phase converter.
It's a 10hp machine.

I went with Carwash and looked at this set-up , for the money he spent he did pretty good. Buying a 30 year old machine always has some risks but it oils good , sounds good and has better than average spindle bearings.

I'm also interested in what some peoples opinions are as to the size and type converter to run.... static or rotary?

Does a phase converter need to be rated to 100% of equipment hp?


Mike , you can have your thread back..:D
 

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Registered
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5,188 Posts
I spent a lot of time on factories in Taiwan, and that is a good lathe. The southern part of Taiwan was heavily influenced by the Japanese (occupation), and many of the machine shops were owned by the Japanese.

I never ran the machines there, but I know what my vendors could turn out....
 

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Union Fab Works
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4,448 Posts
Discussion Starter #17
i was hoping someone would tell me it was more japanese than chinese... not gonna lie, when i saw the name Ta Shing it scared me.

Jeff, talked to Malcom today and he says forget the static phase converter, says i will never get to use the machine at its full power. he told me to get a rotary that includes a motor that is rated for 10 hp. I think that means the motor has to be 2/3 that, which would be around 7 hp or so...

I guess i need to get knee deep in the Phase Converter forums over at Practical Machinist... ugh, my plate gets more full every day.
 

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OG13 King
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7,883 Posts
It's a 10hp machine.

I went with Carwash and looked at this set-up , for the money he spent he did pretty good. Buying a 30 year old machine always has some risks but it oils good , sounds good and has better than average spindle bearings.

I'm also interested in what some peoples opinions are as to the size and type converter to run.... static or rotary?

Does a phase converter need to be rated to 100% of equipment hp?


Mike , you can have your thread back..:D
Well, this is where a little cash outlay is going to take place.
I'm assuming it's a 10 hp 22ov 3 phase motor.

If the lathe doesn't have a clutch, then it's a hard start operation.
You might be able to pull off a static converter, but if you have other 3 phase equipment, you might want to just get a rotary.
Check out this sample place for prices.
http://www.americanrotary.com/rotary-phase-converters.html
It's where I got mine, but as you can see, it's going to be spendy.
It's recommended that you have 2-1/2 times the hp rating on the converter as the actually machine has.
I'd start shopping for used converters. A 30 hp rotary converter is about $1,800
 

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1,454 Posts
You need 1/3 bigger motor for your converter then th emachine rating. Build your own. It is easy and will save you a ton of money. Look for a used 3 phase motor and go from there. I have a static converter on my mill and am gonna use it to start my rotary motor. Look around plenty of DIY stuff on converters.

Toddy
 
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