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They even had one in the star trek movie a few years ago.
 

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One of my Jeeps was a 77 CJ7 with the original 304 worn nylo-gear and headers. Mods included bigger tires and camo green paint. It was offensive to the eyes and ears and I miss it. Downshifting from 3rd to 2nd and unholy fire spewed from the burned out glasspacks. I remeber the respect it got in traffic..especially at night. Anyway, the point here is the first time I saw this omni-wheel I was hooked on the concept. I was in Engineering at Airtrax until they ceased manufacturing in 2008. While the Airtrax forklift is no longer in production, we (VETEX) continues to build custom vehicles using the technology. This wheel is designed for lower speeds <10mph and smooth hard surfaces allowing for almost limitless maneuverbility. Despite its excellent climbing characteristic and agressive looking profile................... Your not going to win any of the Hammers with it.... but the tech used to make it go might be of some interest..... So, I figured I'd mention it here since someone seemed curious about the Sidewinder. Each of the 4 wheels are independently driven by electric motors and use gear reduction. Some ratios are at 35:1 and some as high as 112:1 in roughly the same physical space as the planetary gearset in your transfer case. While typical ratios are 2.72 to 4.00 in the T-case. What if you needed to go ultra low? Strength limitations on the pinion stops you around 4.73 on factory axles, combo T-cases or having deep pockets for that Atlas are options... We use Cycloidal drives to reach our torque and speed requirements.. I'm sure most of you understand how a typical planetary gearset works and the limitations on its output.. I've included a link visually explaining the Cyclo. Cyclo-Getriebe Simulation - YouTube The potential for applications is there... Ultra beefy winch anyone? Just figured I'd share some info..
 

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One of my Jeeps was a 77 CJ7 with the original 304 worn nylo-gear and headers. Mods included bigger tires and camo green paint. It was offensive to the eyes and ears and I miss it. Downshifting from 3rd to 2nd and unholy fire spewed from the burned out glasspacks. I remeber the respect it got in traffic..especially at night. Anyway, the point here is the first time I saw this omni-wheel I was hooked on the concept. I was in Engineering at Airtrax until they ceased manufacturing in 2008. While the Airtrax forklift is no longer in production, we (VETEX) continues to build custom vehicles using the technology. This wheel is designed for lower speeds <10mph and smooth hard surfaces allowing for almost limitless maneuverbility. Despite its excellent climbing characteristic and agressive looking profile................... Your not going to win any of the Hammers with it.... but the tech used to make it go might be of some interest..... So, I figured I'd mention it here since someone seemed curious about the Sidewinder. Each of the 4 wheels are independently driven by electric motors and use gear reduction. Some ratios are at 35:1 and some as high as 112:1 in roughly the same physical space as the planetary gearset in your transfer case. While typical ratios are 2.72 to 4.00 in the T-case. What if you needed to go ultra low? Strength limitations on the pinion stops you around 4.73 on factory axles, combo T-cases or having deep pockets for that Atlas are options... We use Cycloidal drives to reach our torque and speed requirements.. I'm sure most of you understand how a typical planetary gearset works and the limitations on its output.. I've included a link visually explaining the Cyclo. Cyclo-Getriebe Simulation - YouTube The potential for applications is there... Ultra beefy winch anyone? Just figured I'd share some info..
Paragraphs, please. That hurt my eyes.
 

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One of my Jeeps was a 77 CJ7 with the original 304 worn nylo-gear and headers. Mods included bigger tires and camo green paint. It was offensive to the eyes and ears and I miss it. Downshifting from 3rd to 2nd and unholy fire spewed from the burned out glasspacks. I remeber the respect it got in traffic..especially at night. Anyway, the point here is the first time I saw this omni-wheel I was hooked on the concept. I was in Engineering at Airtrax until they ceased manufacturing in 2008. While the Airtrax forklift is no longer in production, we (VETEX) continues to build custom vehicles using the technology. This wheel is designed for lower speeds <10mph and smooth hard surfaces allowing for almost limitless maneuverbility. Despite its excellent climbing characteristic and agressive looking profile................... Your not going to win any of the Hammers with it.... but the tech used to make it go might be of some interest..... So, I figured I'd mention it here since someone seemed curious about the Sidewinder. Each of the 4 wheels are independently driven by electric motors and use gear reduction. Some ratios are at 35:1 and some as high as 112:1 in roughly the same physical space as the planetary gearset in your transfer case. While typical ratios are 2.72 to 4.00 in the T-case. What if you needed to go ultra low? Strength limitations on the pinion stops you around 4.73 on factory axles, combo T-cases or having deep pockets for that Atlas are options... We use Cycloidal drives to reach our torque and speed requirements.. I'm sure most of you understand how a typical planetary gearset works and the limitations on its output.. I've included a link visually explaining the Cyclo. Cyclo-Getriebe Simulation - YouTube The potential for applications is there... Ultra beefy winch anyone? Just figured I'd share some info..


That's incredibly awesome. Thankyou!! I wish that in that video the mechanisms were stripped so you could see more how they were moving. The solid colors take away from all the coolness going on that you can barely see.
 

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I have no clue what you just said. :confused:
if he's talking about the old sickle mowers, they stick off the side of the tractor vs trailing behind it so 7 ft mower would make the tractor 13ft wide
 
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