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This coming weekend I and a couple of other LSLC guys are doing a newbie training course on Sat morning, I am going to make a list of do's and don'ts and print to hand out.
If there is one or two things you wish someone had told you at the begining or something you think should be taught every newbie, type them in below, I know this would be a great chance for jokes and to poke fun at Nolen, however do me a favour and keep this serious so's I don't have to wade thru the junk.......
Butch
 

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1. Avoid M.E.S.S. (Multiple Enthusiastic Spotter Syndrome). Pick one spotter and stick with him or her, zoning out all the other "volunteers". Make sure you go over the hand signals with your spotter before the run.

2. When going over an obstacle in 4LO, don't use the clutch. If the vehicle stalls, let the starter get it moving, then gently feather it to get back going.

3. When crossing deep water, don't attack it like on an SUV commercial, hit it at a constant speed, fast enough to keep momentum but slow enough to avoid getting water all over the engine compartment. If the vehicle starts to sputter while crossing a body of water, KILL THE ENGINE and get it towed out, don't risk hydrolocking the engine.

4. Use a diagonal approach when crossing ditches or going over logs and tall berms to avoid getting high-centered.

5. KNOW your vehicle. Figure out where all the tow/recovery points are. Learn to quickly go over all the systems (brakes, drivetrain, suspension, wheels/tires) before and after every trail run.

6. SECURE your equipment. Even the best wheelers occasionallly roll (Obligatory Nolen Pun), so make sure your gear is stowed securely. This includes everything from a tool box to a cooler. I cannot emphasize this one enough.

7. Recovery gear. It's not enough to have a Hi-Lift jack, know how to use it and give it a lot of respect! Make sure you have the right recovery gear, and know how to use it. Same goes for a winch, make sure everyone understands how to use it. Carry tree savers and d-rings, and a snatch-block. Learn to improvise if you can't reach a secure winching point (like burying the spare).

8. Aim for the high point! Putting a tire on TOP of a rock is not a natural inclination, most beginners try to skirt around it. Explain about under-carriage clearance.

9. Use the gearing rather than the throttle. Pretty self-explanatory and probably one of the most commonly ignored principles of offroad driving, but it's important for newbies to understand it.

I can't think of anything else right now and The Simpsons are on, gotta go! :flipoff2:
 

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keep all hands and feet in the truck at all times. unless your buddy is giving you a beer or some kind of hand jester. :flipoff2: :flipoff2: :flipoff2:
 

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60seriesguy said:
1. Avoid M.E.S.S. (Multiple Enthusiastic Spotter Syndrome). Pick one spotter and stick with him or her, zoning out all the other "volunteers". Make sure you go over the hand signals with your spotter before the run.

2. When going over an obstacle in 4LO, don't use the clutch. If the vehicle stalls, let the starter get it moving, then gently feather it to get back going.

3. When crossing deep water, don't attack it like on an SUV commercial, hit it at a constant speed, fast enough to keep momentum but slow enough to avoid getting water all over the engine compartment. If the vehicle starts to sputter while crossing a body of water, KILL THE ENGINE and get it towed out, don't risk hydrolocking the engine.

4. Use a diagonal approach when crossing ditches or going over logs and tall berms to avoid getting high-centered.

5. KNOW your vehicle. Figure out where all the tow/recovery points are. Learn to quickly go over all the systems (brakes, drivetrain, suspension, wheels/tires) before and after every trail run.

6. SECURE your equipment. Even the best wheelers occasionallly roll (Obligatory Nolen Pun), so make sure your gear is stowed securely. This includes everything from a tool box to a cooler. I cannot emphasize this one enough.

7. Recovery gear. It's not enough to have a Hi-Lift jack, know how to use it and give it a lot of respect! Make sure you have the right recovery gear, and know how to use it. Same goes for a winch, make sure everyone understands how to use it. Carry tree savers and d-rings, and a snatch-block. Learn to improvise if you can't reach a secure winching point (like burying the spare).

8. Aim for the high point! Putting a tire on TOP of a rock is not a natural inclination, most beginners try to skirt around it. Explain about under-carriage clearance.

9. Use the gearing rather than the throttle. Pretty self-explanatory and probably one of the most commonly ignored principles of offroad driving, but it's important for newbies to understand it.

I can't think of anything else right now and The Simpsons are on, gotta go! :flipoff2:
You coming up Henry?
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Henry I want to know also, I sure could use you to help teach the newbies..........tried PM'n you but your inbox is full.....
you know if you don't show you'll be campfire fodder:flipoff2:
Butch
 

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Yes let's do something to get him there. I told him I would even lend him my truck so we could both wheel. He has got an empty seat in my truck if he wants to go. Butch, Nolen at what time are you guys arriving. I will get there pretty early. Do you guys know where in the state park you guys are going to camp at? By the way do we need to get an ORV sticker Pass whatever you call it?

:flipoff2:
 

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I forgot do you guys want me to bring anything to help out. I'll be bringing a half to a full rick (sp) of wood. Anything else? More or less wood? :flipoff2:
 

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Lego said:
Yes let's do something to get him there. I told him I would even lend him my truck so we could both wheel. He has got an empty seat in my truck if he wants to go. Butch, Nolen at what time are you guys arriving. I will get there pretty early. Do you guys know where in the state park you guys are going to camp at? By the way do we need to get an ORV sticker Pass whatever you call it?

:flipoff2:
No Pass needed for Saturday, $10 day use fee to Mr Freilling. As for Sunday, the group is heading to the WMA area and you will need the yearly pass for that.

When you get to the Park, just take your first right and head to the spillway, that is where we will be.
 

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Going down a steap incline don't hit the brakes...use the gearing...understand your vehicle limits and bring spare parts....
 

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Thumbs on the steering wheel. Not wrapped around it.
Do not grab the cage.. Ever..


WATCH and listen to your spotter. Sometimes even good spotters make the "My left, your Right" mistake but they are usually pointing in the right direction.

The first time you put your rig in low range you do NOT have to rev it up and dump the clutch (how many have seen/done this..)

I'll think about more later.
 

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I thought of some more good info:

1. If you're in doubt, WALK the line before you DRIVE it. For those of you that have been wheeling a long time, picking out the right line comes naturally, but if you're only beginning to wheel, it's not always so easy or so logical. If you don't feel confident, stop the truck, get out, walk the line, try to picture the line you're going to take, then get back in the truck and try it.

2. This one is Cruiser-specific. If you're driving a wagon, make sure the spotter understands that, especially on tough obstacles. Sometimes the line between a SWB and a LWB Cruiser are radically different (Rocker Knocker on Pritchett Canyon, for example) and the last thing you want is a spotter who doesn't understand the difference.

3. Trail courtesy. If you're wheeling with a large group and it's a long trail, practice the THREE TRIES and you're out rule. When you come up to an obstacle, give it your best. If you don't succeed, try it another couple of times, but after that take the bypass or pull some line or ask for a towstrap. It SUCKS when people get frustrated and take on an obstacle over and over and over while a huge group sits around and waits...

4. Safety. When someone's winching, STAY clear from the winch cable, step away from both vehicles, and make sure your passengers are clear as well. I can't tell you how many times I've seen a driver be careful with his own rig but then stand dangerously close to another one. The same applies when one rig is using a towstrap to pull another one or when a rig is approaching the crest of a steep climb, normally the driver can't see what's directly in front of him.

5. Electrics. LEGO, this one's for you. My dad had a loaded rig burn out from under him in the middle of the Venezuelan outback, 1,500 kilometers away from home. Truck, guns, gears, everything burned because of an electrical fire, the result of poorly-installed accessories. When you show up for a trail ride, it's not just your own safety you have to keep in mind, it's *everyone's*. Make sure your batteries are securedly tied down, that you don't have sketchy electrics, and that you have OPERATIONAL fire extinguishers, secured and easily accessible.

6. Be prepared. I've never been an advocate of bringing everything but the kitchen sink, the realities of four wheeling dictate that you bring what you can without overloading a vehicle. What you need to do is step back and think of what needs attention on your rig, what's likely to fail during a wheeling trip, what can immobilize a rig on the trail and what you can easily carry with you. For example, a spare carburator may be overkill, but a carb kit is small enough that it can be tucked away for an emergency. If you just replaced all the belts on your Cruiser, you might not need to bring a whole spare set, maybe just the ones you need to get back home. Same goes for tools, bring a *reasonable* amount of tools. This varies wildly depending on the rig, the type of wheeling, level of modification, and overall condition.

7. Duct tape, baling wire, epoxy (JB Weld), electrical tape and good zip ties go without saying, those should be present on EVERY vehicle.

8. One system that's worked out really well for me is separating my spares/tools by system. For example, I keep all my electrical tools/spares in a separate box, my tire repair stuff (patches, plugs, plug tools, valve core stems, valve core tool, spare stems, inner tube, tire irons) in a separate bag, my Birfield kit (big socket, bearings/seals kit, tub of grease, gloves, brass drifts, fish scale) in another, etc... It's alot easier to get to stuff without unpacking the whole truck, and it makes it tougher to lose tools on a dark trail (since invariably, repairs come at night!)! :)
 

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Are you saying that that's where I got my trucks name FYRBOMB. I hope I don't ever have to find out.:flipoff2: :flipoff2:
 

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1. you don't need 44" tires to go wheeling
 

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driving skills and a simple truck will get you further than a $$$ truck and no talent...learn on a near-stocker and impress your friends with big-dollar rigs and no driving style.

Reply on yourself to get un-stuck...own a tow-strap, screw-clevises, and know how to hook them safely.

First aid kits and a CB should be required equipnment.

Always always make sure the tree you winch to is alive. (don't ask me how I know this one...)
 

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My Newbie advice:
Air down your tires.

Air them down, until you see the side walls start to buldge. Going from 32psi to 25psi doesn't count.

It drives me nuts to watch someone spinning rock hard tires. It tears up the trail too.
 

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Be sure to turn in the direction of the down slope. This is really important when you're getting ready to flop over (like Nolen)..

If going head first down a very steep hill/obstacle, hit the throttle if you think your rear end come up. Also, don't press too hard on the brakes as this may cause the rear end to come up.
 

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Well, Henry covered everything I would have suggested, except for one, and then Woddy got that one. I think the best advice for wheelin' newbies is that a dead stock land cruiser is a fine fine vehicle, and most of your time in the beginning should be spent getting to know yourself, your rig, your preferences, and learn how to read terrain. You may not need 36's and everybolton/weld on there is to have as much fun as you care to, and we've all seen instances of a really well piloted rig on 31's going right thru stuff the the "wallet built" rig jsut had a lot of trouble with...Alan in tornadoalley-who still feels like a trail newbie on some days, even after ~20 years with cruisers...
 
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