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If you meant what "are" those lines, they are probably air lines.
doh! :homer:

Are you mounting the transmission to the body with that cheezy looking piece of flat bar?

I truly hope that is not permanent. You need to build a lot beefier mount if you expect that to last, not to mention not wanting it to rip the floor out of the truck.
ummm... mebbe i dont spell or type too good but im pretty sure that mount is to support the seats or the new tranny tunnel or something,not the floor supporting the tranny. wow...

anyway,im thinkin we should prolly let the man finish up his build thread before we criticize.
 

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Pretty sure that flat bar (spring actually) rests on top of the frame rails of the pickup. That is where they rest on the big truck the trans came out of. Supports the back of the trans.
I think that is the part he had to make spacers for that he mentioned earlier.:shaking:
Has to flex some since engine is supported up front and at the flywheel housing.
 

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Discussion Starter #24
The main supports for the transmission are at the clutch housing. That rear bar is a spring type mount, and of course goes to mounts on the frame not the body.

There are two large studs on the top of big truck transmissions that help support the rear of the transmission. They go to either a spring steel leaf that spans the frame rails, as I'm using, or to a solid bracket using large coil springs to a solid crossmember. as I said above, if I ever redo the rear mount, that's the one thing I would change. Whether you think so or not, there are no strength issues with this setup, it is as it is done from the factory in all heavy trucks.



No idea what the trans came out of, but they were common in Ford Louisvilles and F700s among others. The clutch housing can come out of anything with a SAE #2 trans powered by a B series Cummins, there are a lot of them in class 5-6 trucks.

Yes, those are the air lines to control the range shifting and splitter.

As for the 13 versus an 8, 9, or 10 - exact same level of difficulty (air, mounts, pull mechanical clutch, SAE bell, etc etc) but the RTOO gives me a .62 top gear which is the same final drive as throwing 3.55s in my truck. I've always gotten terrible milage with this truck. I've got 88 tanks of fuel in my logs, 10 have been over 15mpg. Two of those are 16.4 on my way from NY to MN just now. I've never done this trip unloaded so I don't have a direct comparison to make. I'm hoping to improve on my usual 10.5-12.5 when towing too but I won't know about that for a little while. In any case it's nice to be in my power band at a 2000RPM cruise instead of over it at 2500RPM to do 73.

Now, on with the build....
 

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Discussion Starter #25
Pretty sure that flat bar (spring actually) rests on top of the frame rails of the pickup. That is where they rest on the big truck the trans came out of. Supports the back of the trans.
I think that is the part he had to make spacers for that he mentioned earlier.:shaking:
Has to flex some since engine is supported up front and at the flywheel housing.
Thanks for having a clue :beer:

:flipoff2: to those who didn't get it the first time around :D
 

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Discussion Starter #26
So when we left our fearless builder, the trans was hung and the clutch was all set. No air, no shifter, no starter, no drivelines.... and less than a week to a planned Minnesota trip.

As I touched on, the starter was a toughie. The stocker hit the block. I tried to shave it down, but couldn't take off as much meat as I needed to without removing all the body that one of the electric motor studs threads into. The boss it was hitting is the one best lit in the photo below.

The starter I got with the clutch housing was very into the frame, and I couldn't flip it 180˚*since it, too, hit the block.

I found a high torque starter (as opposed to gear reduction) that was smaller, with an in-line motor, for a Ford Cummins application via DB Electric. I had to trim the end of the engine mount bolt off, and remove a small gusset on the stock engine mount that you can see in the pic below (not worried with the addition of the beefy clutch housing mount) to get it to clear, but it then mounted up, and just barely cleared the frame.

I also had to switch around the battery cables to hook up the passenger side starter. That was quite simple, I just had to swap the positive cables on each battery around and extend the solenoid trigger over to the passenger side.
 

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Discussion Starter #27
Driveline was pretty easy. Stock setup is 4x.095 tube, there is a 1710 Spicer yoke for 4x.134 tube. I had my driveline shop shave down the slip stub to fit the 4x.134 tube and retubed the shaft from the carrier bearing forward. Reminder that for the moment the truck is a two wheel drive. When I put a tcase back in, I'll have the front half of the shaft shortened and keep the front two existing joints and slip, and go into the 205, then have a new complete rear shaft made to run from the case to the rear axle. I'm hoping I can put the case far enough back to have the rear shaft be one piece. If I'm really lucky a single piece front will be able to happen as well, but I'm not betting on that :D

In the second pic you can see a new yellow line, that's my air feed line. I got a 12v Thomas compressor mounted on the inner fender right next to the PDC under the hood. It outputs to a manifold with the pressure switch right there. I have the power side of a relay running straight from the battery to a 30a fuse and the compressor, and the trigger side running from ignion switched power through a 75/100psi switch from an old HF compressor. That cheapie's tank is mounted to the passenger side framerail.

You may have noticed that the starter completely fills up where the exhaust used to go. I forgot to take any pictures of it since it was one of the last things I did, but I cut up my stock system and reused the pieces for a straight dump from the turbo down out the fender well and back through most of the same 3" system with 5" expansion chamber, dumping behind the cab under the bed. No drone, no complaints.
 

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Discussion Starter #28
The shifter was a bit tall to begin with. A couple bends and cuts and it was good to go. This brings us to Thursday, and a test drive. Plenty of unsynchrod gear grinding, but it was a 97% success from a functionality perspective. The 3% is that I didn't guess right on the speedometer hookup: I had the 2 wires reversed. The stock speedo is a 3 wire hookup; the Eaton uses a two wire, so the ground is ignored. Once I flipped the wires, the signal was monstrously off: much too fast. I knew a Dakota Digital SGI-5 was my answer, but couldn't find one in stock around Rochester. A smart friend suggested picking one up at Summit in Akron on my way to MN, so I placed a will-call order and prepared for on the road installation by running the signal and to-PCM wires to the dash, and giving myself a +12v and ground as well.

Then all that was left was sealing it all up.... That ended up being more time consuming than I expected.
 

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Discussion Starter #29
All hand bent on my workbench, trimmed, tacked in the truck, and full welded in the driveway. The bottom side has a quart of Herculiner on it, and the top side is Dynomatted.

The carpet ended up pretty lumpy but fits well enough for now. Both seat bases ended up needing some trimming. The passenger seat needs further work, with the slider track hitting the doghouse. I'm going to flip the riser and track so it can slide forward again for good rear seat ingress/egress.
 

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I ended up finishing up late on Saturday night, slept in, and left for Minnesota midday Sunday for Akron and Summit, needing to make the 290 miles before 21:00 to catch them before closing time.

Everything went smoothly until running 271 south past Cleveland. I heard an air line pop off, and checked my gauge and saw 0psi. I had 30-40 miles to go to Summit; I quickly remembered that I'd left my extra air fittings in my garage. I wasn't sure where anything had failed, and I wasn't sure exactly what would happen with no air pressure.

As I was thinking about how far it might be to the next Lowes/ Home Depot/ whatever, it fell out of range into no-man's land. I had an exit ramp to coast down and pulled over to investigate. I had quite a stack of failures to deal with.....

- I'd forgotten about a temp fitting I used going to the 2 gallon tank. I was out of hose barbs, and used an air tool as a mockup fitting. It didn't leak, and I'd forgotten about it... The air line popped off there and the hose clamps vacated.
- I borrowed a clamp off the compressor, but couldn't get it to hold. Stole another doubled clamp, but then it popped off the compressor.
- I replumbed the system to skip the tank, using the tank drain as a plug for that port, and replaced the extra clamps up at the compressor.
- System was now holding 100psi, but the shifter controls were doing nothing. Still in no-man's land range.

I couldn't figure out what was wrong. I started tracing every line under the sun, looking for anything out of place, looking for any way to plumb it to force high range - but discovered wrong fitting sizes.... And I had no adaptors.

I finally discovered the root of the issue. There's a filter/regulator on the air supply to the transmission, and the cap and spring vacated, allowing no pressure to the trans lines. I really, really lucked out and the plunger was still there, otherwise I'd have been truely stuck. I called the only nearby fleet service place Google found for me and he had nothing for me; expecting the closest part would be in Youngstown...

I tried a couple different socket-and-ziptie combinations but every time I applied pressure it would spit the sockets out. What ended up working just barely well enough to hold in in range was just a zip tie alone. I left it in high and didn't split since even the range shift took 2-3 seconds, but it was enough to get me down to road to a Lowe's.

1" NPT was about right for the cap; the first one I grabbed was a bit too large an OD, but the second one - along with a spring from my flashlight - did the trick. The threads didn't match but it went on well enough, and with a zip tie safety it got me shifting right and back on the road.

I made it to Summit just in time (20:30), wandered a bit (my first time there) and then spent about 45 minutes driving in circles around their parking lot to get the SGI-5 set right. I had no clue what sort of signal the '97 Dodge PCM was looking for. Not knowing my final goal and having never screwed around with an SGI-5 before I had to do a lot of trial and error to choose the right output. For future reference I needed to use the 4000 pulse per mile output. I got it close in the parking lot, and tweaked it using the cruise control once I was back on the interstate. That put me within 4%, and then I clocked the odometer versus my GPS for an exact setting.

Tooling across Wisconsin on my last leg it seemed to me that the trans was getting warmer than it should - but I really had nothing to go off of. I'm just using a towel for a shift boot at this point, so I get more heat and scent leak than I really should, but even the shift lever was getting warm. All I had to go on was "hot" though - not real accurate when spec dictates that anything under 250˚F is an acceptable temp per Eaton. After I got to MN, I checked my fluid level and it was good; I picked up a water temp/oil pressure combo gauge pod from O'Riely's and now have a better positioned, lit, and matching air pressure and trans temp gauges. Tooling around town here in MN I've seen it get only to 170˚. I don't think I have anything to worry about, but now I can put a number on it and will know whether I have something to worry about.
 

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So that's where I stand today. I have a few things left to do:

- I'd like to add more sound deadening. My current plan is some stall mat rubber over the front floor and tunnel, under the carpet. I also came across silentrunning.us/
- Shift boot; I'm thinking double wall/heavy rubber, with a leather overboot, and a housing around it that will cover the carpet holes and contain my switch for the tcase air shift.
- air dryer; I don't want freezing issues come wintertime.
- rearrange the passenger seat inboard slider so it can go forward again.

Otherwise, aside from rebuilding the divorced 205 I got and putting 1410 yokes on it, and dealing with the CAD, I'm pretty much all set.

I really can't wait to tow through the PA hills with it. With two rigs on my 36' trailer I often gross around 23,000 - now with the trans weight gain probably closer to 23,500 - so the closer ranges will be very, very nice. I'm rarely loosing gears now that I'm accustomed to the different shift pattern, and I'm really enjoying driving it.
 

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Cool you found the RTOO !!!! I wasn't aware of that one. Ratios look nice! Should work excellent for what you are doing with it!
I know guys that would have left the shift lever that long !!!:shaking:
 

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There is much win in this thread......epic swap man, i'd LOVE to try that....
 

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Great work...
should have used my Dyanamat!!!






Nice Job Mike.. glad to finally see pics!!:D
 

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Discussion Starter #35
It's all over the doghouse, Arie. Thanks again!

Like we talked about, I just need something with a bit more mass for the mid frequency noise.
 

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Look at lizard skin, then cover that with dynamat. I'd spray the floors and back of cab, then layer on sound proofing and make sure you do the doors.
What about just line-x on the entire floor pan after you seal it up? then put the carpet and seats back in?
 

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I would definitely put the heaviest, thickest stuff you can find on it. I don't think it's a real subtle problem like soundproofing a regular car - no matter what you do there's a monstrous collection of spinning gears right there, and the engine is producing a huge amount of heat. I'd do as much rubberized undercoating/thick-squishy-type bedliner on both sides as you can, with reflective foil insulation on the bottom of the truck/doghouse and a ton of carpet padding on top.
 

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This is one of those projects that I can't keep out of my head, I'm just not sure how well it'd fit in a first gen... I'm going to fix the 'rag one last time and if it dies again, I will be going 13 speed.
 
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