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Wish it was my job!
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Discussion Starter #1
On top of trying to keep a rig on the trial I also own a farm, which necessitates having the ability to weld in the field to maintain fencing, corrals, etc.

Until recently I owned a Lincoln 225 amp gas powered welder for this task, but I recently got rid of it because it was too hard to maintain it 12 months a year or its infrequent use.

I'm considering replacing it with a newer, smaller unit. I typically weld with 1/8 or 5/32 rod, so a 225 amp machine was way overkill.

Most of the units I've looked at will run between 1400 - 2000 dollars for a 100-170 amp machine.

Comparing that to the $1100 or so for a Premier Power Welder, I'm wondering if it would be a better option. That way I'm just having to maintain my trail rig, which I do anyway, and in the off chance I need to weld on the trail I can.

My concern is that the PPW can handle the chore. I know it's typically used by offroaders for the occasional small - medium repair. While I don't often do major fence repairs, I do occasionally have to run the machine for several hours at a time.

Does anyone use a PPW for this type of application or some other application where it's running more than a few hours a year on the trail? It seems like a win win for me if I can be sure it's up to the task.

Thanks for any input

Mike
 

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Premium Member
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I have had one for over 10 years, works great. I do not think you are supposed to run it for over 20-30 min at a time before recharging your batteries.
 

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I sure like mine. And ya, I let it cool down and charge back up after about 20 minutes or so. Never had any probs welding up all the jeeps...j/k!
 

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Wish it was my job!
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2,106 Posts
Discussion Starter #4
I have had one for over 10 years, works great. I do not think you are supposed to run it for over 20-30 min at a time before recharging your batteries.
Hmmmm,

That's the input I was looking for, but not the answer I was looking for :D

I was hoping based on this statement from their website that it could be run longer:
"Premier Power Welders allow you to weld stainless, mild or high-carbon steel and aluminum with no size or plate thickness limits. Premier's high-frequency pulsating DC current allows you utilization of any AC or DC electrode up through 1/8" at 100% duty cycle. The Premier allows both welding and battery charging using #4 cable leads up to 500' lengths with minimal loss of heat."

How long is this cooling off / recharge cycle after the 20 mins of welding? I figure between electrode changes and position / joint changes when doing fence work that the most I'd ever sustain would be about 70% duty cycle, but that could go for an hour or so easily after I had a section fitted and ready to weld.
 

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Wish it was my job!
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2,106 Posts
Discussion Starter #7
I saw that last night. I emailed a guy from Zena asking if I had to have a second alternator or if their system could run the vehicle electrical system and the welder. They say it can be used for both, but that you have to disconnect the generator from the battery when welding.

I'm going to call and get some more details about duty cycle, etc.

Thanks for all the inputs guys.

Mike
 

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#30 ProMod
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905 Posts
I do not mean to butt in or pitch a sale- I have a very well cared for, low hours premier power welder for sale in the tools section

I have had excellent results with stick welding and with running a ready welder with this unit off of a diesel and a straight six 4.0- never ran into duty cycle issues while doing the normal "prep- tack- weld- fit some more- tack- weld" kind of jobs- not sure on actual minutes of cycling but any work was 1/4" plate to 1/2" plate and lots of powering grinders and drill motors during the jobs and a fair amount of weld deposition per job

hope some of this helps
 

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I agree with all of the above. My PPW has been outstanding. I have welded many rigs together on the trail and have had no issues.(including some major front end repairs) If I was you I would call them as they are very helpfull on these issues. Let them know what you are doing and they will tell you if it will fly. Tim "toolman"
 

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I have the ready welder, and have had it for years. I have performed trail fixes and done garage welding with it. If you need to stay mobile, it is a very CHEAP option. I got mine for about $450.

Casey
 

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i did a dana 60 swap with my premier a while back. i burned in a lot of 1/4" brackets. all the plastic parts on the premier dont like a long hot weld, but as far as function goes, if the darn batteries would have kept up the welder would have kept welding.

for the money i dont think you can go wrong.

as for function, id prefer a stick welder for what it sounds like you are doing. good old
60xx series rod will burn through anything, while the mig ppw doesnt get along all that great with dirty metal, but it will do it.
 

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When you are welding your vehicle battery is disconnected from the alternator. A good battery can run for a long time before it needs to be topped off. When you do go back to charging the battery, you have a 160 amp alt doing it. I would not worry too much about it.
 
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