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Discussion Starter #41
Got a little more done on the fenders this weekend - as usual, everything takes much longer than originally planned. I was originally planning to use a countersunk head bolt to hold the fender tube to the grill hoop, but with the angle of the hoop at that point, and the 0.120" thick wall there was no way to countersink the head far enough to be flush.

So I turned up a thick washer and cut the backside with a 1.75" radius at a 23 degree tilt so that it would match the contour of the grill hoop. I would rather have a little more than just one bolt holding the front of the fender, but it's got pretty good clamping force with the washer and it shouldn't really see a lot of force in everyday use.



Tacked up the horizontal tube to the flat bar that bolts to the tub and got the vertical bar bent and tacked up:







Next step is to cut the 12 gauge plate for the side and top and then get everything welded up and repeat the whole process for the driver's fender. Planning to do some type of ventilation panel in the side panel, but haven't decided whether to go with a perforated panel like the Genright one on my old fenders or something like a stainless steel mesh. McMaster Carr has both materials, just need to decide on what would look best.
 

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Discussion Starter #42
Slowly working on finishing the hi-line fenders, looks like they will be finished up this weekend. Ended up going with a perforated aluminum panel with 1/4" holes on 3/8" centers.





I still drive this rig on the street, so needed to have some turn signals. On the old fenders I was using a 3/4" LED turn signal, and so just needed a similar bracket on the new fenders. At the same time, I wasn't 100% happy with just having a single bolt holding the front of the tube to the grill hoop, so figured out a way to add a little more strength to the joint. The front triangular gusset is welded to the fender along the top edge, and then another tab is welded to the grill hoop and two 5/16" button head bolts clamp the two pieces together. Both pieces are 1/8" material, so it should add a little more strength to the front joint.



 

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Discussion Starter #43
Finally able to start spending some time on the build and post some updates - not that anyone is actually paying any attention...

Finished up the hood by painting the cut edges and installing some rubber molding to protect the fingers:



Also got the hood pins installed. The Daystar hood pins didn't come with any sort of retaining wire for the locking clip, so I raided my wife's bead bracelet making supplies for some fine gauge polymer coated stainless wire and miniature crimps. Seems like it will work fine. I really didn't see a need for any thicker wire, it's plenty strong to keep the clip hanging around :)





This weekend I started working on the radiator mount. I abandoned the idea for mounting off the cross tube at the bottom of the shock hoops. The just wasn't a lot of room with the 6 cylinder engine and trying to fit the radiator into the space in front of the tube just wasn't happening. The other thing I was concerned about was whether that tube would get in the way if/when I swap engines. Fortunately, I hadn't even tacked it, in, so a couple a swings of the hammer and it was removed.

After spending way to much time thinking about it, I came up with an idea that seems to work. The channel in the top of the Griffin radiator is just a touch over 2" wide, so a piece of 1x2 x1/8" wall box tubing would fit perfectly. The only problem I had was that the nylock nuts for #8 machine screws I was using to mount the shroud were inside that channel. So I used a 1/2" 2 lip cutter in the mill and made some pockets for the nuts:





Added a few speed holes, since less weight = more speed, I probably picked up at least 55 mph on the top end with all the weight I saved with these four holes :)

 

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Discussion Starter #44
On the passenger side I used a piece of 2.5" angle welded to the inside frame rail to provide a spot to bolt the radiator support to, but the driver's side was a little more crowded with the steering box/shaft, so I just used a piece of 3/16" flat bar and added a little gusset to strengthen it up. Underneath was a small piece of 3/8" plate with a 3/8"-16 hole drilled and tapped for the bolt







One thing I did notice was that I probably need to take a little time and clean up my messes. As I was cutting out the pieces of 1/8" for the cups that hold the radiator corners I glanced down at the floor around the saw :(



Looks like the radiator fits fine, need to get some rubber this week to go on the bottom support and in the cups to provide some shock absorbing for it





Originally I was planning to come off the shock hoops for the top mount, but after looking at it further, that doesn't seem like the best option. Again, because of the in-line six the radiator is quite a ways forward of the shock hoops. It is actually very close to the grill, so I was thinking about just coming off the grill with a couple brackets to press down on the 1x2 box tubing that will sit in the top channel of the radiator.

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If that didn't provide enough clamping force, I could always use some threaded rods between the top and bottom mounts to clamp the radiator between them and then the bracket going to the grill doesn't have to do anything other than keep the top of the radiator from moving forward or backward.

Hope to get the radiator finished up this week, so I can move on to the rest of the items on the checklist.
 

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Discussion Starter #46
Thanks! Going to get them mounted back up and start working on some aluminum inner fenders as soon as the radiator mount is done.

They are the sticky comp version, I have a set of 37 Toyo Open Country tires on another set of Walker Evans as my "street" treads :)

I haven't even wheeled the Treps yet, I bought then from a buddy almost a year ago right after I started this build.

Fenders are looking good. Are those Treps the comp compound or bias street version?
 

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Really enjoying your build. I'm a 1911 fan and remember your dad's ads for his shop way back when. You have some machining skills for sure. I just finished a similar project, in scale anyway... a rear stretch and two axle swap on my 97 TJ. Everything took me four times as long and cost 6 times as much as I planned.
 

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Discussion Starter #48
Thanks! It is definitely taking way longer than planned, and costing more :)

My dad was the true machinist and craftsman, I'm just a hack compared to him. Fortunately, he left me a really nice shop with a lot of nice, high quality, albeit now old/classic, tools to work with.

I wish he was still around to talk to, as I constantly run into things where I could really use his guidance on how to make a specific tool or machine a certain part. I know he is watching over me and hopefully likes what I'm doing, although I know that his level of accuracy & precision are at a whole different level than what I'm working on.

Really enjoying your build. I'm a 1911 fan and remember your dad's ads for his shop way back when. You have some machining skills for sure. I just finished a similar project, in scale anyway... a rear stretch and two axle swap on my 97 TJ. Everything took me four times as long and cost 6 times as much as I planned.
 

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Might be too late on this, but on your front fenders if you're worried about the singles bolt holding them on. Why not make an interlocking bung and use the single bolt in tension. Basically continue the bug on your grill hoop all the way into the fender and put a slug in the fender tube that accepts the bung. So you now effectively have a piece of what looks to be 1" in sheer rather than a 3/8ths? bolt
 

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Discussion Starter #50
Might be too late on this, but on your front fenders if you're worried about the singles bolt holding them on. Why not make an interlocking bung and use the single bolt in tension. Basically continue the bug on your grill hoop all the way into the fender and put a slug in the fender tube that accepts the bung. So you now effectively have a piece of what looks to be 1" in sheer rather than a 3/8ths? bolt
Yeah - it's a little late, but I appreciate the idea. I kicked around a number of different ideas on how to do the front, including the bung idea or even something like an interlocking internal tube clamp.

The bung idea was the first one, but the reason I didn't go that way was that you would end up with a weld filet where the bung on the hoop was welded. The weld filet wouldn't have a smooth transition with the end of the fender tube slid onto the bung and butted up to the hoop. I thought about turning a step in a piece of solid 1.5" bar so that you would weld essentially a 1" diameter bung at the hoop side and 1.5" diameter a little further out. The 1.75" tubing of the fender would slip over and cover the whole weld filet, mating cleanly with the hoop, and then use a couple set screws on the backside to hold it in place. This just seemed a little complicated.

I thought about a tube clamp, but there's really no room, since the fender tube starts curving immediately and you don't have enough of a straight section to install an internal clamp. I actually had a little bit of difficulty just getting the 1/2" wide insert into the tube and far enough back where it wouldn't interfere with the mate up of the hoop and the fender due to the angle it intersects the hoop at.

So I ended up with the bolt through the hoop into the threaded plug in the fender and then reinforced that with the two 5/16" cap screws underneath. There's really no where for the tube to go with this joint. If it lays over on that side, it's pressing against the hoop. If there's an upward or downward force on the fender tube then you have essentially three 5/16" bolts loaded in shear, which should be pretty strong. Also, it's just a fender, so if it bends/breaks it's not a life critical issue.
 

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Discussion Starter #52
Thanks! Yours is looking good as well! Hopefully one day I will be able to bring it out to CA and be able to do some go fast stuff like I am building it for. I had hoped to have this done for Easter Jeep Safari, but that's not going to happen :(

Still heading out there with 5 rigs from FL, but I'll have to ride bitch :(
 

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Discussion Starter #54
Looking great! Too bad you won't make EJS, but better not to rush it.

Be sure to come visit our booth!
Will definitely stop by, it will be great to meet you in person! We are actually arriving Thursday the 13th and staying through the 19th. The guys I'm going with are more interested in hard core wheeling than the EJS rides, so this way we get to have some of the EJS experience but are able to wheel the second part of the visit without the crowds.
 

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Discussion Starter #55
Got the radiator mount finished up this week. The bottom of the radiator has 1/4" x 2" medium density closed cell silicone rubber foam, and then the cups that the bottom of the tank sits in is lined with a mix of 1/4" and 1/8" silicone foam.



The top mount is insulated from the radiator with 1/8" foam. The bottom mount holds the radiator very securely, so the top mount just keeps the radiator from tipping forward and backward and just applies a little downward pressure to keep it seated in the bottom mount. To get a little downward pressure to the top mount I fabricated the tabs and bolted them to the grill with a ~ 1/16" thick washer under the tab and then tacked them to the top mount. After the tabs were completely welded they were then bolted to the grill without the washer underneath so there was ~ 1/16" preload to help make sure the radiator is secure.





 

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Discussion Starter #57
It's been slow going again :(

Bolted one of the fenders back on to see how it looked after paint and putting the edge guard on the cut hood. It fit okay, there are a few small gaps, but those are obviously there for increased cooling :) The edge guard actually makes it look a little worse than it is, the cuts are actually fairly smooth.

[/URL

[URL=http://s1150.photobucket.com/user/giles45shop/media/20170325_163155_zpsnpjhzt9x.jpg.html]


The other thing that was accomplished was finding the right radiator hose. The new radiator is quite a bit wider that the factory one, so the factory hose wasn't going to work anymore.


I dreaded the trip to the parts store - "I need a radiator hose like this but it needs to be 2 inches wider" - and waiting for the guy to ask me what was the year, make & model. Fortunately, the young guy didn't really ask many questions and led me back to the assortment of hoses hanging on the wall. I explained what I was looking for and showed him the picture and he actually picked out something that looked like it would work in about 30 seconds and was only $10.99 for a US made hose.

Took it home and test fit and it worked perfectly:


He was unable to do a reverse look-up on the part number, but when I got home a little digging revealed that the Dayco 70115 fits ~ 600 vehicles, including various V6 Isuzu Troopers and all the 70's-80's Dodge pick-ups with the 225 Slant 6, so it should be easy to find if I ever need a replacement.

The lower radiator hose looks like it might fit if I rotate it a little, but didn't have time to investigate that one yet.

The other thing that I have to figure out is where to put the thermostatic switch for the electric fan. It came with a brass screw in bung. I was looking at the existing one in the thermostat hosing and wondering about just getting a brass tee and a nipple (looks like 1/2" NPT) and simply putting a tee right there with both sending units right there. Despite what it looks like in the picture, there's plenty of room, and the only downside I can see is if the tee somehow traps an air bubble which messes up the temperature reading of either of the probes.

Also thought about cutting the radiator hose and adding in a short piece of 1.5" metal tubing with a bung welded in, but seems like that adds a couple extra failure points. Any ideas or suggestions appreciated on how to install the second sending unit would be greatly appreciated.

 

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Discussion Starter #58
So it's been quite a while since I've updated this post, and unfortunately the reason is that there just has been a lot happening on the build :( Just seems like there hasn't been much free time, but hopefully that is changing and I can get back to working on this project. I did take a couple weeks off and a group of us hauled our rigs from Florida to Moab to do some wheeling around Easter Jeep Safari. It was a great time, we got to spend some time at the vendor expo and I was able to meet Ryan from Accutune in person after spending lots of time talking on the phone. We didn't wheel with any of the official groups as we wanted to stay to ourselves and avoid the issues with wheeling in huge groups. We got to enjoy Kane's Creek, Hell's Revenge, Pritchett Canyon, Gold Spike and my favorite, which was the Helldorado trail at BFE.

The only drawback to the trip is how far it is. It was three days out and back, ~ 4300 miles. It was cool seeing that part of the country, other than flying over it. And we did get to see some interesting sites like the Big Texan in Amarillo and a great lunch at Twin Peaks in Albq .









After getting back I did get a few things accomplished. After searching the auto parts store I couldn't find a preformed lower radiator hose that fit, so ended up with a universal style that seems to fit well. While I was in Moab, I saw a neat idea for the lower limit strap mount on Jessi Comb's car and decided it would work well for mine.

Bought a piece of 2.75" x 0.25 wall DOM and turned the outside down and bored the inside for ~ 0.004" slip fit on my 2.25" links with ~ 0.2" wall thickness and slit lengthwise. Made some tabs out of 3/8" plate and then welded them to the collars with a 1/4" spacer between them so that the slit would close on the collar and still leave clearance between the tabs for the limit strap tab.





 

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Discussion Starter #59
The upper clevis mounts and straps were from Kartek. The clevis mount is made for up to three straps, so I went ahead and machined off the excess material from the mount and shortened up the bolt since I was only using one strap. Also substituted a nylock nut on the top locking nut.





I also managed to got the reservoirs mounted. I wasn't thrilled about mounting them on the cross bar near the heat of the engine, but there just didn't seem to be anywhere else that they would fit. I was hoping to mount them on the front or rear part of the shock hoop, but the length of hose, stiffness and size of the reservoirs just weren't going to allow this to happen. I've seen lots of them mounted in the same position on the cross bar, so figured I would give it a try. The cross bar is actually really close to touching the bottom of the hood, so the reservoirs had to be mounted lower than that to make sure everything cleared.

I was struggling to hold the reservoir in place and tack everything by myself, but found that a piece of 2" schedule 40 PVC is almost the same size as the reservoir and made it much easier to hold things in place and get it all level when working by myself. Everything is pretty tight, so the extra length on these reservoir mounts actually helped to clear the PCV fitting on the top of the valve cover and the heater hose.







The other thing that got accomplished was that I ordered the rest of my hydro-assist from Josh at AGR/Steerco. Pump, pulley, ram, mounting brackets and a new reservoir that he is coming out with. Should be here in a couple weeks. Looking forward to incorporating this into the build. Besides the steering, still need to work out the details on the front sway bar and the winch plate mounting. I've got a couple ideas for both, now just need to spend some time mocking things up to see if my ideas are actually going to work :)
 

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It's been slow going again :(

Bolted one of the fenders back on to see how it looked after paint and putting the edge guard on the cut hood. It fit okay, there are a few small gaps, but those are obviously there for increased cooling :) The edge guard actually makes it look a little worse than it is, the cuts are actually fairly smooth.

[/URL

[URL=http://s1150.photobucket.com/user/giles45shop/media/20170325_163155_zpsnpjhzt9x.jpg.html]


The other thing that was accomplished was finding the right radiator hose. The new radiator is quite a bit wider that the factory one, so the factory hose wasn't going to work anymore.


I dreaded the trip to the parts store - "I need a radiator hose like this but it needs to be 2 inches wider" - and waiting for the guy to ask me what was the year, make & model. Fortunately, the young guy didn't really ask many questions and led me back to the assortment of hoses hanging on the wall. I explained what I was looking for and showed him the picture and he actually picked out something that looked like it would work in about 30 seconds and was only $10.99 for a US made hose.

Took it home and test fit and it worked perfectly:


He was unable to do a reverse look-up on the part number, but when I got home a little digging revealed that the Dayco 70115 fits ~ 600 vehicles, including various V6 Isuzu Troopers and all the 70's-80's Dodge pick-ups with the 225 Slant 6, so it should be easy to find if I ever need a replacement.

The lower radiator hose looks like it might fit if I rotate it a little, but didn't have time to investigate that one yet.

The other thing that I have to figure out is where to put the thermostatic switch for the electric fan. It came with a brass screw in bung. I was looking at the existing one in the thermostat hosing and wondering about just getting a brass tee and a nipple (looks like 1/2" NPT) and simply putting a tee right there with both sending units right there. Despite what it looks like in the picture, there's plenty of room, and the only downside I can see is if the tee somehow traps an air bubble which messes up the temperature reading of either of the probes.

Also thought about cutting the radiator hose and adding in a short piece of 1.5" metal tubing with a bung welded in, but seems like that adds a couple extra failure points. Any ideas or suggestions appreciated on how to install the second sending unit would be greatly appreciated.

Just saw this. Not sure if you already came up with something, but I drilled another hole in the thermostat housing for my temp switch. See below.



One of my friends tried the tee route, and he saw a difference in temp that was close to 10 or 15 degrees which I feel was caused by air bubbles in the tee throwing off readings.
 
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