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Discussion Starter #1
A single triangulated 4 link packages much better in the back of my current project. I know that rear steer is inherent to not double triangulating a 4 link. My uppers will be fully triangulated ontop of the diff and the lowers will be tilted inwards, probably around 10*.

In the calculator Im getting 4-5* roll. Everything else is looking good.

The question simply is , how bad is 4* ?

The truck will be an expedition rig and go through medium difficulty trails on 33s and maybe 35s some day.

Ill post calculator screens when I get home.
 

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It sounds like some street driving is in the plans 4 deg is still on the high side, I would keep playing with it.
 

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Why can't you fully triangulate it? The uppers are harder to package than the lowers, if you've got that figured out there's no reason I can think of not to go double triangulated.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Why can't you fully triangulate it? The uppers are harder to package than the lowers, if you've got that figured out there's no reason I can think of not to go double triangulated.
I have a square tube fresh frame built for it right now. With the way its currently setup a single triangulated 4 would work with the stock lower axle mounts and changing the upper link to triangulated links on an existing crossmember.

I honestly have no super solid reason why not to its just packaging is easier, one less crossmember too. My main reason for asking is because if I cant get it into an acceptable range with single triangulation I will. If not I will go double triangulated.


It sounds like some street driving is in the plans 4 deg is still on the high side, I would keep playing with it.
Theres a lot of street driving in store so Ill keep tweeking. Is there anything else I can alter to reduce the roll other than link angle?
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Longer lower links will often reduce it some, but the best way is to simply triangulate the lowers. You can inboard them a few inches and not have to run another cross member. Just build something like this.

http://www.ruffstuffspecialties.com/catalog/OUTRIG-45.html
Yeah I was playing with the calculator last night and was able to get my roll down to 0 by doing exactly like what you posted there. It winds up being a double triangulated setup just the lowers arent kicked in a huge amount.

Definitely enough to keep the axle put though.


Just as a noob question here and Im pretty sure I already know the answer but your lowers should never be above you axle center line correct? Too much stress?
 

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Yeah I was playing with the calculator last night and was able to get my roll down to 0 by doing exactly like what you posted there. It winds up being a double triangulated setup just the lowers arent kicked in a huge amount.

Definitely enough to keep the axle put though.


Just as a noob question here and Im pretty sure I already know the answer but your lowers should never be above you axle center line correct? Too much stress?
It will still work with the lowers above the axle centerline, but you better have some stout upper links,mounts,truss. Otherwise you'll rip em off when climbing.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
It will still work with the lowers above the axle centerline, but you better have some stout upper links,mounts,truss. Otherwise you'll rip em off when climbing.
Ok. Im gonna keep them at axle center line and drop my frame side mount to get my numbers in check then. I dont want to be over stressing shit.
 
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