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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Got a waggy 44 (89) on the YJ.

I've got the stock drum brakes in the rear. When we first swapped the axle, the drum brakes were almost completely rebuilt. New drums, new pistons, rebuild kit (springs & such), new pads, and just about a year ago....new brake adjuster set-up.

The first set of pads had the original adjusters in it - the pads wore out quickly at the top. I bought a new adjuster kit and new pads. When installing the new pads, the adjusters were all the way IN in order to get the drums on. E-brake nice & tight.

After several months and several wheeling trips (ebrake is loose) - open up the brakes to notice the pads are wearing at the top again. Manually adjust the (brakes) and put the everything back together. E-brake is tight again.

Several months go by - inspection is looming. E-brake is loose again - open up the brakes and even more wear at the tops of the pads. This time - I get totally new pads so I'll atleast get through inspection.

I don't wanna hear any BEEF about a disk brake conversion. I aint' about to throw disks in without majorly overhauling the ms and booster. I ain't got that kinda cash laying around yet. Besides...I'd rather have an Atlas!

Anyone with a rear waggy 44 have this problem?? I know drum brakes suck in general.... but is there something I'm missing???

I don't do a lot of mud, just your typical water puddles and stuff on the trails. Seems after every offroad trip where I'm stretching the suspension - the e-brake gets loose. I already have an extended drivers-side e-brake cable.
 

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Something that is overlooked - and may or may not be the source of your problem - are the condition of the wear pads on the backing plates. You know, the six flat spots that you are suppose to grease/lubricate to allow the shoes to move freely against the backing plate. On a severly used set of backing plates, the pads for the bottom portion of the shoes (shoes ends closest to the adjuster) develop a deep groove. If you don't take a grinder sanding disc to the wear pads to remove any grooves, the new shoes will sit in that groove and may not allow the adjuster to do it's job of pushing the shoes out when required.
 

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Janster said:
I don't wanna hear any BEEF about a disk brake conversion. I aint' about to throw disks in without majorly overhauling the ms and booster. I ain't got that kinda cash laying around yet. Besides...I'd rather have an Atlas!
Just go with disk. I run waggy 44s f&r w/ 4wheel disk on a stock MC and booster. I can lock my 36s up on command.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Scrambler Jimmy said:
Something that is overlooked - and may or may not be the source of your problem - are the condition of the wear pads on the backing plates. You know, the six flat spots that you are suppose to grease/lubricate to allow the shoes to move freely against the backing plate. On a severly used set of backing plates, the pads for the bottom portion of the shoes (shoes ends closest to the adjuster) develop a deep groove. If you don't take a grinder sanding disc to the wear pads to remove any grooves, the new shoes will sit in that groove and may not allow the adjuster to do it's job of pushing the shoes out when required.
Thanks!!
In my travels in researching...I did read something about those. Never knew about that...but it certainly makes sense.
I haven't been able to get out there to look at them closely yet. I just put new pads on so it'll pass inspection tomorrow.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
B.A.R.K said:
Just go with disk. I run waggy 44s f&r w/ 4wheel disk on a stock MC and booster. I can lock my 36s up on command.
Wow...
I honestly couldn't go with disks without upgrading the mc & booster along with it. Call me anal.....

I notice the weakness on the trails with my set-up currently....certain situations where the pucker factor relies heavily on your braking system. Having your foot almost to the floor isn't exactly what I consider *strong brakes*
 
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