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I am tearing down my 22r to rebuild. I am planning on using a flex hone for the cylinders. I do not know what grit I should use. I am planing on using regular rings. Some of the choices being 120, 180, 240, and 400. The last being for moly rings, which I am not using. Any help would be appreciated.:D
 

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If this is your first time, then use small pieces of 32 grit sandpaper and rub vigorously. If you find a ridge (one part of cylinder larger than the other, use a tape measure for this), then a die grinder (with a carbide burr) will come in handy. As far as the cylinder hone, use the stone type and set it for high-speed, but work it real slow.
 

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I am tearing down my 22r to rebuild. I am planning on using a flex hone for the cylinders. I do not know what grit I should use. I am planing on using regular rings. Some of the choices being 120, 180, 240, and 400. The last being for moly rings, which I am not using. Any help would be appreciated.:D
>>>*I prefer the moly ring facing, it will withstand a lot more heat without galling. But the modern iron rings are also very good.

The best grit for a home job is 280, be sure the bores are in very good shape first because a flex hone will only create a sealing pattern, they have little effect on imperfections.

Adjust the timing of your strokes to create a close to 30° crisscross pattern.

One trick I use is to take the bare block outside and grab a garden hose with a fan spray. Get her wet, let the hone build up a slurry, then use the hose to flush her out. The slurry creates the fine smooth pattern you want for a good seal.

Then some hot soapy water, get the surface clean enough to eat breakfast off of. I get down inside with a toothbrush, right into every nook and cranny.

*Use someone else's toothbrush, because after that they taste funny....*LOL**...Lightly oil and bolt her together. I built a lot of engines this way before I could afford a hone stand.......*EB
 

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>>>*I prefer the moly ring facing, it will withstand a lot more heat without galling. But the modern iron rings are also very good.

The best grit for a home job is 280, be sure the bores are in very good shape first because a flex hone will only create a sealing pattern, they have little effect on imperfections.

Adjust the timing of your strokes to create a close to 30° crisscross pattern.

One trick I use is to take the bare block outside and grab a garden hose with a fan spray. Get her wet, let the hone build up a slurry, then use the hose to flush her out. The slurry creates the fine smooth pattern you want for a good seal.

Then some hot soapy water, get the surface clean enough to eat breakfast off of. I get down inside with a toothbrush, right into every nook and cranny.

*Use someone else's toothbrush, because after that they taste funny....*LOL**...Lightly oil and bolt her together. I built a lot of engines this way before I could afford a hone stand.......*EB
EB,

If the cylinders are just honed, what are the chances of sealing problems? When do you recommend line boring the cylinders on a block up rebuild?
gNARLS
 

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EB,

If the cylinders are just honed, what are the chances of sealing problems? When do you recommend line boring the cylinders on a block up rebuild?
gNARLS
>>>*Well, inspection and measurements answer the questions. It is common for a cylinder bore to "look good" but be out of round from years of load on the thrust side of the piston. A glance or feel of an average ring ridge at the top tells the story, they are seldom uniform.

The feel test is a good one, if you can catch your fingernail easily on it, bore the thing. Heck, what does a 4 cylinder bore/hone job cost, maybe $60/80 depending on area? Perhaps a bit more with tank and mag and deck, also important.

The original rings conform to the imperfection as they wear, the new ones simply cannot quickly and we see oil burning for thousands of miles sometimes, depending on condition and prep of course.

I like perfectly round and perfectly straight but I have been accused of being fussy. I have also flex honed literally hundreds of blocks back in the early days with success so I can't say it is wrong to do it. But then I also no longer even own a flex hone, I have a big Rottler airfloat machine. My grandaughter can handle that and get a fine job out and she is 10.

(In fact, I already taught her how, since even though I TOLD my son Tod to have some sons all he popped up with was girls..*LOL**..)

*So when I am long gone and you see someone posting as *SHEB...heehee...You will know who it is..

In fact, if the measurements pass, it is perfectly acceptable for a nice hone rebuild....*EB
 

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In my opinion, if you dont bore the block for the next size bigger pistons, you are just wasting your time and money. Dont do a half assed engine build if you want it to last. I have never seen a stock 22r that was straight enough to get away just a hone job.
 

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x2 on using 240 (closet choice to 280 grit).

If this engine has a lot of miles on it, I would recommend using a dingle berry over the 3-stone flex hone. If there is uneven wear from top-to-bottom, the flat edged flex hone will only hone the high spots where less cylinder wear occurred. A dingle berry on the other hand will better contour to a highly worn cylinder. (The flat edged flex hone will reduce the difference in cylinder wear, however it may leave areas unhoned.)

If you find a ridge........then a die grinder (with a carbide burr) will come in handy.
I recommend against using a die grinder to a cylinder bore. I suggest that is it impossible to control a die grinder in this situation, and you may end up destroying the cylinder.

set it for high-speed
Sorry to be picking on Kevin, but I feel it is better to spin the stone at a slower speed. If the stone is spinning rapidly, then your motions will have to be equally as rapid to maintain the criss cross pattern, and it might be hard to do this if you are moving too fast.

My two cents.

BigMike
 

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In my opinion, if you dont bore the block for the next size bigger pistons, you are just wasting your time and money.
You should at least check the bore.. Have it done professionally as the bore doesn't always wear evenly.

If it's worn, you're taking a $100 short cut for on something that'll probably cut 100k or more off the life of that motor...

Engines should be bored (or at least final honed) AFTER you have pistons in hand. Pistons may vary slightly in size.
 

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Man now you guys got me interested!

I have a 22re sitting outside that I was planning on doing a low budget rebuild on. I was going to take it to my friends shop and clean up the block and measure it up to see how it looks. I got the short block out of a 92 2wd truck for $50. The cylinders feel good, with no ridge so I might try and get away with a hone job only and then get the Engnbldr.com master rebuild kit and a new head, cam, oil pump and timing cover. I'll Mic and hopefully just polish the crank and check the rods to see if I need to get them reconditioned. My question is is just honing it going to make it more likely to have the dreaded 22r/re piston slap sound? I got this 92 22re motor because all the ones I have ever heard had no knock sound at all. I will gladly bore it .020 over if it will gurantee there will be no knock. What is the optimal piston clearance range to look for? How did Toyota get rid of that diesel sound that most all the early 22r and RE's seem to have?
 
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