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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I am in the process of changing the timing chain on the motor in my 1988 4runner. I want to be sure that the timing marks are in the right place. I have looked at the factory service manual for an 1985 toyota 22re and I am not sure if the old chain that I have on my motor has jumped a tooth or two on the sprocket? The motor idled rough and was gutless until about 3000 rpms and had no power on hills. I have the timing chain cover off and have the cam shaft sprocket lined up with the mark on the rocker arm at 12 o'clock, but the key way on the crank shaft is pointed at about 1-2 o'clock. The FSM says the key shaft should be on top? So should it be 12 o'clock? I have alot of slop in the chain on the drivers side of the chain and the chain guide was broken on that side.
 

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timing chain

The cam sprocket mark will be just to the left of TDC and the crank mark straight up at TDC.
HTH
Jeff S.
 

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I am in the process of changing the timing chain on the motor in my 1988 4runner. I want to be sure that the timing marks are in the right place. I have looked at the factory service manual for an 1985 toyota 22re and I am not sure if the old chain that I have on my motor has jumped a tooth or two on the sprocket? The motor idled rough and was gutless until about 3000 rpms and had no power on hills. I have the timing chain cover off and have the cam shaft sprocket lined up with the mark on the rocker arm at 12 o'clock, but the key way on the crank shaft is pointed at about 1-2 o'clock. The FSM says the key shaft should be on top? So should it be 12 o'clock? I have alot of slop in the chain on the drivers side of the chain and the chain guide was broken on that side.
On an 88 the lower pulley is 2 piece, and are known to "move" from thier original intended location, so using the lower pulley to locate TDC isn't an accurate method. Cam pins come in 2 different locations, so that method is out also. You need to use the #1 piston to accurately determine when the engine is at true TDC. Pull the plugs, all of them, and use a long thin screwdriver to check the rise of the #1 piston as you slowly rotate the engine, locating the pistons movement to the very top, or TDC. The "dot' on the upper gear if correct will locate at about 11:58, or slightly to the left of 12:00. Once you've done this, look at the lower pulley to determine it's correctness in its relation to TDC, remark the pulley if needed. Go to 4x4wire.com, in the toyota section there is a download for the timing chain replacement process, it's a good read, and will cover all of the gotchas.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Thanks for the info Tim, it was very helpful. The job went smooth.
I think I'll have a go at replacing the clutch next.
 

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Providing it's #1 at TDC and not # 4 .......... Pull the # 1 plug and make sure the Piston is right up top ....
the cam decides which is on the compresison stroke and which is on teh exhaust stroke.
With the head off, or lining up the cam with a new chain or whatever, TDC #1 and TDC #4 are the same thing.
 
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