Pirate 4x4 banner

Which way to build the slab/retaining wall system....

1 - 15 of 15 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,528 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
Due to the provision I have said is a must to my next shop I need 9.5' walls to accomodate the 9x8 roll ups, 8' studs will be placed onto of a 18" retaining wall perimeter.

Winter is getting close here so just may have to go option 2....

Would you place the retaining wall on top of a poured slab, or would you pour the slab after the retaining walls have cured somewhat with guaranteeing the height being 18".

Why I say option 2 may have to be implemented, is sure gonna be hell gettin buds over to help put up walls if it gets cold.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
494 Posts
#2 works great and all you need to do is drill a couple of holes for the rebar to tie in. And when it cold all you do is trap and the pour the slab
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
9,708 Posts
#2 works great and all you need to do is drill a couple of holes for the rebar to tie in. And when it cold all you do is trap and the pour the slab
But you still have to dig a footer for the block wall. Why not tie the footer and slab into a monolith?

In my area, IIRC, the code allows a footer to be dug, cradles and rebar set in the trenches, then concrete is poured into the footers and slab. Then, a block wall can be created.

Sort of like this...
 

Attachments

·
Registered
Joined
·
428 Posts
The second is correct you must tie the wall into the footer. I assume that there would be an "earth load" against the wall, thus the need to have the footer.

The other thing that you need to be aware of is in most juristictions you will need a permit from the local building department, without it any damage which could possible occure in the future would not be covered by insurance.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
928 Posts
But you still have to dig a footer for the block wall. Why not tie the footer and slab into a monolith?

In my area, IIRC, the code allows a footer to be dug, cradles and rebar set in the trenches, then concrete is poured into the footers and slab. Then, a block wall can be created.

Sort of like this...
The second is correct you must tie the wall into the footer. I assume that there would be an "earth load" against the wall, thus the need to have the footer.

The other thing that you need to be aware of is in most juristictions you will need a permit from the local building department, without it any damage which could possible occure in the future would not be covered by insurance.
For certain and for sure X2
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,528 Posts
Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Good points, I sure hope this place sells fast so we can take possession of the new place faster which will allow me more time to figure things out.

Shouldnt be much of an earthload against the walls sinces its a pretty flat lot. Have to see where the property lines are and where I can put the garage to begin with, just doing preliminary research before the time crunch comes.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
5,248 Posts
What you are referring to is called a stem wall, not a retaining wall. Retaining walls are used to hold back dirt, stem walls elevate the height of the building off of slab level.

And yes, it should definitely be tied in with the footer and the slab poured up to it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
772 Posts
Shouldnt be much of an earthload against the walls sinces its a pretty flat lot.
Make sure you waterproof the portion of your wall that is buried or you will have water coming inside on your floor. Especially in the spring when the snow melts.

John.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,383 Posts
What you are referring to is called a stem wall, not a retaining wall. Retaining walls are used to hold back dirt, stem walls elevate the height of the building off of slab level.

And yes, it should definitely be tied in with the footer and the slab poured up to it.
Actually, I would call what he's describing a "Knee Wall" as it is above finished floor. A stem wall is below FF.

I doubt it will make much difference structurally how you sequence it. Just make sure you dowel and/or key the two parts together.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
5,248 Posts
Actually, I would call what he's describing a "Knee Wall" as it is above finished floor. A stem wall is below FF.

I doubt it will make much difference structurally how you sequence it. Just make sure you dowel and/or key the two parts together.
Touche'
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,528 Posts
Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Pretty sure I am going against the results of the poll and doing the knee wall, yes it will be tied together with rebar, as well waterproofed. Styrafoam insulated on the outside as well.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
5,248 Posts
Pretty sure I am going against the results of the poll and doing the knee wall, yes it will be tied together with rebar, as well waterproofed. Styrafoam insulated on the outside as well.
Why? Everyone in this thread is giving you lots of good reasons to build the kneewall in one piece and pour the slab up to it, and you're just going to disregard them and do it the other way anyway? I'm not saying it won't work, but why'd you post the question in the first place if you don't want to listen to what people have to say? :confused:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
873 Posts
I would say pour the slab first then the pony/stem/knee wall make sure you keyway the joints and use either sika tube sealant in the keyway or swell stop to prevent water from coming in the cold joint between the pours
also if you pour the wall first you will have to run your rear dowels out of your formwork meaning you have to drill hole through your formwork on the inside for the slab and destroy the form work when you go to strip it
if you do the slab first no drilling required just put your edgeform up and tie your dowels to the edge form with a 1.5 inch doobie inbetween much much easier
Bye the way I'm a concrete foreman for one of s.f. bay area's biggest concrete outfit I know just a little bit about this stuff
 
G

·
I would say pour the slab first then the pony/stem/knee wall make sure you keyway the joints and use either sika tube sealant in the keyway or swell stop to prevent water from coming in the cold joint between the pours
also if you pour the wall first you will have to run your rear dowels out of your formwork meaning you have to drill hole through your formwork on the inside for the slab and destroy the form work when you go to strip it
if you do the slab first no drilling required just put your edgeform up and tie your dowels to the edge form with a 1.5 inch doobie inbetween much much easier
Bye the way I'm a concrete foreman for one of s.f. bay area's biggest concrete outfit I know just a little bit about this stuff
Holy crap, someone call the grammar police on this mental midget :eek:
 
1 - 15 of 15 Posts
Top