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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
School me on Mosin Nagants.

I've been getting an itch for a Mosin Nagant or two. Know nothing about them. What do I need to know? Are there multiple models? Chambered differently?

I would like one or two reasonably good condition ones, who has these in stock?
 

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The rifles were all 7.62x54R unless they were "sporterized" here in the states. I don't care for the trigger personally, and look for one that is easy to manipulate the bolt on. There are aftermarket triggers and stocks out there as well as kits to switch from straight bolt to bent bolt to mount a scope in a non-scout style configuration. A guy on one of the gun forums (I think the firing line) made a mag extension for them that bumps the round capacity from 5 to 10. I have a pic somewhere I'll post up for you.
 

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Oh and there are different models. Mostly the 91/30 and the M44 are what you will run into. The 91/30 IIRC has something like a 29" barrel, and the M44 is more compact with a barrel somewhere around the 22" neighborhood.
 

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there is a hex and round receiver
theyre all chambered in 7.62x54r
most important criteria is bore condition IMO
 

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The spelling is the same on both - Mosin Nagant :flipoff2:



That's because it's the same person. But if you go up to anyone that knows anything about C&R guns and ask for a Nagant, they're going to assume you're talking about the revolver.
 

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That's because it's the same person. But if you go up to anyone that knows anything about C&R guns and ask for a Nagant, they're going to assume you're talking about the revolver.
actually they are not. they are two different people. Captain Sergei Mosin (Russian), and Léon Nagant (Belgian). Each submitted separate rifles, each had issues. After collaborating they came up with the 91/30.
 

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actually they are not. they are two different people. Captain Sergei Mosin (Russian), and Léon Nagant (Belgian). Each submitted separate rifles, each had issues. After collaborating they came up with the 91/30.


I don't need a history lesson. The Nagant name in both the pistol and the rifle refers to the same person.
 

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It sounded like you were saying that Mosin and Nagant were the same person, such as first and last name. No problem.
 

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Here is my $100 mosin - was worried about recoil and whatnot, its nothing.

Shoot it and have fun-
[/URL]
 

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Look for M38s at a decent price, if there are none, get 91/30s.

You will also find m44s, but they have a bayonet permanently affixed to them and will be very heavy out to the muzzle end.

Get out there and start looking at them, worst thing that happens is someone that doesn't know how to clean for corrosives. Look at the muzzle, if it looks like you're looking into the butthole of satan then offer $50, nice barrel offer $120 cash out the door on a 91/30, and up to $200 on an m-38
 

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I've seen it said numerous times that a barrel with a counterbore will usually shoot better than one that needs it.
 

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I have a pair of 91/30's both from 1943 Izhevesk Armory. 1943 is the year that the most 91/30s were produced, and most of them at Izzy. Tula Armorys are slightly more rare, and you can tell the difference by the armory stamp on the receiver, Tula is a star, and Izhevesk is a small triangle with an arrow inside of it.

Most importnt thing when condsidering them is condition of bore as almost everything else is easily fixable.

Also look for a bolt that moves smoothly and easily as they are infamous for "Mosin Stickybolt", although this can usually be fixed with a good cleaning (scrub down with hoppes #9), and keep in mind that a 12 gauge bore brush or bore mop fits the receiver where the bolt goes, so you can clean it out pretty well too.

Each part, receiver, buttplate, magazine floorplate and bolt body are all stamped with a serial #. The bolt will also have an armory mark on it most of the time. If that is something that matter to you you can try to find one that has all matching numbers. Second best is numbers with lines stamped through them that dont macth and then matching numbers restamped, this shows it was done during an armory rearsenal.

I have one all original, all numbers matching which I love. The other is a mismatch of parts and is all ATI'd out with thier stock, bolt kit, bipod, and scope mount.

Both are fun rifles.

I could talk about Mosin's for days, so if you have any questions let me know.
 

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Here's the pic of the extended mag. I believe this guy was on The Firing Line, but not 100% sure on that.

anyway here it is.

magazine-mk2-lg2_zps4f0f41e5.jpg photo by missoula4x4 | Photobucket
Do you have any other info on this? I'm off to search.
Found it and downloaded the pic a few years ago. I know the guy had the two halves (split vertically) pressed and welded together. I think I was searching for Mosin detachable box mags when I came across that. Was looking for a DBM conversion hoping someone out there had developed a kit. At the time this was the only thing close. Not sure if that's changed though. I know the guy fed it with stripper clips. He didn't have the scope on it yet.
 
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