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Discussion Starter #1
Haven't seen much info on Air suspension and even less for shock valving...

Opinions or experience?

Desert or slow go?

Hypothetical situations welcome too.
 

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CrawlTunes
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3,808 Posts
I'm building a 4 linked truck for mud on air bags.

Here's what Motochris from FOA told em:
"I'd use the 2.5 remote reservoir shocks. Probably Med/Firm compression and Med rebound in front, Med compression and Med rebound in rear."

But that was advice specific to my application. I haven't purchased the shocks, or even finished the truck yet, so that's all the input I can offer.
 

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4,166 Posts
Its just like valving for any other suspension. Although I think bypass shocks help even more on air spring suspension because of the exponential spring rate.
 

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As the pressure increases in the bags, would the shocks not need to get stiffer to dampen? Looking into all this myself right now.
 

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I'm having good luck with standard shock valving... BUT! When the bags are at a lower pressure for street driving or lower height you need stiffer valving to compensate for the lack of support the bags provide. Soft shock will let my Jeep wallow, sway and undulate on woops and rougher roads.

I run 12" OEM F250 rear shocks for rear and standard 9012 in the front.
 

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Rock Stacker
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The bag size has alot to do with it. How much volume your compressing while cycling. Valve for a normal ride height and expect for the rebound to be firm when aired down and soft when air up. The compression would be soft when aired down and firm when aired up. Based on that low ride height would be good for unloading during crawling and high would be good for kick out during speed.
 

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The spring rate doesn't change with the air pressure. The spring rate changes with the air VOLUME. Same reason the rate of an air shock increases when you add more oil (decrease the air volume)

Big bags have high spring rates. Compressed bags have higher spring rates than extended ones, so the spring rate also changes with ride height, and both of those examples are are just other ways of describing how the rate increases as the bag is compressed and the volume gets smaller.

With an air bag, the pressure pretty much only tells you how much weight is on them. If you want them to ride higher, you add air, but the pressure doesn't change much.
 
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