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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
OK here goes, I am gonna be installing my plumbing after they form my slab up tomorrow. Need someone to shed some light on this for me. Here is what I got. Sink in kitchen, bathroom and shop along with shower and washing machine will be plumbed together for greywater and ran to the woods. Not a problem with local codes or anything with that. I was told I can tie all that in together and run them out with a 3" pipe (is that big enough) What about venting all that? What can be vented together and what needs to be seperate? Basically the tub, shitter, b-room sink, shop sink and washing machine are within a 10x10 area.....just on different sides of a wall. The kitchen sink is the only thing that will be of any distance away......20' approx.

Also need info on the tub drain. Where does the P-trap go for that? In the concrete or under the concrete in the dirt? How do you know where to put the drains? All tubs the same or what? Thanks in advance. Pictures are good too.
 

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The simplest thing to do is go to Home Depot or lowes and get one of the code check books for plumbing. It will give you all the basics on these.

Kind of hard to answer about the vents without seeing how you plan to run the pipes. Vent lines need to be within so many feet of the sink, tub, toilet etc. I can't remember the exact # of feet right now so I won't guess. If the main 3" vent comes up in the 10' x10' area of all the drains and is after all the drains you should be ok. Right now the vents shouldn't matter as long as you get the main stack out of the floor. Most of the vent piping will be done in the stud walls. The tub and toilet might need a separate vent thru the conc. but you may be able to use one single stack for the whole bathroom. If the distance to the main from the tub toilet is short say less than 4' you shouldn't need a separate vent for those.

Depending on the tub the drain may be in the floor. The trap will definately be in the dirt or concrete. I would box out an area in the concrete floor where the tub drain will go and work on this afterwards. Leave yourself plenty of room and besure to go back into the wall ath the head of the tub to catch the overflow pipe. You will need to be sure that the line to the tub is plenty deep so you have room for the trap and tub drain. Its easy to extend the lines down its not so easy to lower the drain line later. Just fill this area with concrete after the tub is in.


If you plan on running water lines in the slab in copper they will need to be protected. Concrete eats copper.

I would not just dump the sewage in to the woods. It will stink and critters will want to crawl up in your pipe to investigate the new home you made for them. I would just go into a cesspool. Dig a big hole say 8' wide and 8' deep and fill it with 1' of stone. Stack cinder blocks in a circle about 5' in dia, with about a 1/2" gap between the block. Each row gets smaller until you can cover the top with a 30" round lid. You can just buy a seepage ring premade for this. Fill around the outside of the block with clean stone and top with about 18" of dirt.

Remember that the drain line needs a minimum of 1/4" per foot of fall. Lets say the kitchen drain is the highest point. At 20' to the main you need 5" of fall minimum you start the run under the concrete so thats 9" down from the slab minimum for this. At the tub lets say you go down 18" to make sure that you have enough room for the tub drain trap and all. That's the lowest point. From here every 20' you need to drop another 5". If the woods are 100' from the house you need to be down 18" for the tub + 25" for the pitch, so you are almost 4' in the ground. The farther you go the deeper the pipe will need to be in relation to the slab. Does the ground slope down towards the woods or is it up hill? If the woods are up hill you need to be even deeper in the ground. Not 4' down from the dirt but 4' down from the slab. If you screw this up expect the sewage to show up in your tub.

Hope this makes sense. If not Pm me and Ill try and help out some more. A drawing of what you have planned with some rough dimensions would help.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Well it is not "sewage" just the greywater. You may be referring to this as sewer also. If so I will probably do something out there, not just run it out there for the dogs to go woller in!! LOL!! Yeah the tub, shitter and b-room sink are on one side of the wall within a 5' area. The washing machine, and shop sink are on the other side of the wall in the same area.

So you are saying I need to have all the drains come together and then the vent needs to come off of that? Not shower, shitter, vent, shop sink, b-room sink, w-machine.....or some order like that.
 

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Ground slopes towards the woods. So far you are making great sense. My dad has the copy of the plans. Here is the best I can do. Shop is 40x60, apt is the bay on the right at a measurement of 20x40 Shop is designed in 3 bays, house on bay 3 of 3). (All of this is looking at the front of the shop) The bathroom starts approx. 15' into the 40' wall on the left. With tub, then shitter, then sink. This is on the house side of that wall. The shop sink, and washing machine will be on the shop side back to back with the tub, shitter, and sink. The kitchen sink will be about the same place but on the right side of the of the 20x40. You confused yet??
 

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I'll Pm you my email address, send me yours and I'll try and do a quick sketch for you and email it to you.

Not quite sure what your definition of grey water is. If you $hit in the toilet as far as I'm concerned its sewage unless it's treated. If you have a holding tank/ septic tank then I can under stand it sort of. Around me they still consider the drainage from that raw sewage if it has a toilet attached. Sink, washers, tub, that they don't have as much of an issue with dumping.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Shitter to sewer, the rest to the woods......(greywater) PM'ing you.
 

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got it, thanks a bunch. So the vent needs to go before anything drains correct? I assume to use a sanitary T with a cap on one end and the 3" drain coming off the other end? Damn I wish I could draw on this screen!!
 

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It should go before the other stuff ( I think of it as after since I work from the sewer back), at least thats what I have always seen. Usually the stack runs veritcal thru the building and every thing drains to it. The farther you are from the main the more likely you are to need a seperate vent. Again don't quote me I don't have a book infront of me to check but I am 90% sure taht will work.

The cleanout won't do you any good in the ground. You'll need a jack hammer to get to it. You can put it in the vent above the floor so the vent goes straight thru and the cap goes in the Y. The kitchen line may need a cleanout as it exits the slab this way now that I think of it. It might not be a bad idea to transition to 2" at the cleanout for the run to the main from the kitchen. If a line is going to clog, it's most likely this one due to grease build up. You may also want to add a T ouside the building and put a cleanout plug on topof a riser pipe. You can get 2 way sanitary T's for this if you want.

Most of my sewer work is in basements tying in to new septic tanks so while I often pour concrete I seldom run the lines myself, the plumber does. I also do a few basement bathrooms but generally thats putting in a grinder pump in the floor and piping to the main.

If you want I'll PM you my number and we can talk if its easier.
 
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