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I used the power distribution center from a 2001 Silverado in the place of my fuse block. It puts all of my relays in one place with the fuses.



Here is the ziploc bag with all of the fuses and relays:

 

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I used the power distribution center from a 2001 Silverado in the place of my fuse block. It puts all of my relays in one place with the fuses.



Here is the ziploc bag with all of the fuses and relays:

Puting all of your relays in one place defeats the purpose of using a relay.
Also......A fuse box is what makes your rig stand apart in a crowd?:shaking:
 

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WOW:eek: What a DICK, Binder I bow to you GET HIM he has no clue, my guess it takes most of his brain to keep his lungs working.
Damn, you seemed like a nice guy when you used to post on binder bulletin. Don't you work on ground support equipment or own a company that does? I know you know what a relay does. Do you think that a power distribution center like the one I'm using defeats the purpose of having relays? It doesn't seem like "binder" knows what he is talking about.
 

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Damn, you seemed like a nice guy when you used to post on binder bulletin. Don't you work on ground support equipment or own a company that does? I know you know what a relay does. Do you think that a power distribution center like the one I'm using defeats the purpose of having relays? It doesn't seem like "binder" knows what he is talking about.
I'm not sure what all the damn fuss is about, but I would say something if you were to put all your circuits into ONE relay.

Not that I'm sayin...just sayin:flipoff2:
 

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I didnt mean to sound like a jerk. I posted up the picture and explanation because that is probably the only thing that makes my rig stand apart. I am finishing the brakes right now on my swapped in full-width d44 and ford 9" axles. Mechanically, I've got nothing on most of these guys. The power distribution center is, at least, unique.
 

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I will be sweet to ya on the BP because it's where no nothings go to learn and ask pointless questions.Now for schooling, on aircraft relays are used to help shorted wire runs and keep things lighter, on ground equipment you find relays close to power demand so you do not have big wire and high amp draws running all over the place. The fan circuit for example you would not want to have a high amp, 10 gage wire drawing say 40 amps going to your instrument panel then to the fan, much easier and simpler to have the relay close to the fan so that the power draw is not going all over the Scout. Another poor example is the amp gage on a stock scout, how many Scouts you seen burned up or damaged by a short from to many amps going to far in a wire run. And by the way take a some time and look at Binders rig and the work he has done on it, it's one of the few I would think about swapping my SSII for.
 

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I like the idea of a central fuse block and relay center, but not sure where under the hood it would fit at this point. I only have a few relays, 2 for the headlights and 2 for the engine cooling fan, 2 for the fuel injection and 1 for the ARB pump. I went old school and ran everything off a terminal block that has fuse-able links connected to fuses to power everything the stock fuse panel does not cover. My problem is I like to make a home run for each new item I add :shaking:

FYI most of those OEM electrical centers is they are not water tight. I use the relays that have the rubber ring to keep them dry. It's a standard relay, but the holders are water tight. Look for a water tight dist. box where you can see the rubber ring under the cover.


Here is where I mounted my headlight relays so, I know this makes me stand out in a crowd:flipoff2: When maybe at night:smokin:
 

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My problem is I like to make a home run for each new item I add :shaking:
Which is what has to be done for people who have their relays on their fuse panel......If it's a wheeler and I hope that's what we're all talking about her on this board, it should have a basic/ stripped down electrical system. IMHO the relays should be physically in line with the device you're trying to power. Power source-relay-device with a fuse of course.
This alows the higher amp circuit to be as short as possible with less wiring to trace when it all goes to shit on the trail.........
Fuse "boxes" are for housewives who have to look in the owners manual when the cig lighter won't charge their cell phone any more.:flipoff2:
 

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Power source-relay-device with a fuse of course.
Thats it! I'm too cheap to waste money on longer runs of heavy ga. wire.
LOL.

Can't get much closer to the headlights than that. Can't tell in the pic, but the same main feed runs both headlight relays. One advantage to running a new fused homerun to each new item added, is only that one thing is out if the fuse blows. Don't have a current pic of what attached the main terminal block. But there's a homerun wire for the CB radio / dash gauges, engine fan, tranny cooler fan, ARB air pump, rock lights, headlights, two for the FI system. Since the terminal block is the central electrical dist point in my Scout, the bulk head connector goes there as does the Alternator charge wire. The battery wire is connected there along with the Ford starter solenoid to give the starter full juice. I moved all the wires off the starter and bypassed the amp meter. I know this does not apply to most rigs, except Scout II's.
Need to start an electrical thread vs filling this one up with it.
 

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I will be sweet to ya on the BP because it's where no nothings go to learn and ask pointless questions.Now for schooling, on aircraft relays are used to help shorted wire runs and keep things lighter, on ground equipment you find relays close to power demand so you do not have big wire and high amp draws running all over the place. The fan circuit for example you would not want to have a high amp, 10 gage wire drawing say 40 amps going to your instrument panel then to the fan, much easier and simpler to have the relay close to the fan so that the power draw is not going all over the Scout. Another poor example is the amp gage on a stock scout, how many Scouts you seen burned up or damaged by a short from to many amps going to far in a wire run. And by the way take a some time and look at Binders rig and the work he has done on it, it's one of the few I would think about swapping my SSII for.
I think we both know a good bit about equipment wiring. I taught the AGE course at Sheppard AFB for 3 years and worked on AGE for 4 years out in "the field" as well. I like that fuse/relay block because it looked like a challenge and it was an economically efficient way to supply power through many relays. I think it will help preserve some of my "antique" switches in my dash and keep my lights bright, etc. I have no doubt that Binder has his shit together. I just disagree that having many fuses mounted in close proximity to many relays "defeats the purpose of having relays."
I plan to create a brief "build thread" when I'm done or almost done. It's just taking a little longer than I would like.
 
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