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From the above link. Thanks Roger!

Rebuild:
Then you may feel inclined to clean and paint the hub/axle/etc. while you've got it this far disassembled. I used a combination of rotary and orbital sanders to remove the pitting from the steering knuckle ball. It took some time to get it smooth but I think it will help the seals both seal better and last longer. Also be sure to remove the old inner axle seal and replace it while the knuckle is open.

Here's a really cheap trick, that can be done anytime, but is easy while you have the axle torn down. Pull those square plugs on the knuckle housing (you know the ones you try to pump grease into, not gear oil, right) and drill and tap a hole for a grease fitting. I installed a 45°angled grease Zerk in each plug and now its easy to shoot a little extra grease into the knuckle if needed. With the crossover steering arms in the way, access to those plugs is limited, but its easy to pop a grease gun on the Zerk.

If the knuckle bearings were removed, reinstall them now, tapping the new race into the cleaned seat on the knuckle.
I used a rubber mallet to tap thep into place, chilling the races in a freezer for a few hours can held with the installation.
Make sure to bottom the race out in the seat, you can check this by looking at the little notches where you drove the old race out, there should be no gap visible.
When reinstalling the steering arms and lower knuckle bearing retainers, be sure to install the appropriate shims.
I think mine were bone stock when I took them apart and there were no shims.
The rebuild kit came with a huge stack of shims. I at first put the knuckle back together w/o shims and found it was overly tight.
After asking around, the consensus seems to say 0.40mm (or 0.040" I don't know what units are used ) of shims is the right amount.
The factory manual describes a bearing drag measurement technique if you prefer:
Use a fish scale to pull on the steering arm until the break-free pull is 7-13 lbs.
Do this without the knuckle wiper seals installed, just the knuckle bearings.
Be sure to pack the knuckle bearings before installing them.


Once the knuckle bearings are installed, insert the inner axle and birfield into the axle housing. Be careful to support the inner axle (especially on the long side) as you slip it in past the inner seal. At the very end, you need to do two tricky movements at once, that is getting the end of the inner axle into the splines on the differential carrier and at the same time getting the flats of the birfield joint past the knuckle bearings. It helps if someone can turn the pinion flange back and forth while you work the birfield into position. I like to start with the short side first, since its a lot easier. Once installed, put on the spindle, brake backing plate and seal and the retaining bolts (or stud kit).

Knuckle bearing cap nuts are torques to 71 ft.lbs.
Spindle bolts (or nuts on studs) are torqued to 38 ft.lbs.
There seem to be two schools of thought pn how much grease to use, one is to pack the knuckle full of grease and the other is to just put in "enough". I like the latter, the birfield itself gets packed full (that's where all the action is anyway) and then put some around the knuckle to keep the knuckle bearings lubricated. I like to leave some air space to allow for expansion when the axle heats up and prevent the excess grease from being forced out past the felts.

Then proceed to assembling the wheel bearings:

Drive in the new race(s) in the same manner as removing the old race.
Pack new inner bearing, put in inner bearing
Drive in new seal
Pack outer bearing
Either put outer bearing into it's race and slip whole unit onto spindle or slip unit on spindle then put outer bearing in. Be careful not to dump new/clean outer bearing on ground when putting it on spindle.
Put washer with tab on it for the slot in spindle on.
Put inner spindle nut on.
Now there are two schools of thought on properly tightening the wheel bearings. First is the method documented in the Toyota Factory Service Manual:

Tighten the nuts finger tight, then using a spring scale, measure and record the seal drag while turning the hub with the scale attached to a wheel stud
Then tighten the nut and re-measure the bearing drag until it reads about 3-8? lbs more than the seal drag alone.
The second method seems to produce similar results and is a bit more straight forward:

Torque spindle nut to 43 ft. lbs.
Spin hub right 4-5 rotations
Spin hub left 4-5 rotations
Loosen inner spindle nut
Spin hub right 4-5 rotations
Spin hub left 4-5 rotations
Torque spindle nut to 43 ft. lbs.
Spin hub right 4-5 rotations
Spin hub left 4-5 rotations
Loosen inner spindle nut
Spin hub right 4-5 rotations
Spin hub left 4-5 rotations
Torque spindle nut to ~21 ft. lbs.
The idea behind the second method is to ensure the bearing is fully seated in the grease and then the final torquing sets the pre-load fairly accurately. I used the second technique on my first rebuild (I didn't have a spring scale then) and I found the bearings a bit tight. In fact they seemed to be getting a bit hot on a highway trip to go wheeling. However, after two days crawling rocks, they seemed to settle right in. When I got back, I picked up a scale and measured the bearing drag and both sides were about 8 lbs. total (don't know what the oil seal drag was and I wasn't about to find out :), so I guess it worked OK.

In any event, you are on the home stretch and the procedure follows:

Put on locking tab washer
Screw outer spindle nut on till it's fairly tight
Bend one tab on the locking tab washer forward onto the inner nut and one outward onto a flat side of the outer nut
Put locking hub body on
Put cone washers and nuts on studs (coat the cone washers with anti-seize so that the next time you do this, the cone washers will just pop right out with one blow)
12mm head, torque to 23 ft. lbs.
I find that if I use a tapered punch to open up the cone washers a bit, then run a round file along the inside of the split, they go on and come off much easier
Install the lock ring on the stub axle
Install hub dial and it's 6 bolts
10mm head, torque to 10 ft. lbs.
Wash the brake rotor down with an ozone-depleting blast of brake cleaner
Bolt caliper back up
17mm head, torque to 68 ft. lbs.
Reattached brake line if it was disconnected
I like the brake hose clip on my crossover steering arms, no need to remove the brake line
Put tire/rim back on
 

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doc_sausage said:
seriously, would 80-90 gear oil be what really goes in the axle, or is this so you can change the birf's w/o oil spillage.
FSM calls for grease, gear oil would just leak out. Most of us do not run the amount of grease that the FSM calls for because of the mess when you have to change out on the trail!!!!!

Here's a really cheap trick, that can be done anytime, but is easy while you have the axle torn down. Pull those square plugs on the knuckle housing (you know the ones you try to pump grease into, not gear oil, right) and drill and tap a hole for a grease fitting. I installed a 45°angled grease Zerk in each plug and now its easy to shoot a little extra grease into the knuckle if needed. With the crossover steering arms in the way, access to those plugs is limited, but its easy to pop a grease gun on the Zerk.
Neat idea for a street rig driven in the dirt occasionally but on a trail rig unnecessary in my opinion. When I was running birfs I would pack the birf by filling the axle hole with grease and shove a short side axle in to it pushing the grease into the inside of the birf. Repeating it until the grease is coming out all the way around the balls of the birf. Then before I would install it, I would wipe the outside of the bell with about 1/8 inch of grease. You keep pumping grease into the knuckle, when you do blow a birf you will have a big mess to clean up and a lot of times it ends up somewhere on our trails in the bushes!!!!! Before you put the knuckle on pack the trunion bearings just like you do the wheel bearings. :grinpimp:
 

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I figured as much. Honestly though, the zek wouldn't do anything grease wise, grease has to be applied to the point it is needed, aka the grease through the zerk is just going onto the outside of the axle and will be sprayed onto the inside of the knuckle.

My buggy will move again tommorow, can't wait to try the 3.95 first gear, dual t-cases and 5.29's spooled. I am gonna break shit good now.
:)
 
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