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Poseur SUV
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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Ok, don't laugh but yesterday when I was out riding I came upon a situation that I didn't know how to properly deal with. My method worked but was messy and could potentially be dangerous in another situation so I'm asking you experienced riders to help me out.



I was out riding around on the country roads and I came across a neat little double-s section of road. It was about a half mile in length, smooth, flat and fairly isolated so I decided that it would be a good place to practice cornering.

I made two full passes successfully and it felt good. I started the third a little bit faster but nothing crazy. This is where my trouble began... As I reached the apex of the first curve I felt the rear tire start to slide out on me so I straightened up and let off the throttle. Of course this sent me into the oncoming lane and towards the shoulder. I managed to wobble around enough to stay on the road but even so I'd consider this "recovery" a failure.

What should I have done, or more correctly what should I do next time?
 

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Paul, I've found that cornering has more to do with where your eyes are focused than anything. I've been in the situation you describe many times and the difference between a slight throttle back and riding through the corner and straightening up and wobbling into the other lane, just like if you enter a corner too hot or miss the apex, is whether you're looking through the corner to your exit or losing your focus and doing the "OH S#%T" look at what's straight ahead/your instruments/the road in front of the tire, etc.

Sounds so simple, but so true...

My net is crap right now, so I hope this posts soon, and only once...
 

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Keep looking around the corner and keep on the throttle, by letting off, you took some traction from the back tire, not added to it, like you needed.
 

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Keeping your eyes on where you want to go helps a lot. If you find yourself looking at the edge of road straight in front of you, thats where your bike will want to go. It kind of sounds a little wierd, but it has happened to me. Don't let off in the apex if you can help it. Slow down o the encerance and accelerate through the exit.
Easier said than done. Ride safe.
 

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Focus on the corner (sometime easier said than done when learning and on a new bike) and stay on the gas but don't flog it, just stay in it and it will keep you close to your line.
 

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A lot of the technique is dependent upon the type of bike too. If its a rocket, slowly and GENTLY reduce the throttle....VERY LITTLE. Look through and hold through the turn. If its a motard, stick your foot out, stand on the gas, heat the tire up fast, and drift that bitch around. If its a couch/cruiser, ride straight as piss and pray to god you dont hit a dog, car, pothole, etc. Then go home and sell your bike.
 

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Pretty much everything has been covered.

1- Look "out of" the corner and not at the ground in front of you

2- Make sure you are using good posture... balls of feet on pegs, no weight on the bars

3- Stay off the back brake, thats for parking lots, cruisers and dirtbikes. Sportbikes and UJM's get all their stopping power out of the front

4- Stay on the throttle. Newbie instinct is "oh shit, this feels kinda fast, i need to get out of the throttle/get on the brake. This is wrong and usually ends up with you calling the insurance company or an ambulance. The throttle and the brake transfer weight... which means they transfer traction. Roll off the throttle in a corner and you just shifted traction from the back tire to the front. Get on the brake and you just shifted a BUNCH of traction from the back to the front. Hold your throttle position and you also hold your current traction front to rear.

This all applies to new guy taking some curves on a street, so dont get confused when you start reading about so-and-so trail braking on a track day. :D
 

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I have a really soft tire on the rear of my dual sport so this is a normal situation for me. as said above keep your throttle steady and ride through the corner. the farther you look through the corner the better off you are going to be because where your head goes, your bike goes. I have caught myself a few times getting way too hot into a corner and looking at the aproaching bank way too hard. guess where I ended up, in the DIRT. remember look lean push.

-Scott
 
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