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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Not to add fuel to the fire, but I was sifting through my old episodes of Extreme4x4 today and came across a clip. It is jesse welding and she is explaining the differences between mig and tig. Now her Tig welds look like mig welds and her mig welds are all tack tack tack.

Why does she do things backwards?
 

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I was going to say the same thing. Is it easier for people to do because they can't weld tubing properly?
 

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vanguard_anon said:
Later in the season they revisit the mig and tig lesson. In that one Ian and Jesse agree that the "tack, tack, tack" style is not as good because it's just a series of cold welds.
Thank fawkin gawd for that !!
 

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i saw that episode, and I think he said some people like one, others like the other, but he prefers continous. That being said, it seems like half the stuff they weld on that show breaks.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
X-Rated said:
i saw that episode, and I think he said some people like one, others like the other, but he prefers continous. That being said, it seems like half the stuff they weld on that show breaks.
Now that is the truth.
 

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X-Rated said:
are you critizing some one elses welding? :shaking:

:laughing: :laughing: :laughing:

Everything else you have reviewed is good Billavista...but on welding....any chance of a tech article? I'd read it.
 

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BillaVista said:
Not that I'm in any way qualified to give any kind of welding advice
You have a reputation for knowing what you are talking about so in this case, you might not want to give people a false impression that you know what you are talking about on this particular topic.
 

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TeenyCAR said:
You have a reputation for knowing what you are talking about so in this case, you might not want to give people a false impression that you know what you are talking about on this particular topic.
Even you yourself have said you realize that the stop/start method should only be used on sheetmetal. I would never use this for anything structural that's for sure...the whole point of a tack weld is for ease of breaking/removal.
 

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X-Rated said:
are you critizing some one elses welding? :shaking:
Well he did praise Toby's welding when posted in the thread critisizin billavistas welding and said he wished he could weld like that..............wonder if he knows :laughing:
 

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braxton357 said:
Even you yourself have said you realize that the stop/start method should only be used on sheetmetal. I would never use this for anything structural that's for sure...the whole point of a tack weld is for ease of breaking/removal.
Acutally if you go back and read through you note that while I did use this method on all the 16-14 guage plate, I also used it on materials up to 3/16" thick and consider it appropriate. Even a professional industrial welder chimed in to say that he uses this method for 3/8" thick material. The point of a tack is to hold something in place. You saw the amature demonstration of a tack tack tack weld on 1/8" thick material, so you tell me how easy it was to break off.
:shaking:
 

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the problem is people dont understand what that style is doing. If you have your welder set up to weld .120 wall tubing continuous, and you try to weld like this, it will be crap. I am not as good a welder as toby, dont claim to be. But I have watched a ton of his welding, and welded a ton of my own stuff. There are a lot of ways to weld like this wrong. You can keep the heat at the same setting, you can just pull the trigger for a very short duration, and you can just keep it pointed in one place each time you pull the trigger. If you weld like that, you will have a problem.

If on the other hand, you turn the heat up, you can hold the trigger down for right arround a second, and during that second you can start on one piece, move back toward the previous stich, and then forward about 3/8-1/2" at a time. Untill you have seen it, or praticed a lot, you just wont understand. By doing it this way you are heating and melting both base metal, pulling them into the previous stich, and it is plenty hot to get as much or more penetration that most welds dont by people who run a continuous bead.
 

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TeenyCAR said:
You have a reputation for knowing what you are talking about so in this case, you might not want to give people a false impression that you know what you are talking about on this particular topic.
That's funny right there. I'll be the first to admit my practical skill/experience is severly lacking. But that doesn't mean I don't understand the topic. In fact, the ironic thing is, quite the opposite is true. There are many who "seem" to be able to make a pretty bead that draws oohs and ahhs from the "appearance is everyhting" crowd but that in fact, especially if they advocate this continuos start and stop method in a structural weld, it is they that are demonstarting a fundamental lack of understanding of the process and metallurgy involved.

It seems a lot of people think a MIG welder is some sort of hot glue gun for metal :eek:

Oh well
 

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There's a difference between 'tack tack tack' and 'tack buzzzzzz stop tack buzzzzzzzz stop tack buzzzzzz stop'. And the difference is if your part falls off or not, and there's a difference from a continuous weld and both the above mentioned... if you are going to do tack tack tack for looks it will fail if you practice tack buzzzzzzz tack buzzzzzzzz you will get a nice looking weld and in my opinion (after testing) almost as strong as continuous. In fact when I tested continuous vs. tack/buz/stop I ripped the steel in every test never once did i rip or crack the welds. (continuous and tack buzz).

Like mentioned previously you have to run higher heat and 'know' the puddle. It's not as simple as tack tack tack. And I know I was the first to jump on TeenyCar and Toby for the tack tack but after doing my own testing and ripping steel not welds I find it a worthy method for up to 3/16". And also don't believe it shoudl be called tack tack tack it needs some other name because it is DEF not the same, it's really short puddle welding.. hrmm..

I'll start a new thread and post up a bunch o-test. (TennyCar already did this too for those interested.)
 

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Todd W said:
Like mentioned previously you have to run higher heat and 'know' the puddle. It's not as simple as tack tack tack. And I know I was the first to jump on TeenyCar and Toby for the tack tack but after doing my own testing and ripping steel not welds I find it a worthy method for up to 3/16". And also don't believe it shoudl be called tack tack tack it needs some other name because it is DEF not the same, it's really short puddle welding.. hrmm..

I'll start a new thread and post up a bunch o-test. (TennyCar already did this too for those interested.)

Watch the video. The thread is about the "tack tack tack" method. And no matter how you argue it or how many of your dimpled gussets have held using it--a series of cold welds isn't as strong as the correct continuous weld. If you want it to look pretty and still have strength there are (easy) ways to get the stack of dimes look without doing stop/start. The only reason I can ever see the need to use the tack method and the only reason I ever use it for is when mig welding thin sheetmetal that I don't want to burn through or warp.
 
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