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The dimples on the middle of every spot is an indicator that it was done by pumping the trigger.

I was surprised when I saw the welds on my driveshaft from a respected name on this board look like this. Not the typical smooth Mig on a lathe work you see from a typical shop. Thought maybe it was Tig but now I guess its' Tack-Tack ???? Seems to work well in this application though. I should crawl under and get a pic but you all have seen it anyway and it looks like this:
 

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The best thing you can do is have a camera and take pics of your work…and we can go from there.


IM in, We should start a new thread for that. Im very serious and would also be willing to pay for help and tips with my welding.
 

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What is the consensus on runing a continuous pattern (such as a string of little e's) when using a mig versus just holding the trigger and moving along at a constant angle and rate? I've heard arguments for and against it the e's. Say in the situation of a) welding two plates at 90 degress and b) welding two tubes together
 

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Engloid on that high amp tig i'm not entirely sure what they did different, i believe something with the pwoersource and some certian settings, as well as some things to get 100%duty cycle at the higher amps, and they do weld a lot higher then 230, but thats about all i know about it so your guess is as good as mine (but it is relativily new and only a few shops in my area are using it).

And yeah easiest way to help out on here is for you to take pictures and let us know your settings and technique and such.
 

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Nope.


Ian from Xtreme? THe guy on the tv show right? haha!
Yeah that's me. How do you like the Dynasty? The guys at Miller want to put one in the shop and say that I wont need a water colled torch to go with it. Curious if you use water cooled with your dynasty?

I love the input you have given on this topic, and those welds look awesome.
 

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Yeah that's me. How do you like the Dynasty? The guys at Miller want to put one in the shop and say that I wont need a water colled torch to go with it. Curious if you use water cooled with your dynasty?

I love the input you have given on this topic, and those welds look awesome.
Ian,
A water cooled torch is ALWAYS good idea. I'm sure Engloid uses/d one with his Dynasty 300. The main reason that always trumps all is that a smaller torch is better because it is more maneuverable, lighter, and less fatiguing and water cooled torches will always be smaller for a particular amperage rating. Nobody I know that welds will ever prefer the rated air-cooled torch for a job over the rated water cooled. Air cooled torches only benefit is cost and mobility. You can get by with it, but why if you don't have to?
 

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I would like to watch you guys tell the boys at Herman Motor Sports that theyer $300+K trophy truck wont hold together because they welded it wrong.:p

Most of the high end off road builders in socal that mig weld chassis use the tac tac method. Im a welding instructor at The Fab School in Riverside CA. We teach the stich metod of mig welding. When done corectly it is very strong.
 

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I would like to watch you guys tell the boys at Herman Motor Sports that theyer $300+K trophy truck wont hold together because they welded it wrong.:p

Most of the high end off road builders in socal that mig weld chassis use the tac tac method. Im a welding instructor at The Fab School in Riverside CA. We teach the stich metod of mig welding. When done corectly it is very strong.
What formal welding education did you have to aquire to become an instructor at the fab school? In your formal welding education did you ever encounter a chapter in any of the manuals that discussed using the tack tack method of welding structural members?

If not, what led you to include this method in your classes?

If it was not in your formal training, what basis did you use to establish the procedure in order to teach it properly?
 

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Ian,
A water cooled torch is ALWAYS good idea. I'm sure Engloid uses/d one with his Dynasty 300. The main reason that always trumps all is that a smaller torch is better because it is more maneuverable, lighter, and less fatiguing and water cooled torches will always be smaller for a particular amperage rating. Nobody I know that welds will ever prefer the rated air-cooled torch for a job over the rated water cooled. Air cooled torches only benefit is cost and mobility. You can get by with it, but why if you don't have to?
I agree.....I have a seperate water cooler and torch for my 185 Lincoln in my home shop....but according to the Miller reps the Dynasty works "cooler" and the water cooler is not always needed...I wanted to ask someone who uses this machine on a regular basis.
 

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Finally some sense in this thread for good welding verses tack, tack. No amount of "pretty" lightening holes with dimple dies will overcome bad welding methods. Tig all the way for me, (thats all I own).


Jeff
 

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My .02 on this, the welds joining the tubes look cold and piled up like they didn't use enough heat, should be a lot flatter than that. The gusset welds look like total shit- I honestly don't see any valid reason for doing this, structurally or cosmetically. A continuous bead would obviously be stronger and look a helluva lot better.

That tac-tac-tac crap in the pic is a prime example of a crapweld. I've done the tac-tac on areas, usually thinner material but the overlap and heat is much better.
 

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I agree.....I have a seperate water cooler and torch for my 185 Lincoln in my home shop....but according to the Miller reps the Dynasty works "cooler" and the water cooler is not always needed...I wanted to ask someone who uses this machine on a regular basis.
Haha. Damn salesmen. You can lessen the heat the torch will see with AC work because of the extended balance control. But all factors the same the Dynasty is no "cooler" and you'll want a water cooled torch. The efficient AC arc of the Dynasty is probably where that guy got that idea.
 

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I would like to watch you guys tell the boys at Herman Motor Sports that theyer $300+K trophy truck wont hold together because they welded it wrong.:p
A trophy truck? So it's main purpose is show, right? Do they show this truck at welding shows, like Fab-tech, or do they show it at truck shows where the average person knows very little about welding?

You want me to tell them it WILL break? Think I can predict the future? That's what you're asking me to do. A wouldn't hesitate a bit to tell them that a weld performed in accordance with AWS or another well-established code, would be less likely to break. As I said before, this method is used when a person lacks the skill, ability, or knowledge to perform the bead properly.
Most of the high end off road builders in socal that mig weld chassis use the tac tac method.
Most first graders may spell "dirt" as "durt." Do you want to follow their lead, or that of college professors, dictionaries, and encyclopedias?
Im a welding instructor at The Fab School in Riverside CA. We teach the stich metod of mig welding. When done corectly it is very strong.
So you are teaching welders to build chassis and home projects only, or do you think any of them will make it into the professional (and much larger) world of industrial pipe welding? If so, they will NOT make it with this tacking method. I would HIGHLY advise you to train them in accordance to AWS codes. ASME, they can learn and get experience in on the job.

Those that teach are not always the best in the field. I have been greatly disappointed in the overall ability/skill/knowledge set of the average welding instructor. I attribute this to poor hiring. Sadly, most welding instructors have students with more talent. Those that interview for these positions know nothing about welding, and think 40 years experience tops 20 years, every time. In fact, if you welded dumpsters for 40 years, you're likely not much of a welder, and a younger guy with 10 years of QUALITY experience will be a much better choice for the job. Randy, hopefully you're not one of these guys...but your teaching this method really has to make me wonder why you do this. It is about like teaching a kid addition with a calculator. They need to know the proper methods of doing things, and not be given a crutch when they have no handicap.
 

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http://www.hermanmotorsports.com/home3.htm

Lets try this again. You may be interested to take a look at the link above. Herman motor spots and many other VERY HIGH END off road car builders have endorced this techneqe. The trophy truck that I posted a pic of is a race truck not a show truck. And all of the class 1 cars and truck that HMS build uses this type of welding.

Im not here to tell you that you should use this type of welding on your pipe joints, but I dont think you have the right background to come on here and tell people that this race proven method is no good.
 

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I’ve been really busy at work, so I haven’t been able to dingle out posts and/or questions, so I’ll try and hit some really fast:

I would recommend a cooler with the Dynasty machines…unless you plan to run low amperage. It will make your torches last longer, and over the lifespan of the welding machine, that can make a big difference. It really sucks to be in middle of a job and have a torch go out, or get so hot you can’t hold it well. I also agree with the comments above about being able to go with a smaller torch, if it’s water cooled. I’ve seen some “ghetto-fab” cooler designs on the net that probably worked fine, so if money is a problem, think about making one. If you only plan to do 1/8” plate, and for short bursts at a time, you could do with a cooler…but odds are you will wind up needing to do more than that.

BTW…the Dynasty 350 is out now, and it’s pretty nice. 36 memory settings, triangular wave form, “soft square,” sine wave, and true square wave are all there to choose between. Of course the price tag is hefty, listing at something like $8300…but that would be like paying sticker price on a new car.

I am willing to help with any advice I can give. I don’t want to sound arrogant, but I am confident in my abilities. I have been around long enough to know that I am similar to the artist that picks up a pencil and can draw a perfect picture. (I can’t draw for crap though). Many people in this trade are scared to give pointers and help others, and I think it’s fear that makes them that way. They fear the competition, and they lack the confidence to overcome the competition they could create. I don’t fear competition, and I like to help others learn what I have…but in a shorter amount of time. It’s more challenging than welding something myself. Those of you that get to the skill level I have achieved, I will applaud. But I’m not worried for my job security because there’s a job for all of us, if we’re good enough at what we do.

Herman motor spots and many other VERY HIGH END off road car builders have endorced this techneqe.
So what if they’re the best available. Do you really think that means they’re the best possible? What do you think they’re going to do, tell you that they weld that way because they can’t do it a better way? I’m sure that will get them a lot of sales.
The trophy truck that I posted a pic of is a race truck not a show truck. And all of the class 1 cars and truck that HMS build uses this type of welding.
Again…they do it because of other reasons…NOT BECAUSE IT IS THE BEST METHOD!!!! Maybe it’s a skill or knowledge issue. Maybe it's just the best method they know how to do. Maybe it’s because they don’t want to put the time/effort into doing it better. Do you think they would tell you. It would be very naive of you to think that.
Im not here to tell you that you should use this type of welding on your pipe joints, but I dont think you have the right background to come on here and tell people that this race proven method is no good.
Go cry it to the AWS and the ASME…they are THE FOREMOST GOVERNING BODIES IN WELDING IN THE WORLD....and they agree with me. They don’t make these codes for only pipelines. As I said before (yet you fail to read), they do have D1.1, which is for Structural Welding of Steels. STRUCTURE means that it’s done for support or strength…not for passage of fluids. That means that the methodologies do apply to a chassis or roll cage.

How many Nascar Chassis welders do you think don’t have at least an AWS welding Certification? If Nascar has their own code, I’d bet money that it is very close to AWS in many ways, if not modeled from it.

If you put enough duct tape on the pipes, you can probably do with out welding. Would you endorse that, in the event somebody was to prove it held up? You're noting a company that probably has under 10 trucks. I'm noting an organization that has performed MILLIONS of welds in all industries known to welding.

Lets try this again.
So…how about your credentials, certifications, and justifications for teaching this method? You avoided all the above questions about your teachings.
 

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Ok I'll throw something out here. Engloid this is a sample of my Aluminum welds, not great but I never said I was a welder. Material 6061 T3, Machine Miller Syncrowave 250, 100 percent Argon gas, AC setting, Amps who knows? Set the dial to 250, foot remote. 5/32 Tungston. Welding rod Alum from my supplier. I know my eyesight ain't 20/20 anymore.
Anything I can do better?

Jeff



 

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Here's another.
same machine, material 1020 CRS 3/8" thick 5/32 Tungston, ES (sic) 70 rod
DC setting, 100 percent Argon, 15 CFM 1/8" filler rod. Amps again who knows? Set the dial to 200



Jeff
 

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Ian, when we went through the tig portion of our program a while back we were using the dynasty 300 with an air cooled tourch. But we were only doing thin guage aluminum/stainless/mild steel and the tourch wasn't getting all that hot. On the 3/8 plate we were doing however it was getting very hot and we were having a couple issues with parts on the tourch from the heat. Soo really i wouldn't use it without the water cooled, but you can get by without just fine.
 

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Ok I'll throw something out here. Engloid this is a sample of my Aluminum welds....
Anything I can do better?
Heat control is the only problem I see. WHen you get to the end of something like that, you sometimes have to drop the heat WAY down in order to compensate for the lack of material (ahead of you) to help absorb the welding heat. In other words, you may have to pull the foot pedal half way up or more to keep control of the heat at the end of the weld.

The good: The weld ties in smoothly at the "toe" (technical welding term to remember) of the welds. The toe is the side edges, where the weld ties into the base metal. It doesn't look like it's concave or excessively convex.

The best advice I can tell you on that is practice. I don't see any problems there, other than that the appearance could be better. Functionally, the weld looks just fine. Most welding codes would accept that without any problems.

Here's another.
1020 CRS 3/8" thick 5/32 Tungston, ES (sic) 70 rod
DC setting, 100 percent Argon, 15 CFM 1/8" filler rod. Amps again who knows? Set the dial to 200
Same comments about the weld profile. The bead is acceptable. You may want to clean the metal a bit better prior to welding, as it will make it easier to work with. Dirty metal will tend to want to undercut on the edges. You either didn't have undercutting problems in this piece, or you worked it slowly so you could fill it up.

At the end, taper off the heat a bit more slowly and maybe you can keep from leaving such a noticable stop. You may like 1/8 or 3/32 tungsten better. 3/32 will handle enough heat for most DC welding applications. I do not like 1/16 tungsten...even if I'm welding .006" material.

Ian: Should I leave my foot in my mouth, or remofe it now? haha!!
I sent an email in through the website, offering to help do a segment on welding. I think it would be really great for one of the shows on tv to do a segment that focuses on welding. It could really help out a lot of hobby welders and those that aspire to become pros. I have heard that the show is filmed in my home town, but I am not sure.
 
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