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1962 YellowSubmarine
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<font color="yellow"> read the other post about the $5million grant to NAS. then do this!</font c>

> URGENT ** MAXIMUM DISTRIBUTION ***
> URGENT ** MAXIMUM DISTRIBUTION
> *****
>
> THE "GRASSROOTS" ALMOST HAVE A WIN ON FORD!
> IMMEDIATE ACTION ON THIS IS
> VITALLY IMPORTANT SO THAT WE CAN SHOW OTHER
> GREEN-GIVING CORPORATIONS AND
> FOUNDATION THAT WE HAVE THE NUMBERS, THE POCKETBOOKS
> AND THE VOICE TO
> NEGATIVELY IMPACT THEIR BOTTOM LINE.
>
> Two (2) Articles Attached
>
> Folks, I just spoke with Charles Child, News Editor
> of Automotive News. He
> says that Ford Motor Co. is in deep financial
> trouble and that their
> economic Mainstay is the F-series Pick-up truck He
> also stated that Ford is
> still the leading seller of Pick-up trucks in the
> US. If anything, we must
> increase the pressure against FORD.
>
> LET FORD HEAR THUNDER FROM GRASSROOTS AMERICA NOW!
>
> Please read the below two articles and then do the
> two quick, easy and FREE
> complaints.
>
> WRITE the Green Giver, Sandra E. Ulsh , Vice
> President of the Ford Motor
> Company Fund, at [email protected] as soon as
> possible.
>
> CALL FORD at 800 392-3673, at the first prompt enter
> 3, At second prompt
> enter 2. At that time you will be asked to enter
> your 10 Digit Telephone
> number, Then you will be linked to a live person who
> will do a VERY complete
> interview about your complaint.
>
> (800) 232-5952 (TDD for the Hearing Impaired)
>
> Thanks,
>
> Jay
>
>
____________________________________________________________________
> Ford's Audubon donation irks ranchers $5 million
> contribution costs Ford
> sales among Western U.S. land interests
>
> By Mary Connelly Automotive News / October 08, 2001
>
> Ford Motor Co. ads show cowboys proudly using the
> company's pickups. But a
> growing number of cowboys out West are angry enough
> with Ford to start
> driving Chevrolets.
> Ranchers, loggers, miners and agricultural business
> interests are protesting
> Ford's environmental attitudes, specifically, a $5
> million contribution to
> the National Audubon Society.
> On Wednesday, Oct. 3, Ford dispatched two executives
> to Arizona to meet with
> three agricultural associations. One of the groups
> represents 4,000 elected
> or appointed agricultural and natural resource
> officials in 16 states and
> Guam.
> Ford is embroiled in a passionate and divisive
> debate in the West over land
> use and natural resources. Led by Chairman William
> Clay Ford Jr., an avowed
> environmentalist, the automaker has cast itself as
> an environmentally
> friendly company. For example, Bill Ford led the
> automotive industry in
> acknowledging the existence of global warming.
> Now, Ford Division dealers say the company's
> attitude is contributing to
> lost sales among ranchers, miners, loggers and
> farmers in the western United
> States.
> "Ford has donated money to environmental groups. One
> of them is the National
> Audubon Society. These environmental groups are
> spending a lot of money
> putting timber, livestock grazing and everything
> else out of business in the
> West,'' said Doc Lane, director of natural resources
> for the 2,000-member
> Arizona Cattle Ranchers Association and a meeting
> participant. "Our concern
> is why would Ford be paying to put their customers
> out of business?''
> Last week, the protesting groups asked Ford to
> underwrite a
> multi-million-dollar national educational campaign
> promoting American
> agricultural and forestry products.
> Last week's meeting followed a similar session this
> month in Montana with
> protesting members of the logging industry.
> Lost sales
> "These are not just complaints. This is costing
> sales,'' said Udon
> McSpadden, owner of McSpadden Ford-Lincoln-Mercury
> in Glove, Ariz., and a
> meeting participant. "There were three people in the
> cattle ranching
> industry in the meeting that drove Fords their whole
> life and who now own
> General Motors products for the first time.''
> Bird-watching money
> A $5 million Ford Motor Co. Fund contribution to the
> National Audubon
> Society triggered the protest. The money was
> earmarked for "bird monitoring
> and environmental education programs,'' said Brook
> Galbraith, Ford fund
> spokeswoman.
> The Ford fund is the philanthropic arm of Ford Motor
> Co.
> No members of the Ford family are officers or on the
> board of the Ford fund,
> Galbraith said.
> "The Ford Fund has assured Ford Division that they
> will be more cognizant of
> customer and dealer concerns when making future
> contribution decisions,"
> said John Jelinek, Ford Division spokesman.
> The protesters fault Ford for contributing to an
> organization whose goals
> are at odds with their own.
> "We just want Ford to work with American
> agriculture,'' said Olin Sims, a
> Wyoming rancher and chairman of the Western
> Coalition of Conservation
> Districts. Created by Congress in the early 1940s,
> conservation districts
> exist in every state and are units of local
> government charged with
> protecting natural resources. The Western Coalition
> represents 752 districts
> with more than 4,000 elected or appointed officials
> in 16 states and Guam.
> Promoting agriculture
> "We have asked Ford to commit to investing back into
> American agriculture
> through promoting American agriculture and forestry
> products,'' said Sims, a
> meeting participant. "We would like to hear back
> from them in 45 days.''
> The Ford fund did not attend last week's meeting,
> Galbraith said. J.C.
> Collins, Ford Division executive dealer relations
> manager, and John
> Oldfield, Ford's Phoenix-area regional manager,
> represented Ford at the
> two-hour meeting, dealer McSpadden said.
> # # #
>
_____________________________________________________________________
> Lordy, Mr. Ford, Who's Side Are You On?
> Ford Motor Company funds Environmental Activists and
> lobbies for Higher Gas
> Taxes while the Ford Foundation Funds Palestinian
> Organizations.
> By Laura Schneberger
>
> Article made possible by a public education grant
> from the Paragon
> Foundation
>
> It is hard to imagine Henry Ford approving the
> direction his great grandson
> is taking the once proud Ford Motor Company. While
> the Ford product is still
> an outstanding purchase for its durability and
> usability--the common man can
> no longer justify the expense of owning one.
> It's not that the vehicles are out of a working
> stiff's price range; the
> fact of the matter is, many Ford fans feel
> contributing to the success of
> Ford Motor Company is simply not in their best
> interest. Many Ford owners
> belong to the nations agricultural community and
> Ford has recently changed
> its social activism agenda to exclude concern for
> the welfare and livelihood
> of rural Ford buyers. This major focus on social
> change began when Bill
> Ford, Jr. took over as CEO of Ford Motor Company
> just a little over a year
> ago.
> In February, 2001, Ford provided the National
> Audubon Society with a 5
> million dollar grant. Ford Motor Company says the
> grant was intended to fund
> environmental education and bird monitoring
> projects. Farmers and ranchers
> along the Klamath Basin know Audubon as one of the
> biggest of the
> non-government organizations that joined in the suit
> to force the U.S. Fish
> and Wildlife Service to shut down water in the
> Klamath Basin, in April of
> this year, to protect the suckerfish. A move that
> deprived over
> 1400 families of their livelihoods, will eventually
> cost them their homes
> and turn the area into a dustbowl. A move that
> destroyed habitat and killed
> countless species of birds dependent on the areas
> wildlife preserve. Klamath
> Falls is only the latest in a series of Audubon
> victims.
> Laura Busby, of Marion, Arkansas says she will never
> buy another Ford. She
> told the company, "You should know that the Audubon
> society and the Sierra
> Club sued to stop the Main River Levee Project in
> the Mississippi River
> Delta. Ms. Busby predicts 4.5 million people have
> been put at risk because
> of the suit. "Allowing the Mississippi to flood
> naturally will cause a
> disaster that will take 300 billion dollars to clean
> up after," she says.
> It doesn't end there; the Ford Foundation also funds
> the Center for
> Watershed and Community Health in Oregon. One of the
> major goals of this
> organization is to ensure the survival of the
> dubiously endangered Coho
> salmon. Klamath Falls farmers, like Stanley Meager,
> are undoubtedly familiar
> with this organization. In a May 15th letter to
> Ford, Mr. Meager told the
> company, "I have been a Ford man all my life, I am
> now 59 years old, but
> that has come to an end. You are supplying my
> enemies with the means to
> destroy my home and my way of life, I refuse to aid
> in this travesty of
> injustice."
> Ford also gave 10 million to the international
> headquarters of the Forest
> Stewardship Council. The grant was provided to
> expand its forest
> certification program. "This major grant will
> strengthen our ability to
> expand holistic forest stewardship worldwide and to
> meet the growing demand
> for FSC certified products," said FSC Executive
> Director, Maharaj Muthoo.
> "It also assures that this work will continue to
> contribute not only to
> preserving the planet's living legacy but also to
> improving the lives and
> incomes of millions of people in forest dependant
> communities."
> Lofty goals, but according to a list of certified
> forests compiled on their
> web site, the FSC has consistently refused to
> certify federal land forests
> in the United States. Removal of timber harvest,
> from the Pacific Northwest
> down through the Southwest, has devastated thousands
> of individuals, wreaked
> economies, and created poverty in forest dependant
> communities. When a
> forest is certified by FSC it is deemed
> environmentally correct and
> supposedly, will have a better market for lumber
> than a forest that is
> uncertified. A lot of power for a non-government
> organization to be
> wielding.
> Each year The Ford Foundation sends over 30 million
> dollars to
> environmentally friendly, non-government
> organizations. NGOs like the
> Rainforest Alliance initiative, Ecotrust, Certified
> Forest Products Council,
> World Wildlife Federation, Environmental Defense
> Fund, Environmental Law
> Alliance, and Environmental Justice Fund, all have
> acted in ways that have
> had a profound negative impact on the rural
> economies of the United States.
> On February 8, 2000, John Elkington, Chairman of
> Sustainability, a leading
> global organization counseling companies on the
> subject of sustainability,
> interviewed Bill Ford, Chairman of the Board of Ford
> Motor Company, about
> Ford's corporate responsibility:
> Mr. Elkington asks, "Didn't Ford try to lobby for
> higher gasoline taxes
> several years back?"
> BF: "Yes, we did." JE: "Were you surprised it didn't
> work politically?" BF:
> "No. Sadly, there's no political will to do that."
> JE: "Would you try
> again?" BF: "We certainly would support it. The real
> issue, though, is that
> we can't be in the business of dictating what the
> customer wants to buy.
> What we can do is make sure that whatever customers
> buy is done as
> responsibly as it possibly can. I'll give you an
> example, the Excursion,
> which many environmentalists point to as the
> ultimate bad vehicle. The
> Sierra Club affectionately calls it 'the Ford
> Valdez.'"
> Bill Ford happily admits to a long association with
> environmental
> organizations, even the radical ones. He was a key
> speaker at the 5th Annual
> Greenpeace Business conference in London, where he
> made it clear who he was.
> He states, "We're at a crucial point in the world's
> history. Our oceans and
> forests are suffering, species are disappearing and
> the climate is changing.
> Around the world, billions of our fellow human
> beings lack the most basic
> requirements of health and dignity."
> Since Bill ford took over as Chairman of Ford Motor
> Company another
> startling fact has come to light. Among the hundreds
> of grants given out by
> the Ford Foundation every year and recorded in the
> Ford Foundation grants
> database, the year of 2001 showed a dramatic
> increase in funding for
> Palestinian organizations. There are at least 20
> Palestinian organizations
> in the Foundations database. Though many are
> legitimate beneficiaries of
> corporate funding, several of them cannot be reached
> since the September
> attack on the nation's airlines, the Pentagon, and
> the World Trade Center.
> In this time of uncertainty, Ford and other
> cooperate philanthropists, need
> to be clear on whom they are funding.
> The 40,000-dollar grant Ford gave to the West Banks
> Hawwa Center for Culture
> and Arts, purpose was to strengthen its ability to
> respond to the
> Israeli-Palestinian crisis in the West Bank and Gaza
> Strip. Ghada Abed
> Al-Hadai, the head of the Center has been publicly
> quoted as saying, "The
> current crucial situation demands a complete
> readiness for the next step
> towards Al-Aqsa Intifada." Mrs. Ghada mentioned the
> role of women in all the
> steps of the Palestinian struggle against the
> Israeli Occupation Forces.
> Tamer Institute for Community Education (West Bank),
> located in Cairo Egypt,
> received 300,000 dollars from the Ford foundation in
> 2001. The purpose of
> this grant was to strengthen the role of young
> people as agents of social
> change within their communities. Though there is a
> link on the Foundation's
> website to access the organization, it has recently
> become unavailable.
> Ford Motor Company would probably plead ignorance
> and innocence to funding
> organizations that do not promote peace in the
> Middle East. Just as they
> have when confronted with the facts of what their
> environmental giving has
> done to rural America.
> Bill Ford, in an interview with Time Magazine said,
> "For some companies, the
> issue is basic human rights. For Ford Motor Company,
> it will be revealed
> more subtly, as we explore our impact on communities
> beyond the gates of our
> factories or those of our suppliers. The landscape
> of accountability has
> changed and so has the criteria for leadership."
> At this time, Ford Motor Company's leadership
> certainly seems more inclined
> to care about the opinions of radical
> environmentalists and human rights in
> the Gaza Strip than the human rights of American
> citizens.
> The views expressed in this article are not
> necessarily the views of the
> Paragon Foundation. This article is provided in the
> interest of public
> education. The Paragon Foundation may be reached at
> 1-877-847-3443.
> J. Zane Walley
> Live in The City, and have problems? Call 911
> Live in the Country and have problems? Join Paragon
> 1-877-847-3445
> http://www.paragonpowerhouse.org/mission.htm
 
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