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You guys might get a kick out of this. I mainly post on thecj2apage. The community is helpful and aided in my first restoration in high school: a CJ3A into a fake MB. I purposely stayed away from Pirate Willys to save my wallet. After making it all pretty, I yearned for another rig to beat on the trails without remorse. The college project.




My buddy bought this Jeep a few years ago. It was his first flat fender, and assumed it was original. He quickly realized this 1946 CJ2A had an M151 Mutt drivetrain. The greatest part about a Mutt was their fully waterproof drivetrains. A fording valve locks in engine pressure to prevent water coming in, along with a waterproof distributor, generator, and spark plug wires.



The body was homemade from the dash back. My buddy parked the Jeep under a shelter and that's where it sat. Soon enough he bought more Jeeps (I may have been an influence...), and she remained untouched.




Story goes by the original family their grandpa wanted to go a little faster. After Vietnam, he installed the M151 "powerpack" and rebuilt the body. It spent its days plowing in Colorado, being pulled across the country behind an RV, and finally retired to towing a hotdog stand.





I visited his motorpool and fell in love with the Jeep. I had to have it. Eventually we agreed on a partial trade GPW project for Queen Mary, the "Submarine Jeep."


It became harder to sleep at night. All I did was dream about how the Jeep would look and perform. My greatest influence is "Bam Bam" the Willys MB. Jeff started the "super stock" build trend and I wanted to join. His build looks nearly identical to a standard WWII Jeep, but is completely modified.

The Mutt drivetrain was perfect for a super stock build. It has optimal capability and fits relatively well inside the body. Safety is always important, therefore a cage was necessary. As well as snorkels.




Build Specs
1946 CJ2A chassis
Welded rear axle
M151A2 drivetrain
SAS theme MB body
M38 hood
Full cage
Electric fan; engine snorkels
Agriculture tires
Front disc brakes; dual master cylinder
 

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I picked this up in August 2016 and will show the progress this far. I mainly worked during class breaks.

Assessing the ugly: Mona Lisa of transmission tunnels, a rusted tight transmission, and cancerous body.




My first accomplishment was body repair. I have never truly welded in a patch panel, and this was the perfect opportunity to learn. I'm blessed to have a full machine shop and tons of space to work in.




To recreate the MB body, I needed to add the tool slots. I used measurements off two original tubs and carefully outlined the drawing. Halfway through cutting my newly patched sides, I thought "What have I done..."
But it turned out beautiful.






I chopped down the tailgate, spun 180, and welded in place.


 

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Fred Flintstone would've been proud of this floor. It was satisfied hacking the old metal out. Initially I was just going to replace the passenger side, but it was almost easier starting from scratch.






I actually drove the Jeep down the road once. The transmission wouldn't shift into 1st or 2nd at all. This was concerning as the Mutt didn't have a low range, just a granny gear. Just my luck I found an entire powerpack for $200. My real bonus was the waterproof 24V generator mine was missing. That piece alone is worth its weight in gold.

A couple batteries and I had this engine running. My current engine had 125 lbs compression across all four cylinders. This one varied between 90 and 100.



This tranny appears to be recently rebuilt. It was cheaper to buy this entire setup than the individual parts for mine. My master plan is to use my engine, this tranny/tcase (they're one unit) and a new clutch while it's apart.



Out of curiosity, I brought the Jeep outside for a flex test. Note the MB grille I rescued from a junkyard and M38 hood.
16" front
18" rear




I had dreams about cutting these horrid fenders off. It was pleasing to attack the diamond plate with a grinder. You can see this tub was rewrapped in metal. Unfortunately the rust left its mark on the fenders as well.


 

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The past weekend I was home, I thought it just might be possible to lay a coat of primer across the tub. With the body a single color, I could tell where it needed bondo assistance. Not to mention visual satisfaction. So I put long hours finishing the patches and running the wire wheel.



I knew this tub was full of bondo. There's about 1/4'' across most the sides. Yes, there were many a fire during patch panels. Knowing this I stopped sanding once I hit the bondo. There's no point taking it off to reapply.



Unfortunately I ran out of time. This is where she lies.




Blinded by excitement, I didn't realize how mangled the frame was. The frame horns were bent down about 2" and cobbled from various pieces of angle iron.



I sold this frame to a buddy last year and bought it back. It's sandblasted and ready to rock. This gives me an excuse to completely disassemble the Jeep and paint it right.



Spring break starts in a few days. I've ordered more parts than what the Jeep is currently worth! Most of it is brakes and misc mechanical pieces. I'm looking forward to an original Mutt transmission cover to finally mockup my tranny tunnel, and a test tractor tire. Hopefully I can begin building up the new frame and transfer parts over.

First drive: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EzvfpPw25BM
Overview: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qzNl8oLHYYs
Flex test: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7bt6VXDBn2s
 

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Discussion Starter #11 (Edited)
Thanks guys! My work space is heaven.

Nice work, looks like you've got quite a good camera as well.
I'm in love with the camera. It's a Nikon D750.



Today I worked hard, installing agrijeep tires and such. It turns out I have M38 rims with an extra safety bead and 3/8'' positive offset.




At first I was weary of the 6.00x16 tires, but they actually look great (and sit a bit taller than normal 6.00's).




Googly eyes was brought out of hibernation for some comparison.
Sub Jeep tires are 28.5'' MB are 29.5''




Believe it or not, I drove the sub to this location. I've learned a few things:
1. The awful engine noise in my early videos was just a fan clearance issue
2. Civilian fuel pump works well
3. Smokes like a banshee - but not necessary to complete any serious work. This exact project is a non-proven concept... and there is always a possibility of engine destruction. I'm pretty good at breaking things.




This week should be the Parade of Progress. Tons of parts came in but not all of them. The plan is to work hard and see where we end up.
 

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I found an original M151 transmission cover. It looks nicer than anything I could fabricate, so I'm building sides around it. This part is time consuming. Each piece has weld nuts for quick removal.



I only mocked up the passenger side metal. I wanted an idea of the cover location, so I can work after the body is removed. This was the piece holding me up on disassembling the Jeep. Eventually a piece of metal will be welded to the tranny cover and angle nicely to the dash.




We have a major pedal dilemma. You can see the tranny cover extends against the brake pedal, leaving zero room for a gas pedal. If you look at my first post, the "original" gas pedal was a tiny lever coming off the fiberglass.

My only idea is to cut the flat piece off the brake pedal shaft, and slide it to the left. Probably turned 90 degrees as well. Then I just might have room for the gas.

 

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I'm really digging this build, nice to see some new ideas.

What is the gearing like in the M151 stuff? I have a recollection it was like the stock flat fender gearing overall, but with only 4 total gears in the transmissionfercase. 1st gear was down on the 5-6:1 range.
 

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I think it's 5.90:1, but curious if that's right.

Really a neat little transmission, it does look like it's hanging down quite a bit. Is there any possibility you can raise it up a bit more and maybe shift it towards the passenger side for gas pedal clearance?

Another possibility..... since you have two transmission cases (you sorta have a spare to experiment with) you could cut off the bottom of the housing (where the front output shaft is), weld a panel on it and hook the main shaft output to something like a divorced samurai t-case, would really help you with gearing and ground clearance but might be a challenge for driveshafts, among other things...!

Here's a link to what little I could dig up on this interesting little transmission

http://www.pirate4x4.com/forum/jeep-willys/1638274-tech-babble-whats-perfect-tranny-go-behind-perfect-engine-flatty.html#post24172026
 

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Discussion Starter #15
I'm really digging this build, nice to see some new ideas.

What is the gearing like in the M151 stuff? I have a recollection it was like the stock flat fender gearing overall, but with only 4 total gears in the transmissionfercase. 1st gear was down on the 5-6:1 range.
Thanks! Your build thread is the reason I told myself I shouldn't get on here. I often wonder if the original builder is looking down upon my refurbish. Who woulda thought the Jeep survived.

I found this info on Steel Soldiers:

Gearbox
Input torque rating 120 lbs.ft (16,6 kg.m )
1 gear 5.712:1
2 gear 3.179:1
3 gear 1.674:1
4 gear 1.0:1
reverse 7.497:1

Tranny 1:1

Diff
Torque rating 800 lbs.ft (110,95 kg.m )
Ratio 4.86:1

However, the M151 Mutt axle ratio is 4.88 while a CJ2A is 5.38. I'm not sure about exact speeds in 1st and 2nd gear, but I have an advantage. Both vehicles are lightweight. The guy who built the M151 rock crawler experienced gearing problems, but his rig was full of heavy tubing.

Really a neat little transmission, it does look like it's hanging down quite a bit. Is there any possibility you can raise it up a bit more and maybe shift it towards the passenger side for gas pedal clearance?

Another possibility..... since you have two transmission cases (you sorta have a spare to experiment with) you could cut off the bottom of the housing (where the front output shaft is), weld a panel on it and hook the main shaft output to something like a divorced samurai t-case, would really help you with gearing and ground clearance but might be a challenge for driveshafts, among other things...!
The tranny is deceiving! Now this only shows the front whereas the rear output sits a few inches lower. Truthfully this is no lower than a standard MB/CJ2A.

Modifying the tranny sounds like fun. For the moment I'll run what I have and see how it performs. Worst case I'll change the setup down the road. My timeline is to be finished by August, so my buddies and I can go wheeling during the semester. Testing and tuning is hard work, you know.



Do I keep the hydraulically assisted clutch setup, or make my own linkage? I can't decide if its worth redoing. My concern is submerging another cylinder. More to go wrong. Thoughts welcome.



And the generator is pretty close to the reservoir. I'm not sure if it generates heat out the back, but I'd probably relocate the reservoir (and buy new cylinders).



Then...
I killed it.





The powerpack is cool. Yank everything out of the vehicle without separation.

 

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The engine smoke will blind and choke everyone in a 20 foot radius. I'm gonna have to do a valve job. Here's a video of this week's progress: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bcV1FYWfCfs

All that remains...



Shocks were shot. But not as shot as those bushings!



Rear drums didn't look bad. They popped right off. I'm rebuilding these with all new parts.

 

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What an adventure.

Rebuilt the rear brakes, and will be converting all the lugs to RH thread as LH is ridiculous to me.
Also in the process installed the "new" frame I acquired.



After spending hours fighting the front leaf spring mounts, I discovered the whole frame was twisted. I debating repairing my original frame but found it is beginning to rot all over. A replacement is on the way.

Notice how far off the leaf springs are in comparison to the hangers.




Axles were wire brushed and fitted with Chevy front disc brake conversion.



I believe the Geo Tracker conversion is the best kit on a stock Jeep, especially if you're using stock wheels. Even with a 1/4 spacer I'm slightly rubbing the caliper bolts. I'll most likely grind the edge off them. All in all, I love these beastly brakes (even if it requires some extra effort).



I also found out my piston rings are bad, which is what causes the smoke. I put a teaspoon of oil in the cylinders and went from 130 to 140 compression on the front 3 cylinders, with the rear still remaining at 130. I'll leave the engine until August and see where I'm at before I decide to rebuild before school, or a later date. I might rebuild the spare engine myself for fun.

Now I'm working on the tub to keep up motivation.



At least it looked kinda neat on 3 wheels.

 

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Finally finished the tranny cover. It was a challenge to ride the fine line between looks and function. As the tranny sits so tall, options are limited.



I welded a plate to the M151 piece that extends to the dash, and have trim to cover the gap. It turned out great.




Every bolt has a weldnut. Easy in - easy out.
Not that we're ever going to take it out... right? Right?



And then karma strikes.



To keep my Jeep in the "super stock" class I knew it needed original-style seat frames.
Given my time constraints and fabrication skills, this is what I've come up with:



Of course there isn't a straight line on this tub. It took me hours to line each set nearly perfect.



Karma struck again - the passenger frame was completely different than the driver.

Driver: Moved bottom supports under the main tubes, rather than the standard position on top. This keeps both bottom seat cushions even. Passenger: The actual lean of the seats are different as well, this is because an original Jeep has to accommodate for the toolbox. I fixed that with a BFH.

Yes the seat back lines aren't in the same location - I found this out there's a 1" difference in back supports. But the top lips are even.

And yes a bird poo'd on my seat.



Tub primer next week?
 
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