Pirate 4x4 banner

1 - 20 of 34 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,566 Posts
Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Ive seen and admired quite a few "stitch welds" on here over the years. How do you guys make the weld (length) and spacing between welds so similar from one weld to the next. Is there a trick? Ive seen some on here that look factory. Obviously I know you can lay it all out before hand with a sharpie but for me it gets hard to see start and stop lines through a hood. Advise? How do you know how close/far to put them?

example

 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,261 Posts
Silver or white sharpie has good enough contrast for me, but I'm no pro.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8,130 Posts
Paint marker and a bit of math. Find the center and space them out evenly. Pretty straight forward really.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,308 Posts
When I lay mine out, I put a tack at the stopping point of the stitch so I know that's the stopping point. Start welding on the the sharpie (or soapstone) mark and weld your way into the tack. Just be sure to make them small so your bead will flow right into and not be a globbed up pile of shit.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
10,512 Posts
Soapstone or welding crayon/grease pencil. As for layout, few ft of a strip of template paper or something with lengths of stops and starts. If it's short arc like I'm guessing, a quick tack will get a stopping point you can see no matter what
 

·
Lost
Joined
·
123 Posts
Do the math to set spacing. Black (cheap) Sharpie at start points. While welding count the number of a steps/weaves in your patten (usually 6 per inch). Replete each stitch with the same count, no need to see an endpoint through hood. Assuming you're a consistent welder.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,566 Posts
Discussion Starter #9
When I lay mine out, I put a tack at the stopping point of the stitch so I know that's the stopping point. Start welding on the the sharpie (or soapstone) mark and weld your way into the tack. Just be sure to make them small so your bead will flow right into and not be a globbed up pile of shit.
Soapstone or welding crayon/grease pencil. As for layout, few ft of a strip of template paper or something with lengths of stops and starts. If it's short arc like I'm guessing, a quick tack will get a stopping point you can see no matter what
Both of these great suggestions, had not thought of doing it that way.
Do the math to set spacing. Black (cheap) Sharpie at start points. While welding count the number of a steps/weaves in your patten (usually 6 per inch). Replete each stitch with the same count, no need to see an endpoint through hood. Assuming you're a consistent welder.
Never realized the rule of thumb was 6 weaves per inch, good to know!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,277 Posts
Paint pen or silver sharpie is the easiest answer. Others have different ways and whatever works is just fine. Don't take the "rule of thumb" on weaves per inch too seriously as there are 8000 ways to skin a cat, 4000 are wrong but the other 4000 are just fine. 6 weaves per inch sounds like you are welding at a pretty hot setting on the welder, not wrong, just what I am picturing when thinking that spacing.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,295 Posts
I would end with vice grips welded all over my project.

I'm trying to always remember that not every inch has to be welded, I can stitch it and be fine.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
526 Posts
When I lay mine out, I put a tack at the stopping point of the stitch so I know that's the stopping point. Start welding on the the sharpie (or soapstone) mark and weld your way into the tack. Just be sure to make them small so your bead will flow right into and not be a globbed up pile of shit.
This, also, having a clean lens will help you. Get a silver streak at a welding store, it works far better for marking metal, and won't stop working like a sharpie.

On prints it'll be written to the right of the weld symbol. 2"-4" would translate to 2" weld length with a 4" pitch. Pitch is measure from center to center. Most of the time in production welding the jigs will just have marks where all the stitch welds would go.

If I'm working on my own stuff I just lay down a tape measure and mark it out, or eyeball it if it's small stuff.

While welding count the number of a steps/weaves in your patten (usually 6 per inch). Replete each stitch with the same count, no need to see an endpoint through hood. Assuming you're a consistent welder.
Never heard of this. My old teacher would flip shit if you said something like that. The only time I will whip with MIG is for heat control, or out of position. Otherwise it's straight and true. But I'm really anal about my welds being as strong as possible.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,066 Posts
What ever way works best for what your doing

fancy jobs got laid out with soap stone.

Not so fancy how ever it worked out was fine.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,545 Posts
My stitch welds look terrible even when I mark them, but I wanted to add that sharpie now has high heat markers for sale at Lowes. The marking doesn't melt off as your bead approaches, which I find useful.
 
1 - 20 of 34 Posts
Top