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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Hey, I have a 93 pick up. I am going to be fixing the frame and Im sure this has been asked a hundred times but I have a few questions. The leaf spring's front hanger on the frame has just about rotted off and I need to fix that as well as numerous holes in the frame. I have a 110 DC mig that I will be using. My main question is how thick is the steel on the frame? Should I use 1/4 steel to patch it? Or is that overkill?
Also does any one know if these leaf spring hangers are sold anywhere that I could weld onto the new material? Any advice would be awesome
 

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The problem I found with mine was that it rusts out from the inside. By the time the damage shows up on the outside you're fighting a losing battle. After the third repair, I built a new frame.
 

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The problem I found with mine was that it rusts out from the inside. By the time the damage shows up on the outside you're fighting a losing battle. After the third repair, I built a new frame.
damn i dont want to hear that. my frame has a pretty serious rust spot where the rear spring hanger is on the inside and i was hoping to just cutout and plate/replace it.

bill i planned on just using some 1/8" since thats how it came from the factory. why not split the difference and use 3/16"? that might be the route i take.
 

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damn i dont want to hear that. my frame has a pretty serious rust spot where the rear spring hanger is on the inside and i was hoping to just cutout and plate/replace it.

bill i planned on just using some 1/8" since thats how it came from the factory. why not split the difference and use 3/16"? that might be the route i take.
3/16 would be the best - I've been fighting this uphill battle for years and I've patched it at least 3 or 4 times in various spots.

If I need to patch it again then the frame is just getting cut off and I'll build my own with 2x3 3/16 rectangle tubing. I wish I would have done this from day 1
 

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3/16 would be the best - I've been fighting this uphill battle for years and I've patched it at least 3 or 4 times in various spots.

If I need to patch it again then the frame is just getting cut off and I'll build my own with 2x3 3/16 rectangle tubing. I wish I would have done this from day 1
damn im sure hoping not to have to build a frame. i will see next month when tear down starts.
 

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I've seen rusted Toy frames break on the trail. Not a good place to break a frame. If it's rusted through it's prolly shot.
 

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Sounds like a good back half build...

Wouldn't even waste my time, like everyone says, it's a losing battle.
 

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The rails are 3/16" wall. I used 1/4" plate for the gussetts on mine. At least, it won't break at the joint. I back halved mine, and stuck a cleaner frame section under the rear. Of course, it was solid from the center forward. Just from the back of the cab, rearward, was rotten. Otherwise, it sounds like you have the same rot I had. Just patching it, is an uphill battle. You'll find yourself fixing it every 1-2 years. Mine's an 86, and I used a 95 4runner rear I picked up for a song. I would've used the whole frame, but I have an X-tra cab. So, I stretched it by using the 86 front half. Of course, check your state laws. Here, we can do it, as long as it's done by a professional shop. So, I had a place do it for me so it's street legal.
 

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For me, the first repair was on the inside of the frame rails at the "dogleg" where the frame kicks up from the cab to under the bed.

Welding on a couple strips of 1" wide x 3/16" thick stock got it past inspection for that year.

Two years later there were holes opening up around the previous repairs. Ground the stock back off and cut some 3/16" plates to cover things up.

Another year and I had some new holes opening up. Ground the previous repairs off and took a needle scaler to the frame rails to see how bad things were. Ended up with half a five gallon bucket full of rust flakes, larger pieces, and accumulated debris. The scary thing was that there was now a hole in the frame rail under the passenger side door that was over half the height of the frame rail and over a foot long... :eek: There had been very minimal signs of there even being a problem there when I started.

I cut plates to cover everything up to get it past inspection, but started building the frame after that.

What I had found was that there was a lot of dirt and debris inside the frame rails. This just trapped moisture in there. With the salt they put on the roads in the winter around here, I'm sure that was collecting in there as well. All of that causes it to rust from the inside out. There were places where the undercoating on the exterior was about all that was left.

If, from new, you made a point of flushing out the debris from the frame rails and regularly coating it inside the rails with some sort of creeping oil undercoating, you might stand a chance of preventing this. But I really feel that once you notice rust-through, it's the beginning of the end.
 

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Of course, it was solid from the center forward. Just from the back of the cab, rearward, was rotten.
That's what really scared me about the hole I found under the passenger door. Very little sign of it and everything I found on the internet was saying back by the dogleg was the problem.

Did a search and found this image. But it isn't the only one I've seen in that shape.

 

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That's what really scared me about the hole I found under the passenger door. Very little sign of it and everything I found on the internet was saying back by the dogleg was the problem.

Did a search and found this image. But it isn't the only one I've seen in that shape.

That's what 99% of them around here look like. Just look at mine. They throw down soo much salt, I have a CLEAN bed. It exists. :eek:



But, here's what it looked like after patching it 3 times.

 

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Discussion Starter #15
For me, the first repair was on the inside of the frame rails at the "dogleg" where the frame kicks up from the cab to under the bed.

Welding on a couple strips of 1" wide x 3/16" thick stock got it past inspection for that year.

Two years later there were holes opening up around the previous repairs. Ground the stock back off and cut some 3/16" plates to cover things up.

Another year and I had some new holes opening up. Ground the previous repairs off and took a needle scaler to the frame rails to see how bad things were. Ended up with half a five gallon bucket full of rust flakes, larger pieces, and accumulated debris. The scary thing was that there was now a hole in the frame rail under the passenger side door that was over half the height of the frame rail and over a foot long... :eek: There had been very minimal signs of there even being a problem there when I started.

I cut plates to cover everything up to get it past inspection, but started building the frame after that.

What I had found was that there was a lot of dirt and debris inside the frame rails. This just trapped moisture in there. With the salt they put on the roads in the winter around here, I'm sure that was collecting in there as well. All of that causes it to rust from the inside out. There were places where the undercoating on the exterior was about all that was left.

If, from new, you made a point of flushing out the debris from the frame rails and regularly coating it inside the rails with some sort of creeping oil undercoating, you might stand a chance of preventing this. But I really feel that once you notice rust-through, it's the beginning of the end.
Appreciate the the advice from every one. The only thing is that I actually dont do hard core off roading. I mainly use the truck for hauling my dirtbike, so even if it is the begining of the end do you think it would be worth patching up due to the fact that I mainly drive it on the road (even though there are some massive potholes here in rochester ny haha). How much long does it usually take to remove the bed of the truck? (assuming everything comes apart)
 

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Appreciate the the advice from every one. The only thing is that I actually dont do hard core off roading. I mainly use the truck for hauling my dirtbike, so even if it is the begining of the end do you think it would be worth patching up due to the fact that I mainly drive it on the road (even though there are some massive potholes here in rochester ny haha). How much long does it usually take to remove the bed of the truck? (assuming everything comes apart)
I've got it down to 30 - 45 minutes. The first time took all day since every damn bolt was seized; expect the latter.
 

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Appreciate the the advice from every one. The only thing is that I actually dont do hard core off roading. I mainly use the truck for hauling my dirtbike, so even if it is the begining of the end do you think it would be worth patching up due to the fact that I mainly drive it on the road (even though there are some massive potholes here in rochester ny haha). How much long does it usually take to remove the bed of the truck? (assuming everything comes apart)
You can have the bed off in like 10 minutes. If they don't come loose, just blow them off with a torch. You don't need to do any hardcore offroading to break the frame. Just hit ONE pothole. My first break, was offroading. Landed hard after catching some mad air. Broke the spring mount off. The second, I hit a pothole and snapped it at the dogleg. The 3rd, speedbump and cracked it above the bumpstop. Mind you, after the 2nd break, I replaced that rail from the horse collar, back.
 

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lol i love livin on the west coast. i can have all the bolts off in 20 minutes if im motivated,its only what 6 bolts, 12 nuts? loosen the bottom one that keeps it tight, and take off the main one, and have a friend help me lift it off.

taken the bed off way to many times to count, its a hell of a lot easier workin on the rear end with it off
 

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Interesting all the ones I have patched I had no problems with the areas repaired in other areas sometimes . Then I boxed the entire frame not just where rusted through

Although this new liquid brine they spray on the roads is down right brutal

Yes indeed the road slop gets up in the frame and can`t drain out and lays there right at the spring hanger most often the first place to go.
 

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Discussion Starter #20
Yeah with the bed off I will really get a good idea of all the lousy spots. I love the truck, if someone did not know just looking at the body is mint, but the rear portion of the frame is getting pretty bad so before I slam another pothole and immobilize the truck I need to fix the frame. Does anyone know if you can purchase these spring hangers I could just weld into the new material?
 
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