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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I rebuilt the Toyota axles in the 55 willys and the guy on the youtube video said these calipers were an upgrade...I don’t think they fit right as the rotor is not located in the center... Even tho they bolted right up?
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I just bled the brakes twice yesterday and afterwards have almost no brakes… after looking at some other calipers, it looks like they are not centered on the rotor.
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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Those calipers are for vented rotors, like on ifs trucks. You have solid rotors. You either need to upgrade to vented rotors, or get calipers for a 82-85 axle. You also need your bleeder screws on top of the caliper.
I went back to new stock calipers and can’t get the brakes to bleed fully and get pressure even after a new master cylinder. I’m stumped as it is a pretty simple system and I cant find any leaks anywhere. It will build pressure if I pump them a few times.
 

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Are you sure the problem is trapped air and not something else? Are the rear brakes drum brakes? If so, are they adjusted so the shoes don't have a lot of movement?

You could try an alternate bleeding method (I'm assuming you don't have access to a pressure bleeder or vacuum bleeder). Put a piece of clean tubing on the bleeder fitting and submerge the other end in a container with brake fluid in it. Open the bleeder fitting and slowly push the brake pedal to the floor and slowly release it. Do this a few times. For this to work the threads on the bleeder need to be reasonable air tight.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Are you sure the problem is trapped air and not something else? Are the rear brakes drum brakes? If so, are they adjusted so the shoes don't have a lot of movement?

You could try an alternate bleeding method (I'm assuming you don't have access to a pressure bleeder or vacuum bleeder). Put a piece of clean tubing on the bleeder fitting and submerge the other end in a container with brake fluid in it. Open the bleeder fitting and slowly push the brake pedal to the floor and slowly release it. Do this a few times. For this to work the threads on the bleeder need to be reasonable air tight.
Yes the rear are drums. I’m not sure about adjusting the rears, I’ve never adjusted rear drum brake shoes before.
thanks, That is how i have been bleeding them but without a clear piece of tube. I do have a vacuum bleeder but it is in storage right now as I am in between places right now sadly. I might go grab it tomorrow that way I can fully bleed them myself and don’t have to rely on another body to help.
 

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Don't forget the LSPV. If there's air and/or crud in it, it can cause what you're seeing. I've found that taking the axle end of it's bar off, and moving it up and down through it complete range while bleeding the LSPV helps get the crud and corruption that builds up in the valve out. It really helps. My 87 'Runner's brakes felt almost new the first time I did that. Up till then, I'd been bleeding the valve, but not moving the bar. It really breaks up a lot of crap the builds up.

Good luck!
Pat☺
 
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