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Discussion Starter #1
Can anyone tell me what I am looking at? The last user of this trailer put a bobcat on it & some implements. I think the load flattened this thing. I am hopeful to resurrect this trailer as about a 10K deck over tilt trailer. I appears to me to be a rigid suspension. Could a guy ever be happy with this setup, or should i be looking towards springs & axles? My Carson car trailer rides real nice, but it is just too wimpy, I am ready for a change. Looks like the assembly on the left side is tweaked - any thoughts?

My intended us is for wheelers & misc small equipment. It is important to me to be a deck over and a tilt.









 

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Looks to me like it's just a walking beam with an unsprung center pivot. I've seen worse (triple axle solid mount comes to mind). If what you're hauling has its own suspension, I wouldn't worry about it at all. If you plan on hauling fragile items, you might want to pass in favor of something with a bit more suspension than what you get out of tire squat.
 

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never seen a bogey like that on a dual axle trailer before. Weird because it puts all the weight on that center pivot. Its somewhat (ok not really) similar to some military vehicles i've seen. Different execution though.

I'm not sure its unsprung, that oblong thing the hubs bolt to could hold torsion bars or the rubber flex pieces some of the rubber sprung torsion trailers use. At any rate its certainly unique, and I generally don't like unique things on a trailer. lol.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Thanks for the input. So, is this considered Torsion? - Not like I have seen before.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Ha! Me neither on the unique :)

The lower frame ends just past the pivot point. Extending the frame would not come easy because of the cross member in the deck framing (it barely clears the end of the frame when it is tilted). So.... I am thinking I can put a more standard tandem torsion setup onto it...
 

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I can't quite tell from the pictures, but is that also the point where the deck pivots? That the deck pivots on the crosstube and that the suspension is on the ends of the same crosstube?
 

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Looks like a crazy old cluster fawk. I'd find something more modern. If anything goes wrong, you are either making stuff or adapting something else in. Looks craptastic to me.
Travis..
 

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I can't quite tell from the pictures, but is that also the point where the deck pivots? That the deck pivots on the crosstube and that the suspension is on the ends of the same crosstube?
Looked again and I think you're right. Doubly weird, and that much harder to replace with a more traditional suspension setup.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Yes, it pivots on the cross tube.

So maybe just easier to re-purpose all that steel for a BBQ trailer rather than a tilt trailer with decent suspension?? :)
 

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Put a rig on it and see what happens? Should be able to see movement if it's torsion.

I'd build a subframe under that for some standard 7k torsion axles, and isolate that center pivot to just the tilt function.
 

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The nice thing about that setup is when loading something heavy it would keep the weight to all 4 tires and the trailer tongue would not lift like other trailers.
 

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I've been googling like crazy about this for way too long trying to figure out what that is. IMO there's just too much going on with the beams for it to be a suspension-less setup, they could have just welded axle stubs to any piece of steel if they were going to do it that way. I thought maybe there were Timbren-type springs inside it, although I'm not sure how that'd work. I don't think there's any torsion springs, since there'd be a square tube somewhere, but who knows.

I don't think this is actually a similar concept, but look at the top picture (and bottom paragraph) on this page: Tandem Axle Suspension Designs
 

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I'd leave it alone, run it as is, and eventually craigslist it when you decide you want a normal trailer?
 

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Looks to be just another version of a walking beam setup. I have a 1978 Miller 12 ton tandem dually equipment trailer in my backyard with a setup close to that. I think a lot of trailer manufacturers built their own suspensions back in the day.
 

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How does the "suspension" aspect of it work though? It seems like the "Page suspension" I linked doesn't have any actual suspension, the beam just pivots to keep the wheels flat over non-flat surfaces. I know heavy duty suspension doesn't move MUCH, but I'd think it'd need to move SOME.

Looks to be just another version of a walking beam setup. I have a 1978 Miller 12 ton tandem dually equipment trailer in my backyard with a setup close to that. I think a lot of trailer manufacturers built their own suspensions back in the day.
 

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It looks like it moves just fine. The axles both get vertical travel as they impact a bump and the large rectangle that the hubs bolt to rotates accordingly. The spring effect depends on the other tire remaining on the ground and therefore resisting the movement. It's actually kind of cool to think about. It's not super uncommon on semi trucks, especially older ones. There are videos online for a garden cart that uses a walking beam and there are animations that detail how it works. Used to be on northern tool, that was years ago, but I'm sure it's still out there somewhere. It being the Internet and all.

This is very similar to how a lot of old military trucks rear suspension only they generally used an inverted leaf spring to tie two live axles together.
 

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This is the modern truck suspension called walking beam. It uses a very stiff leaf spring up top.

This is the old style I've only seen on old ass military trucks.


Either way it allows for a ton of flex in off road situations but it doesn't allow for sway, and the walking action makes it handle pretty well over obstacles. That's why it's still used, especially on log trucks and stuff. Check out this old walking beam military truck.

Or, an extreme case:


Pretty cool, right?
 

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The only drawback from what it is I can see is the fact the axles stub into the "beam."
Not having a full axle will let the tires splay out. I'd say it will wear the tires real fast with a load.
 
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