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Discussion Starter #41 (Edited)
It I haven't done a lot of work on the Jeep lately. I have been making some body mounts for the frame and cutting the front fenders to fit around the frame. I have also been fabbing some extensions for the cowl to fender that will bolt in rather than cutting and welding new steel in. I will see how they work when I get them bent.

I started working on rebuilding my Bronco Dana 20 transfer case. I looked a couple of places for disassembly instructions and found some here on Pirate as well as Classic Broncos web site. I have the case mostly disassembled, but I have a question I need some help with. The directions say:


16. Wedge the front output shaft front bearing away from the main drive gear to allow removal of the snap ring from its groove in the shaft. Then, tap the shaft and rear bearing out of the case (Fig. 8).

I can barely even see the snap ring. There is about an 1/8 inch between the bearing and the drive gear. Any ideas on how to get that snap ring out? It is down in there where it is hard to get to. Do I need a special tool to get it stretched enough to get it off?

On the Pirate instructions it says he used a bearing puller with c clamps to hold the bearing in the case and he used a drift to force the shaft through the bearing toward the rear. I am going to pick up a bearing puller tomorrow. I got the rear bearing off with a gear puller. It ruined the bearing but I didn't care since I have ordered a master rebuild kit for the case. Any help or advice is welcome. Thanks
 

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Discussion Starter #42 (Edited)
I haven't had a lot of time to work on the Willys lately. I decided a few weeks ago to put my M715 up for sale. I placed an ad on Craigslist and put a link to it on the M715Zone where I posted my build. Scott, one of the guys I know form the M715Zone said another M715 sold last month at the Mecum auction in Pennsylvania, and it went for $35,000. I looked at the truck on line. It was a frame off restoration with stock running gear with the exception of it had a Ford 360 engine. It looked nice, but nearly as nice as mine. After some thought, I decided to take it to the Dallas, Texas Mecum auction.

I really loved the truck, and it took me six years to get it done (never really done). The problem was I made it so nice and it was so big, I didn't want to tear it up. I know that sounds crazy because I built it to wheel it.

Anyway, they had over 1200 cars for sale. It was like the biggest, nicest car show you have ever been to. The only difference is you could have any of the cars you wanted, well, if you were willing to spend the money.

Long story short is my truck went on the block Thursday evening. It was the 265th car that day. I think it got more lookers than anything else there. It certainly wasn't your typical Mustang, Corvette, Camaro, or street rod. There was nothing else there even close to like it, although there were some nice restored K-10 and K-20's. It didn't sell for $35,000, but it did bring $30k. I was happy with that, although Mecum gets their fair share of the selling price, from both the seller and buyer. If nothing else, it is worth going to see. While we were there, my brother-in-law purchased a 62 numbers matching Corvette. It is red to match his 2015 Corvette Z06. He obviously has more disposable income than I do.

Anyway, I have been doing a little work on the M-38. I completed the front fender extensions. Rather than weld them in, I decided to make the extensions out of 16 ga. steel and bolt them in place. They are the same angle as the fender and they add 6 inches to the length of the engine bay. I am probably getting ahead of myself a little bit, since I have yet to get the drivetrain all together and set in the frame. However, I have taken several measurements and read others' builds and I am confident six inches will be enough. If I have to, it would be fairly easy to make another new set. Obviously, I will wait to extend the hood until I get the drivetrain in and double check everything.

I have the Bronco Dana 20 apart and I just received the master rebuild kit for it so it will be put back together soon. I also received my adapter(s) from Advanced Adapters. Just waiting for a friend to complete the transmission rebuild.

I have also been looking at getting a different (lower) intake for my truck 5.3 Chevy engine. I have been looking at this one from Ebay. Any thoughts? I know I can use an LS1 intake, but they don't flow as well and you lose some low end power. I am open to suggestions.



Here is a picture of my truck parked for the Mecum sale as well as some of the fender extensions on the M38.





 

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Discussion Starter #43
been a long time since I posted. I wish I could say I have a lot more done, but it has been going slow. This fall was full of house projects like tearing out the old sidewalk and pouring a new one, repainting, and refinishing hardwood floors to name a few projects.

I finally got my transfer case rebuilt. I got the master rebuild kit from Wild Horses and I purchased an Advanced Adapters Bronco Dana 20/700R4-4L60E conversion. The transfer case rebuild went slower than I expected. It was my first rebuild.

It is my understanding that the Dana 18 and 20 are very similar. I know many of you have rebuilt the Dana 18. I found separating the front bearing from the front output shaft exceptionally hard to get off the shaft. I used a bearing separator and C clamps as recommended in a Belvista write up. What a pain. And then to tell on myself, I got everything back together and realized I had the shift fork for the sliding gear on backwards, so the front output shaft had to come back out (ruined a new bearing in the process).

I read a lot of information on making the shifters totally independent, and the potential problems with shifting one end into low range while the other end was in high range. I saw where the shift rods could be modified. I also found this video on Youtube:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PgfoN99zc5c

I liked this idea better, so I completely removed the pins between the shifters. I then purchased the adjustable shift detent kit from JB Customs. This allows me to apply more tension on the shifter detent balls so I can make it stay in position better. As for shifters, I am open for ideas. I think I would kike to use cable shifters, but I am not sure.









I have been keeping my eyes open for a good Warn 8274. I found one about an hour from here. The guy I bought it from purchased it new in 1978. He still had the original owners manual. Overall, it is good running condition. He admitted he caught the controller wire in the winch cable, so he made one out of an electrical box and a toggle switch.

I ordered a new controller, roller fairlead, and 150 feet of cable. I thought about going with rope instead of wire, but it will see more mud around here, plus the cost of 150 feet of rope....ouch. I found a shop in Northern California that has genuine Warn roller fairleads for about $50. I guess they sell a lot of winches and upgrade them to rope and hawse fairleads, so they let the rollers go cheap. I had purchased one from them for my M715. Here is the winch.

 

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Discussion Starter #44
Been working on the engine a bit also. I know the truck engine is too tall so I needed to run a lower profile intake and figure out a way to move the alternator lower. I stripped the engine of all of the wiring, front accessory drive, and intake manifold. The engine got a good cleaning and preparing for paint. I pulled the valve covers as well.

I read up about several options for acccessory drives. I had been keeping my eyes open for an F body front accessory mount, but wasn't having much luck. The difference in length between the F body and the truck is about 3/4 inch. The Corvette drive is still a bit shorter, but $$$$. I decided to stay with the truck accessories and looked for optional mounts I ended up getting a kit from ICT Billet. The kit is very clean and simple. I used a Flowkooler high flow water pump for a 2002 Camaro LS1 engine. The ICT Billet kit came with spacers for the Camaro water pump. The spacers used O ring type seals on both sides of the spacer. Here are some photos.






 

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Slow progress is still progress! I'm excited to see this one when it's finished up, I think you're headed in a good direction with it. Are you planning to tear down and rebuild your "new" 8274? Or just going to call it good with the new cable and roller fairlead?
 

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Discussion Starter #46
I haven't decided for sure, but I will probably go ahead and tear the winch down and make sure everything is good. It will give me a chance to thoroughly clean it and repaint while I have it apart.

You are right on the slow progress being progress. The M715 took me about five years to get it together and running. I am hoping the progress will be much quicker on this one. A friend has promised to build a transmission for me, and he has been very slow. I haven't pushed him. I really can't get too far along until I get the engine, transmission, and transfer case bolted together and in the frame to see how everything fits together.

I have also been reading up about wiring harnesses. I know I can modify my truck harness, but it goes across the top of the intake. An LS style harness would make a cleaner install. New ones are expensive so I am not sure what direction I should go. I will probably just modify the truck harness. I am open to suggestions. A lot of this stuff is new to me. I am on a huge learning curve.
 

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Discussion Starter #47
I finally got my 4l60E transmission. Everything is bolted together and is in the frame. I have the transfer case clocked down a bit since I did not know how everything would line up as far as the front drive shaft clearing the transmission pan, etc.

I have the engine about the height I think it needs to be in the front. I think the transmission can come up a couple of inches. I also think I need to clock the transfer case up so it is a little flatter. Right now, the transfer case is 3.5 inches below the frame. The transmission pan is about 2 inches below the frame. It appears the floor will not need to be cut for the transmission. However, I will need to raise a small area to the driver's side for the transfer case. I would like to keep my storage box under the passenger seat if possible.

As for the rear drive shaft, it looks like it will be about 17 - 18 inches long. I am sure I will have to run a double cardan joint at the transfer case.

I also found I could not run the stock truck exhaust manifolds. They are too wide to fit between the frame. I have a couple pair of Camaro LS manifolds. One set is from an LS1 I believe. The other set is off a 6.2 out of a newer Camaro. It looks like the older LS1 style are narrower than the truck and will work. They do exit close to the spring shackle, but I think there is adequate room.

It appears there is about 7.5 inches between the water pump pulley and the rear of the grille shroud (which I plan on trimming down). I think I should have plenty of room to run a radiator and electric fan(s).

Also, the stock truck oil pan seems to hang a bit low. A stock Camaro pan kit from Summit runs about $150, but is only about an inch shorter than the truck (thought it would be more). A Holley oil pan kit for an LS Camaro is 2 inches shorter than the Camaro LS pan, but the kit is about $350.

OK, here are my questions:

Should I keep the tool box under the passenger seat? I know I may have to trim it a bit near the transmission tunnel to clear the transfer case. What other problems might I run into? Seat mounting?

Does the engine look to be positioned well? I still have good firewall clearance, but I want to keep the rear drive shaft as long as possible.

I would like to run a shorter oil pan, but I can't see spending $150 to gain 1 inch. I like the Holley oil pan kit but $$$$. Any other options that you are aware of?

I have read a lot of other threads and learned a great deal. I would still appreciate any comments. I am sure there are things I am not thinking of. Here are some pics:







 

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Discussion Starter #48
I looked at a few exhaust manifold options. A friend gave me some LS7 manifolds that would be cool to use, but no one makes a collector for the odd D shaped outlet. It looks like the only way to make them work is to cut the stock down pipes which include a cat. Those are expensive. I finally decided to simply order some Patriot tight tuck ceramic coated headers. They exit in the middle of the block. I have the shackle reverse bolt and shackle on the inside of the frame near where the rear exit manifolds dump. It looked too close for comfort.

I also ended up ordering a GM Performance oil pan kit for a Corvette. It will end up being about 2.5 inches shorter than the truck oil pan. The kit comes with everything needed to make the change.

I am going to clock the transfer case up flat and raise the transmission up some. I will need to cut the floor for the transmission transfer case adapter plate back. I think the floor from the transfer case adapter forward will have more than enough room?

 

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Discussion Starter #49
I finished up the winch. The only thing left to do is spool on the 150 feet of new cable. I tried to match the color of the newer 8274-50.





 

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Winch looks great! I'm just about finished up with mine. What all did you have to do to it as far as replacement parts go? Also what did you paint it with?
 

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Discussion Starter #51
Thanks. I had a hard time finding a dark grey paint, but ended up with some Rustoleum Universal Metallic Paint and Primer in One (Walmart). The color is called Flat Soft Iron. I used a clear coat over that. That is what I used on the main case. On the spool and motor I used Rustoleum semi gloss black. On the brake drum I used hammered silver.

As for the repairs/replacement. Ends up the guy I bought it from had done some updating before I bought it. I opened up the case top and looked everything over. Everything looked good and the oil looked good. I went ahead and put new oil in it and sealed it back up. Everything seems to work well on it. I will probably regret later not going ahead and putting all new seals and a brake kit now, but I will run it as is for now. It will be some time before I have the Jeep done enough to need it anyway.

Are there any pictures of yours? What have you done to update it?
 

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Discussion Starter #52
Haven't gotten much done on the Jeep lately. I was gone to Mexico last week on a missions trip. It was a great trip and we got a lot of work done.

While in the airport, I did manage to order a radiator for the Jeep. I ordered a 22 x 19 aluminum cross flow radiator with a steam port and cooling for the automatic transmission. I ordered it from Superior Radiator out of Michigan. I ordered it last Monday and received it today. It looks well made and I went ahead and got the shroud and fan from them. The price was reasonable.





I did modify some motor mounts. Since I am running center dump headers, I moved the mounting point forward on the engine a bit. For a mount, I used 1 3/4 DOM I had left from my last roll cage. I bent a piece to go under the front of the oil pan and welded plates on each end that will eventually bolt through the frame. I will use another plate welded to the inside of the frame as well as one on the outside of the frame for additional strength. I used poly mounts from Ruff Stuff to mount to the engine. I still have to gusset the pipe from the motor mount to the underneath cross bar. Everything is simply tacked together for now.





I also raised the transmission/transfer case a couple of inches. It looks like the transfer case will be about 2 inches below the frame at the lowest point. I think that is as high as I want to go. I don't want the rear drive shaft to be too steep. I will need to cut and raise the floor for clearance.


 

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That looks like a stout motor mount setup! Any idea how close that cross member is going to be to the front pumpkin?
 

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Discussion Starter #54
The front of the tube is even with the rear of the front yoke. There is 9 inches clearance between the bottom of the tube and the yoke. The up travel on the suspension will probably be a maximum of 7 inches with a bump stop in place.

I am pretty fortunate to have the front axle stretch forward enough where I wont have any front axle/engine clearance problems.

 

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Discussion Starter #55
I have been plugging away slowly. It seems like it takes me a long time to figure out the way I want to do something and get it done (lot of reading here - thanks for the posts)

I trimmed the shroud off of the grill as many have done to make more room for the radiator. With the drivetrain positioned where it is, I have a little over 1/2 inch between the radiator fan motor and the water pump pulley. The engine is sitting a bit lower than in the photo.



I have been looking at my tire clearance and suspension travel. Currently, there is about 8 inches clearance between the tire and the fender in the front and 8.5 inches in the rear. There is a little over 8 inches clearance between the front spring and the frame with no bump stop. The front springs are the lighter duty Wagoneer springs and the rears are 3.5 inch BDS YJ heavy duty leaf springs. At this point, the only weight on the frame is the tub. The drivetrain is sitting on blocks until I get the mounts finished. Any idea how much the springs should compress under load? I think Defbob used similar springs on his Jeep.

springs.




I clocked the transfer case up as much as the AA clocking ring would let me go. The ring has sections of three adjustment holes together spaced out on the ring. The adapter plate has two adjustment holes together spaced out long the adapter. If I try to go to the net set of holes, it puts the front output shaft up in the floor. I guess the ring could be machined for additional holes, but I think I will stay where it is. At this position, the lowest part of the transfer case hangs about 2 inches below the lower frame rail.

The rear driveshaft is about 16.5 inches long with an angle of about 28 degrees. I spoke to the guys at Tom Woods Driveshafts about my options. He advised they make a 1310 double cardan joint that can operate with as much as a 35 degree angle, but he recommended I bring the angle down a bit. He said that for every inch difference in transfer case/differential height, it would make a difference of about 4 degrees on my rear driveshaft. I would think the rear should settle at least a couple inches with the addition of a cage, seats, fuel tank, spare tire, and all the other stuff that will be added in. He also suggested I run a limiting strap from the differential to the frame to limit droop. He said that would be the best way to still have good articulations and not allow the rear axle to droop enough where the drive shaft would exceed its ability to function.



I am in the process of building the transmission/transfer case cross member. In order to keep the bottom as flat as possible, I don't want to run any type of poly mount pad under the transmission. Instead, I plan to run poly bushings on the ends of the cross member inside the frame rails. There is plenty of clearance on the passenger side, but I have the front driveshaft to contend with on the driver side. I am thinking about running the cross member behind the case with the mount coming forward. I will build a skid plate eventually to cover as much of the bottom as possible. Any thoughts on the best way to build the cross member for best clearance?



 

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Id strongly urge you to carefully revisit the transmission mount idea. MANY people have found over and over that not having a centered rear mount leads to bell housing breakage.

When you mount the trans crossmember bushings wide you allow the transmission bellhousing itself to try to resist the torque and shock loads from the motor verse allowing to the motor to do it as designed by countless auto manufactures.

I'm not saying it cant work, or that many others do not get away with it, but it certainly has bit my ass and countless others.


ill be starting my ls conversion here shortly:homer:


-Shawn
 

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Discussion Starter #57 (Edited)
Supersize, I ended up making a mount made from 1 3/4 .120 wall tube. I welded a tab to the center that mounts under the transfer case/transmission adapter. Here is what I came up with.







Are you recommending there be a poly bushing between the plate and the transmission adapter mount? One other question. When I ran the 203/205 doubler on my M715, I ran an additional torque brace off the passenger side of the 205. I don't see where the factory Bronco Dana 20 setup had anything like that. Is there a need for additional bracing? I will eventually make a skid plate for the belly. Thanks for the input.
 

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Discussion Starter #58
I ordered some seats. I ended up getting the Corbeau low back with adjustable headrests for the front/ I also got the matching 36 inch rear seat for the rear. I want to be able to have my grandkids ride in the Jeep. I want to keep the tank underneath the rear floor. I have thought about raising the section under the seat to get more volume. I have a friend who fabricates and specializes in stainless. He said he would build a custom tank for me.




I definitely need to get trimming on the inner fender wells to make room.

I also got my steering box. It is a rebuild from a 79 Camaro Z-28. It has a little quicker steering ratio - 2.5-3 turns lock to lock. I am running a Wagoneer steering arm. When I set the steering box inside the frame rail with the pitman arm hooked to the drag link, it looked like the rod end was going to possible rub the tie rod. I am running high steer arms. Since I did not want to move the front axle back ( the wheelbase is currently 91 inches ), I decided to box in the inside of the front cross member an inch to allow me to move the steering box forward. I was just getting started when I ran out of welding gas so everything came to a standstill.






I decided to go ahead and pull the drivetrain back out. I need to switch the oil pan with the shorter one I purchased. It will also make it easier to complete some needed welding on the frame, motor mounts, etc.
 

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Yes. Way to many people including myself have learned the hard way. Look at just about every vehicle manufacture and the transmount located the transmission in place, the engine handles most of the torque load.

Your trans mounts, being wide will fight the motor and the bellhousing or adaptor is what will be the looser. Best case is you deal with loose bolts forever, worst case if you ruin transmission housing and a wheeling trip.
 

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Discussion Starter #60
Not doubting what you say, but I was just looking in 4 Wheel and Off Road today, and they had an article about installing a Coyote engine in a older Ford Bronco. They used a very similar mount on the Dana 20 transfer case. Used the same type mounts for the engine so I would think they would flex equally. I will definetly look harder at how I have mounted things.
 
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