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Discussion Starter #81
Thanks Lepp. I have been away from the site for a while so trying to catch up on what I have been working on.

I made a new hood with an additional six inches of length. I drilled out the spot welds on the rear hood support so I could re-use it. I did purchased a new hinge as the old one was in pretty bad shape. I then cut the front couple of inches out of the hood to use for the front. I used some heavy half inch angle iron to connect the front and rear supports at the bottom of the sides of the hood where it meets the fender. I then used a piece of flat bar to connect the front and rear supports down the middle of the hood. I used 18 gauge sheet to cover the hood. I drilled holes in the center, middle, and side supports to "spot" weld the sheet metal down. I began in the middle and began tack welding toward the outside. Once I got the sheet metal coming down the sides, I used heat to try to assist with the bending. I am not sure if it helped, but the hood came out pretty good. I may see if I can make it a little stiffer, but it is every bit as stiff as the stock hood. I used a ratchet strap and small wood blocks to pull the sides in and hold them while I tack welded them. Another set of hands would have helped but.... I should have taken more pictures.




 

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Discussion Starter #82
I still have not set the pinion angle - welded the spring perches, as I am waiting to get the Jeep at running weight first. In order to get it at full weight, I decided to build my spare tire mount, and mount the spare tire. At first, I was going to try to hinge the mount, but anyway I could think of doing it, it was going to either block the tail lights or the tailgate. I still want the tailgate to open. I welded in a receiver hitch which goes through the center of the bumper and ties into the frame, so it should be plenty strong. I wanted the tire to sit close to the body, and I wanted it to hinge out of the way. I decided to make it so it will hinge back toward the rear and down toward the ground.

I started with 2 inch 1/4 wall square tubing. I welded 1/4 inch plates to the sides rising upward. The plates are 5X5. I then drilled a hole through the plate and another square tube which will work as the pivot. Another hole was drilled forward about three inches for a bolt or pin to lock it in place. I then welded and gusseted a vertical support that is about two inches from the tailgate. I then welded and gusseted another piece that will weld to the actual spare tire mount. I ordered it so I don't have it on yet. I went ahead and hung the spare over the support to see how it will sit. I think I want to angle it slightly forward at the top (about the angle of the rear soft top window). Here are some photos.








I finally found a use for the old over sized D rings I kept from the M1028 I purchased a few years ago as a parts truck for my M715 build. Think they are big enough? :D
 

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Discussion Starter #83
Finally got around to making my radiator mounts. I couldn't make up my mind how to mount it securely. I ended up making a bolt in cross member for the frame right behind the steering box. I had to cut a hole for the steering shaft. I used 1.5 X 3 steel tubing and bolted it through the frame rails with 4 bolts per side.

Since I don't have a metal brake, I had a friend make a tray for the bottom of the radiator large enough to fit it inside of rubberized cushioning material. He also made a bracket to hold the top of the radiator. His shop specializes in stainless steel products so he made them out of stainless. I made some supports out of 1.5 square stock, welded them to flanges, and bolted them through the cross member. I wanted them bolted to ease removal. I then plug welded the lower tray to the square stock supports.

For the top, I welded the bracket to a piece of 1 1/4 inch angle iron. I drilled holes through the angle iron for bolts and then welded a nut to the bottom. A bolt runs through the top of the grill to tighten the bracket against the top of the radiator and then there is a jam nut under the grill to lock the bolt in place. Hopefully the pictures show what I did. The radiator feels very secure. I don't think it can move other than the little give that is in the rubber material. The rubberized material I used is a white rubberized roofing material that has a very strong adhesive on the under side.

Lower tray


Upper bracket


Upper bracket mounted


Lower tray mounted




The electric fan is 3/4 inch from the engine pulley. The radiator is slightly offset to the passenger side so there is actually more room.
 

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I like the vents :)

I think I have some of those D rings as well, my neighbor back home in Louisiana has given me a few he's found in the field (he's a field engineer for the army), some of those D rings are BEEF. Mine have a metal chain attaching a security cotter pin on the end of the main pin, so you can't loose it. Some of them are so big, I'd be worried someone might steal it for it's scrap value, haha
 

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Discussion Starter #85
Yeah, some of mine have the chain which is attached to the pin. They are super heavy duty. They are probably stronger than my pass through welded tow points.
 

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Discussion Starter #87 (Edited)
I have been looking at gauge packages for a while and I am still a undecided, but I have been looking at different speedometer options. I was looking at boat gauge kits since many are waterproof. When I was looking at the GPS speedometers, this one came up on Amazon. They say it is waterproof, has an odometer and a clock, is backlit, and has few other options. It also has a built in GPS antenna. Has anyone used one of these before or have any thoughts?

https://www.amazon.com/Backlight-Speedometer-Waterproof-Motorcycle-Automobile/dp/B01M1JUMY1/ref=pd_sbs_468_t_2?_encoding=UTF8&psc=1&refRID=3CRBBFV6DHH5CSY04AR4
 

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Your hood looks great! Your procedure is pretty much what I was thinking as I'm getting ready to build a new hood...
 

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I have been looking at gauge packages for a while and I am still a undecided, but I have been looking at different speedometer options. I was looking at boat gauge kits since many are waterproof. When I was looking at the GPS speedometers, this one came up on Amazon. They say it is waterproof, has an odometer and a clock, is backlit, and has few other options. It also has a built in GPS antenna. Has anyone used one of these before or have any thoughts?

https://www.amazon.com/Backlight-Speedometer-Waterproof-Motorcycle-Automobile/dp/B01M1JUMY1/ref=pd_sbs_468_t_2?_encoding=UTF8&psc=1&refRID=3CRBBFV6DHH5CSY04AR4
Amazon has a great return policy if the product sucks, just buy it closer to when it actually works

Sent from my SM-G920V using Tapatalk
 

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Discussion Starter #90
Thanks for the compliments on the hood. I got the idea from Defbob's build. I think it turned out pretty good. I did use ratchet straps to pull the sides in as I welded them to the frame work. I used a lot of spot welds and kept bending in and tightening the straps. It works best if you put the strap all of the way around the hood and cinch it tighter as you go. I also used some heat on the sheet metal, but I am not sure it helped or not. I don't have a torch so I simply used a bottle torch like you use for sweating pipes.

I have another question regarding frame mounting the roll cage. I am using Ruff Stuff tabs and bushing kits to mount the frame. I welded the tabs to the underneath of the floor roll cage plate. I am using .120 wall DOM to attach to the frame. I made 1/4 inch plates to weld the DOM to. I figured I would weld the plate to the frame for additional strength rather that simply welding the DOM to the frame itself.

As I think about having six similar mounts, it seems to me it may get very difficult lining everything up perfectly when it is time to put it all back together. Should I bolt the plates to the frame rather that weld it? If I bolted it, I would put another piece of plate on the opposite side of the frame. Here is what it looks like so far.


 

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Discussion Starter #91 (Edited)
Que Honda. That is a good idea on waiting on the purchase. I will probably run a tach where the speedometer goes, but I still want some sort of speedometer. I was looking at boat gauges when that one popped up.

I have been purchasing parts I will been using even though I won't really need them until final assembly. I am trying to pre-fit everything, then once it is done, I will take it all back apart, finish all the welds that have simply been tacked, then begin painting and re-assembly. As for the speedometer, as long as I know the hole size, I can go ahead and cut it in the dash. Thanks for the ideas.
 

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On the cage frame mounts, I would weld it. You will have the ability to have some adjustability with the body side holes.

As for the gauge, you could buy it now. Add temporary harness and put it in your DD, and check it's function and speed accuracy. If it's no good now, it won't be better later.
 

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all of those type of frame mounts I've seen have been welded on.

Bolt on probably wouldn't be an outright bad thing I guess
 

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Discussion Starter #94
Thanks for the thoughts on welding vs. bolting on cage mounts. I am going to weld them on. I am sure it will be stronger.

For front shock towers, I am using Ford F-250 pieces. I used them on the M715 and really liked them. I tacked them in place and then measured for how much travel I needed. I ordered Bilstein 5100/5125 shocks. I have not made rear shock mounts yet but they will be mounted behind the axle and at a rearward angle on the upside. I initially thought about using the F250 mounts for the rear also, but the underneath of the body is a bit wider than the frame. I think if I modified the mounts to fit outside the inner fender, it may put the top of the shock too close to the top of the tire under compression and twisting the axle (the other side decompressed). Here is the front test fit.




I finished the spare tire mount. I had ordered a plate pre-drilled for a 6 on 5.5 bolt pattern. It was built of 1/4 inch plate and when I compared it to a leftover 8 lug one I had from Ruff Stuff (3/8 inch), I decided to re-drill some holes to fit the 6 on 5.5 and I used it. It is so much heavier made. I gusseted it up and it is very solid. I may add an additional wheel stud yet. There is very little, but some play in the hitch where it mounts. I think I may drill a hole in the bottom of the receiver, weld in a threaded bung, and use a bolt with a jam nut to remove any wiggle.


 

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I like that spare tire carrier, the possibilities are endless.
Skip
 

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Discussion Starter #96
thanks Skip. I really thought I would make a swing gate for the back, but I couldn't figure out how to do it without blocking the tailgate or the tail lights. I can still hinge it down if I need access to the back or I can remove it by pulling a pin. It is pretty simple, but should work well.
 

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Discussion Starter #97
I made some frames to mount my seats. I need the seats as low as possible without cutting into the rear floor. The rear seat tabs sitting on the rear floor are perfect height. I made a cross member for the front of the seats out of 1 1/4 square tube that connects across the floor from one side of the roll cage to the other. I welded tabs on the front crossbar. For the rear, the tabs bolt through the seat mounts and then bolt flat to the floor. It seems very sturdy. At current height, I have about 4 inches head clearance.

I also made a mount for the Winters Sidewinder shifter. I sat in the seat and placed the shifter within easy reach. I made the mount so it bolts to the seat cross member. I really like where it is positioned, but I feel like it should look more built in. I thought about trying to incorporate it into some type of center console, but there is not much room between the seats.





 

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Discussion Starter #98
Got a little work done today. When I built the cross member for the seats for the roll cage, I welded it in solid. I did make an access panel in the top of the transmission cover, but I also made it so it will come out in one piece. In order to remove it the seat cross member must be removable. I cut the square tube near the outside, and then made it so it could be unbolted fairly simply. Here is what it looks like.




I also got a good start on connecting the roll cage to the frame. I used the tie ins to support the sliders that run at the lower edge of the body.




 

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Discussion Starter #99
I was going through some old pictures the other day and found these of my first Willys build. As you can tell by looking, it was no where near a real off roader. It had a 327 Chevy, TH400, and D-18. The interior was more like a street rod, with front buckets, a middle/rear seat from a van that could be removed, and side folding rear seats from a late 70's Ford extended cab truck. I had to have room for my four sons to ride. It had A/C and tilt wheel.

I sold it in 2001 for $14,500. I found it for sale in South Carolina this past year for $33,000. The only thing that had been changed was the axles had been upgraded. Would like to have it back. Another one of those should have kept vehicles.

How do you like those late 80's directional wheels. I thought those were so cool way back then. :shaking:


 

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Discussion Starter #100 (Edited)
I had made a transmission tunnel out of 14 gauge and butt welded the pieces together. I made an access panel on top and also made it so it could be completely removed. It had a lot of angles and once I welded all the seams, it really didn't set completely flat with the floor. So, I decided to make a newer and simpler one. I made this one from 18 gauge which was much easier to work with. I did use some of the old one where it meets the floor and firewall. My goal is to use as many of the factory weld on nuts to bolt it down. Since I went with a driver's side drop transfer case, I had to cut the floor a bit more on the driver side and I was able to close up the passenger side a bit. I don't have a metal break, so I used my 2x4 metal break, flat nose vice grips, a hammer and dollie to make my bends. Here is the old one.



Here is my make shift metal break.



Here are a couple pictures of the new transmission tunnel.




I have been talking to the guys at Tom Wood's Drive Shafts about building new shafts for me. I decided I wanted to replace the old 10 spline output shaft on my early Bronco Dana 20 transfer case to a 28 spline. The kit adds about an inch to the length of the case, so I wanted to have it installed before I make my final measurements for the rear drive shaft. Here is the new output shaft and housing. It is a simple install that can be done without removing the entire transfer case.

 
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