Pirate 4x4 banner

1 - 14 of 14 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
244 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I'm thinking of using Unistrut tube as my top shock mount in the rear so that as I dial in my rear suspension it'll be infinetly adjustable. Do you think unistrut is strong enough? I took a look at it this weekend and it looked to be about 1/8".


Milan
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
12,996 Posts
<font color="yellow">
1/8" for a shock mount? No. I woulnd't even fell comfortable using flat stock that thick.

What about a piece of 5/16" all-thread rod from Home Depot or something?</font>
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
244 Posts
Discussion Starter #3
Originally posted by MasterYota:
<STRONG><font color="yellow">
1/8" for a shock mount? No. I woulnd't even fell comfortable using flat stock that thick.

What about a piece of 5/16" all-thread rod from Home Depot or something?</font></STRONG>

I've never heard of that, what department is it in? I'll try to find it.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
5,991 Posts
You know, I just wouldn't trust it. I make it a rule to not cut corners when it comes to suspension components. Make sure your shock mounts are plenty strong (3/16 or 1/4" tube works great <IMG SRC="smilies/smile.gif" border="0">). Your shocks take quite a beating.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
25,132 Posts
If you get the 1 5/8" Unistrut (it has a nearly square cross section) it should be PLENTY strong. I thought it had a working strength in the 1000s of pounds range.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
25,132 Posts
Originally posted by Pazuzu:
<STRONG>If you get the 1 5/8" Unistrut (it has a nearly square cross section) it should be PLENTY strong. I thought it had a working strength in the 1000s of pounds range.</STRONG>
Wait, I just reread your post. What are you trying to use? I'm assuming you want to run a 4 foot length of Unistrut between the frame rails, then mount the (tilted) shocks to that. Are you talking about some kind of Unistrut rod as the actual mount itself?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,383 Posts
I personally wouldn't use it, and I use Unistrut all the time for HVAC and piping work. I'd use a minimum of 3/16" thick material to span the framerails, 1/4" is even better. If you have a local 4x shop, stop in a pick up some studs for shocks. They usually have a drawer full of them left over from customers that didn't need them. Usually they'll give you them free or throw them in with the shocks. I picked up 4 of them for free when I bought my Procomp shocks. If you drill a hole into the frame spanning tube, you can drop the shock stud right in and weld it together. It works pretty slick and isn't hard to do.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
244 Posts
Discussion Starter #9
Originally posted by Pazuzu:
<STRONG>Wait, I just reread your post. What are you trying to use? I'm assuming you want to run a 4 foot length of Unistrut between the frame rails, then mount the (tilted) shocks to that. Are you talking about some kind of Unistrut rod as the actual mount itself?</STRONG>

That is actually what I was thinking of using because it has all those nicely pre-pressed holes that would make changing the mounting position pretty easy. I'm kind of reconsidering now though. Unistrut would have been really nice because I kind of have a limited selection of tools and would have simplified tuning my suspension.

Milan
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
244 Posts
Discussion Starter #10
Originally posted by David Otto Fritzsche AKA OOPS:
<STRONG>Pardon my ignorance, but what is unistrut tube???</STRONG>
Unistrut is square cross-section metal tube with pre-pressed oval holes on two opposite sides and one side open with rolled edges. It's used to hang air conditioning equipment, lights, etc. But I guess all of those things are static force as opposed to the dynamic force of cycling shocks.

Milan
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,501 Posts
Originally posted by Pazuzu:
<STRONG>If you get the 1 5/8" Unistrut (it has a nearly square cross section) it should be PLENTY strong. I thought it had a working strength in the 1000s of pounds range.</STRONG>
I would agree that the 1 3/4 square (with no holes) is pretty strong. Maybe not strong enough for a shock mount, but for lots of other stuff. The pic is my 'temporary' flat bed. Held up very well in the wreck. Also made a rack for my hi-lift and C-O2. I love the stuff!

<IMG width=532 height=317 SRC="http://www.pirate4x4.com/ubb/uploads/unistrut.jpg">
 

·
Wicked Raciest !
Joined
·
17,738 Posts
Originally posted by FattyCBR:
<STRONG>Unistrut is square cross-section metal tube with pre-pressed oval holes on two opposite sides and one side open with rolled edges. It's used to hang air conditioning equipment, lights, etc. But I guess all of those things are static force as opposed to the dynamic force of cycling shocks.

Milan</STRONG>
Thanks I know what it is now and no I would not use it, I do not think that it would be strong and I know that it is not the best grade steel out there. Better then rebar but not as good as cold rolled steel. That is my opinion.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8,474 Posts
Why not use both take a piece of Uni-strut with a piece of steel for support. You now have the strength of steel with the adjustment of Uni-strut. <IMG SRC="smilies/jester.gif" border="0">
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
9,402 Posts
I used a piece of 2 X 2 X 3/16 angle with holes drilled in it and It bent just driveing on the Street!! and not I didn't bottom out the shocks. To fix it I bent it back and then added a piece of 2x2 X 1/8" wall square tubing under it. Hasn't bent since. I would of just taken it off and started from scratch except that I have a 4runner and don't have the luxury of removing the bed to grind the welds off. If I was to do it again the smallest piece I would use is 2x2 3/16 square tubing and nothing smaller!!

[ 09-17-2001: Message edited by: 4RnrRick ]
 
1 - 14 of 14 Posts
Top