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Discussion Starter #1
There's a chance I might be aquiring a bike as part of a deal.
First decent (non-box store) bike I'll have had.
What should I be looking for?
As far as I can tell, the bike is an Intense brand 6.6 Slopestyle. Guy told me it needs new tires, and a rear sprocket.
I'll see if I can post a pic from his ad.
 

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Like pants, bikes come in sizes, so getting the right size is a big deal.

Mt. Bikes are designed for different types of riding. I didn't look it up but I'm guessing the "slope style" is a free ride or downhill bike which is fine if you get a lift or shuttle to each hilltop. If you're a flat lander or climb your own hills, look for an Xc or all mountain category bike.
 

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Like pants, bikes come in sizes, so getting the right size is a big deal.

Mt. Bikes are designed for different types of riding. I didn't look it up but I'm guessing the "slope style" is a free ride or downhill bike which is fine if you get a lift or shuttle to each hilltop. If you're a flat lander or climb your own hills, look for an Xc or all mountain category bike.
Slopestyle is probably just a marketing gimmick/ model name. It may or may not be.

I'm re-entering biking (prefacing this post with that since things have changed ALOT) land but when I think of "slopestyle" I think of dual slalom or 4X/ 4 cross type bike. They used to use hardtails and short travel full suspension rigs for that discipline, which would probably also make for an OK general purpose trail bike.

What wouldn't make for a good general purpose bike is if it is more of a downhill bike (heavy, limited gearing, HUGE suspension travel, etc...)
 

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things to look out for would be to make sure wheels are true, spokes are tight, hubs are smooth and no play, make sure there is no play in the suspension pivots. shift into the large chain ring and pull on the chain if you can see a whole tooth the chain is shot and it will need chain and cassette. check headset and bottom bracket for play. because the bikes old most likely the fork is half blown but make sure the suspension feels smooth and the rebound is working smoothly. good luck! the bike is not worth a hole lot it might sound crazy but it is probably worth $300 at most. my buddys 2010 scott gambler ($7000 new) he barley got $1500 for it, used bikes are cheap.
 

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just realized too on what level bike it is i see they came in a few levels. the model with the manitou fork is probably worth 300 like i mentioned but if its the decked out one with the fox suspension it may be worth double if its in really good condition
 

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things to look out for would be to make sure wheels are true, spokes are tight, hubs are smooth and no play, make sure there is no play in the suspension pivots. shift into the large chain ring and pull on the chain if you can see a whole tooth the chain is shot and it will need chain and cassette. check headset and bottom bracket for play. because the bikes old most likely the fork is half blown but make sure the suspension feels smooth and the rebound is working smoothly. good luck! the bike is not worth a hole lot it might sound crazy but it is probably worth $300 at most. my buddys 2010 scott gambler ($7000 new) he barley got $1500 for it, used bikes are cheap.
+1. And if it looks clean and fresh (maintained), then you're stoked. I've not tried the chain stretch trick, but drivetrain wear is a bitch and gets expensive. If you've only ever had Huffys, though, even a dog of a quality bike will be super fun.
 

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Nowadays I would say look for anything that doesn't have wire bead tires and has at least a 10 speed cassette in the back. That will make it less than 10 years old and pretty well guarantee it doesn't have bottom end parts on it.

Wheels bigger than 26", a seatpost size larger than 27.2mm, handlebars that are larger than 25.4mm in diameter and shimano brand hydraulic disc brakes are markers of a bike that are "good" from a 10ft look.

And size! Too large of a bike is a horrible thing to ride. One size too small, maybe...
 

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And skip cheap suspension too. It's not worth it. You are better of riding rigid.

Any front fork that looks like it has chrome plated stanchions is not worth riding and will be very heavy.
 

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used bikes are a great choice to get a nicer bike for less money... size is critical... then geometry is second which goes towards the correct size.

i always inspect the frame for damage and stress cracks or abuse... can never be too cautious especially when buying used carbon frames.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
Still on the prowl. Wandered away for awhile and back again. Got some pointers to look for when looking at bikes (IE things like threadless stems, derailleur hangers, not riveted sprocket setups on the crank)
Basically how to tell a decent bike from an off the rack big box store special.

Still on the hunt.
 

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Stolen? Look inside seat tube for original owners name, inspect serial number on bottom bracket for being altered or scratched off.
 

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Just bought a new-used bike myself. Rode a 2005 Cannondale Moto 5 for 4-5 years now, but it started needing a bunch of parts and decided it was time to upgrade.

use bike - 2015 Giant Trance. Guy replaced virtually everything on the damn bike within the last year. Front fork & rear shock combo were $800 retail easy, paid $1500 for the bike. I'd watch for one like that - someone upgraded it a bunch, but now wants something newer.

I will say, the bikes are similar in their intended use. The ride difference is night and day. Geometry has changed a ton in those 10 years - I feel like i've gotten to be a better rider on the new bike, simply by being on the new bike with newer geometry. I'd definitely recommend looking 2010+ if you can find something in your range
 

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Geometry has changed a ton in those 10 years - I feel like i've gotten to be a better rider on the new bike, simply by being on the new bike with newer geometry. I'd definitely recommend looking 2010+ if you can find something in your range

Geometry has changed a bunch just in the last couple years.

If you are looking at a used full suspension bike, I'd say don't get anything more than a year or two old (yes, there are exceptions).
 

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Since 1989 I had the same 24 speed Bianchi Grizzly. The past decade or so I would look at new bikes every few years but never saw the need to upgrade. I finally bought a 2019 29r at Christmas and couldn't believe the difference. Got my bike for 1100, now it is up to 1650. A guy at work tried to sell me a 10 or 15 year old full suspension bike that went for 3400 when new. He brought it in to work and I rode it. He wanted 1800 for it. I tried to keep from laughing, it was much better than my 1989 but a joke compared to my 2019.

Before you spend more than a couple of hundred on something used compare it to a new bike.
 

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Before you spend more than a couple of hundred on something used compare it to a new bike.
good point too. there's definitely some capable bikes out there in the $1-2k range brand new.


Hell, there's people out there riding that $300 Dicks bike 30 miles a day year round. We're lucky to have it as a hobby
 

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If you can find them, Demo bikes can be a hell of a deal.

I've picked up two full-squish carbon fiber high end bikes over the last year from demo fleets, both in fantastic condition and got each of them for thousands off the new price.
 
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