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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I've got my eye on a 30 foot tandem flatbed trailer that formerly was a Fleetwood travel trailer. I'm looking to haul my full-size Bronco which was weighed in at 6500 lbs. Does anyone have any experience using one of these trailers for this purpose? I'm going to be shortening the trailer to 22 feet by moving the rear axle to the front leaving the front axle where it is and chopping off 8 feet from the rear. Any pointers on doing something like this?

Thanks


 

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The measurement that I was told by a trailer mfg. was that the center of the axle(s) should be placed 2/3 of the distance from the coupler towards the back (1/3 of the total distance is behind the axle(s), 2/3 in front). Seems to work right for me.

Strength wise, those trailers are made from some pretty wimpy channel. Be careful.

Crowdog
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Yep, that's pretty close to how I was figuring it, a 60/40 axle location. The way I was planning on having it would be three feet between axle centerlines, 12 feet of bed in front of the front axle, 7 feet of bed behind the rear axle.

Thanks for the heads-up about the channel strength.

Anyone have any pics of the framework for a travel trailer? The trailer is 3 hours from me so I'd like a general idea of what to expect before I buy it.

Thanks
 

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It had better be CHEAP.

Keep in mind that the travel trailer had substantial boxing in its superstructure. Without that, I'd expect the pictured trailer to flex like a wet noodle, in torsion (like when one wheel hits a big bump) and worse yet, longitudinally (flexing accross the fulcrum of the axles).

I'd almost bet the flatbed would turn into a beavertail when you drive up on it. <IMG SRC="smilies/frown.gif" border="0">

Be careful.

Randii
 

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most travel trailer frames are to weak to handle a load that heavy and the axles are probaly 2,000-2,5000 pounds each so that a 4-5,000 pound trailer tops. if you are looking for a trailer buy a used one from your local rental center. try wwww.unitedrentals.com
<IMG SRC="smilies/fj.gif" border="0">
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Ok, got some more info from the guy selling it. It formerly was an 1987 33 foot Fleetwood Prowler trailer. I looked up the specs for the current Prowler trailers online and here are the ratings-

GVWR (Gross Vehicle Weight Rating) (lbs.) 9,400

Gross Dry Weight (lbs.) 6,362

Maximum Carrying Capacity (lbs.) 3,038

Hitch Dry Weight (lbs.) 973


I certainly appreciate all the comments posted above- anyone else have any experience?

[ 10-30-2001: Message edited by: Dustball ]
 

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Listen to Randii. the walls and ceiling make up most of the strength in the trailer. When you look at some trailers, you see a railing that runs around the front and sides that come up about a foot. that is that manufactures way of dealing with the strength issue without doing it the right way and adding more structure and weight to the trailer. If you were to build a railing around the front and sides of your trailer you may get away with a little bit. You may even be dollars and headaches ahead if you just rob the axles off of the thing and use them in a new platform. After all, that's all someone would be able to use on that trailer as it sits. For as big as the thing is, it's not like a guy could load a couple ton of hay on the thing and make it down the road. Modifications will have to be made to carry any kind of load.

Make sure you get it inspected after you do mods to it, and call ahead to the state patrol or whomever does inspections around there to find out what you need to do to make the trailer legal.
 

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I made my Jeep trailer out of a salvaged travel trailer frame and ended up using the original 4" channel as crossmembers and buying new 5" channel for the perimeter of the frame. It's a 16' bed and shows no sign of flex when loading the Jeep or a Scout on it.

One note, in order to get 76" between the fenders so I could fit my 74" Jeep thru, I had to widen the axles by about 8 inches or so. A fullsize with any kind of wide tires will not fit. You might check that out before you buy it.

For the amount of time and money it was to make a nice trailer out of the frame I salvaged, I should have just bought one.

My .02
 
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