Pirate 4x4 banner

1 - 5 of 5 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
458 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I have a 07 FJ with a warn front bumper and a winch on it, and i took to the repair shop (for the fender to be replaced some jackass kicked my fender) and they call me an told me that the inner fender apron had a crack in it and it was on both sides and they could not fix my rig. So I asked them how do you think that happened?? They said it was probably from the added weight from the front bumper and they winch. Has anybody had this problem??

P.S. I do beat on my FJ so its not a mall crawler. I have also used the winch as well (to pull myself and other rigs out as well)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
412 Posts
First of all the warn bumper is really really heavy especially with a winch installed not to mention the aproach angle is not very good. I used to have one on Mad Dog. THis could deffinatly be part of the problem but the inner fender bulging, buckeling cracking this is happening to alot of FJ's even with stock bumpers from hard impact on the front end.THis could be from jumping ect. If you take the outer fender off there is a chanel behind the top edge of the inner fender exactly where it bends or cracks. I tack welded a piece of 1x1 tubing from front to back in there and it corrected the weakness. I am going to be dismantling the front of mine soon and will try to post some pics.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,196 Posts
It's not so much from any single impact, but rather from cyclic loading. This problem isn't even exclusive to the FJ Cruiser, since it's been a known problem for other Landcruisers before, outside the US (not all Landcruisers are available in America).

If you look at the FJ Cruiser from the side, you'll see that the cab section of the body from the windshield back is very tall. However, at the point where the body becomes the front wheel well, the vertical height of body metal is only the height of the apron. That's the exact spot this problem occurs.

This is why the body tends to concentrate flexion there, just like your shoe flexes at the ball of your foot.

This has been noticed by people with everything from a completely stock vehicle to people who have fairly modified suspensions. It seems to have been more associated with people who tend to use their FJ Cruisers off road, but sampling has been much less than scientific. It would make SENSE that anyone heavily loading and unloading the front springs of their suspension a lot is going to get more frame flex, and therefore more body flex... but nobody has bothered to study this with any degree of accuracy that I'm aware of.

I consider this to be "no big deal" but a lot of folks have gotten pretty up in arms about it.

My suggestion is just to weld it back together and reinforce it.

The people who don't like that idea think that the "crumple zone" effect will be compromised, risking a crash safety problem.

My response to THAT is simply that the real "crumple zones" of interest involve the frame and engine mounts. If a front end impact needs to bend that body metal, then the engine is already being pushed out of the way. A wimpy little reinforcement on 20 gauge body paneling isn't going to do shit to stop a force that's moving the engine out of the way.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
458 Posts
Discussion Starter #5
thanks for the input guys. I just got off the phone with my insurance company and they said it will be fixed.
 
1 - 5 of 5 Posts
Top