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He was working under a vehicle or large piece of heavy equipment and it fell on him. Notice there is no blood spray and only a small pool of blood. It also cleanly severed the top of his skull and broke it open. There is no fragments in him so whatever hit him was not some explozive fragmented projectile. It was a large object like a steel beam or something. This also explains the small pool of blood and no spray. It was like something fell on him at close range. This is my guess.
 

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The mask is pushing it. An explosion there would be burn marks.

Now a shotgun maybe. But who honestly shoots themselves right there? On the side of a truck? If it was murder, who put the gun there? And it would split the head, not "Take the top off."

Kinda hard to explain this one. But a air tank it hard pressed. Maybe a propane tank, and spark when it blew, but he'd still be burnt.
 

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78bronco460 said:
If you're re-filling bottles you should get trained to check them for a current hydro test stamp and pressure rating. When I get my scuba tanks filled they check the stamps. I notice after a 3300# fill they are almost too hot to touch.

Your tank is being filled to fast. Is it filled off a compressor or a cascade system? The tanks should be put into a protective barrier while refilling.
 

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cj5 kid said:
There is a good chance that poor guy never saw it coming. That is probably the only thing good to come out of this. As far as compressed air is concerned it is extremly dangerous, be it in a tire, or a corroded tank. A couple of years ago a guy two blocks away from my house had his compressor tank blow up. Turns out he was using an old hotwater tank as the pressure vessel. He had been using this "tank" for a couple of years, and had been warned not to use it. When it let go, the roof of his garage was literally lifted off and landed in the neighbors yard. His garage door landed about 85 feet away across the street. He was shielded by the blast from the car he was working on but suffered many injuries, (cuts, broken bones etc...), He died a few days later.
Either he was trying to compress natural gas into that tank or it's complete BS. Well maybe not if he was living in a cardboard box.

In addition, I worked in a shop that used large diameter (3") PVC as a distribution system. It blew large chunks around the shop once a year or so. I could not get the management to change the system to something more substantial. Eventually I left the company... One man has impaired hearing from being next to the line when it blew. Another has permanent scars on his body from the chunks. Several others were hit, and/or frightened severely while operating powered wood-working tools. The accidents were already major, but they could have been deadly.
Seriously, was it a requirement to be mentally handicapped to work at this place? Besides the fact that OSHA would shut this place down in a heartbeat just for the PVC, not to mention the accidents due to that...not one worker sued the hell out of them?
 

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Slowzuki said:
But again - no mention of how many psi were involved.

You know - discovery channel is looking for spoof shows... I think this is a mythbusters in the making. All that's needed is one cargo container (contain potential explosion) and 4-5 air tanks, and an air compressor capable of 1,000psi or better.
 

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Todd W said:
Busted at seems... I see no jagged edges or gaps where shrapnel went flying. Sure it'd suck to have that happen with ur head next to it still ;)
Imagine the dimwit it would take to have that scenario happen. Air compressor is just running and running, way past pressure limit...air tank starts creaking and groaning so guy walks over to it and puts his ear next to it to listen....
 

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78bronco460 said:
If you're re-filling bottles you should get trained to check them for a current hydro test stamp and pressure rating. When I get my scuba tanks filled they check the stamps. I notice after a 3300# fill they are almost too hot to touch.
They are hot to the touch because people fill them too fast. You are only suppose to fill at the rate of 300#/minute. Most SCUBA shops fill faster. Once the cylinder cools, you will lose pressure, which means your tank is not truely full. Unfortunately, most shops will overcome this by "hot filling". This means that if a tank is rated at 3000#, they will fill it to 3200-3400, and then let it cool to read the desired 3000#'s. This is obvoiusly dangerous but happens all the time.

On a side note, my instructor for my Dive Rescue 1 cert has seen the results of a SCUBA tank exploding during a fill. He has been diving for almost 30 years. It took place in Florida and killed the guy. The dive shop workers legs were completely blown off when my instructor reached him after the explosion.
 

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I do know of someone (friend of my dad's) who was killed while working on his antique truck. He was messing with the tires and it had split rims. One of the rings broke and shot up hit him in the head. He was dead before the Resque Squad could get there. It also took a large chunk out of his head.

Really was a sad thing he had just retiered. He had been a mechanic for 40 years.

You just don't know when your time is up.
 

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Dusty Booger said:
They are hot to the touch because people fill them too fast. You are only suppose to fill at the rate of 300#/minute. Most SCUBA shops fill faster. Once the cylinder cools, you will lose pressure, which means your tank is not truely full. Unfortunately, most shops will overcome this by "hot filling". This means that if a tank is rated at 3000#, they will fill it to 3200-3400, and then let it cool to read the desired 3000#'s. This is obvoiusly dangerous but happens all the time.
all of our scba bottles are hydro'd. some stations have the fancy cascades with a sealed chamber surrounds in 1/4 to 3/8 steel to enclose the bottle, my station has a hose and a tank of water to "keep the bottles cool" most of the time we dont even use the water, its just more work to dry em off... on the 300# a minute thing, that never happens either, to fill 15 bottles, 2 at a time from nothing to 4500 #'s would take forever...i know it safer, but it just doesn't happen...
 

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ZJSAMPLE said:
Your tank is being filled to fast. Is it filled off a compressor or a cascade system? The tanks should be put into a protective barrier while refilling.
Yes, they fill them from a large set of cascaded HP tanks. This guy is who I bought the tanks new from, and does my VIP and hydro inspections. If he pops em it's all on him. He says he can hot fill them because they are ++ steel (90cuft) tanks. I usually drop them off to get filled a few days before a trip, and they're cool and full when I pick them up.
 

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78bronco460 said:
Yes, they fill them from a large set of cascaded HP tanks. This guy is who I bought the tanks new from, and does my VIP and hydro inspections. If he pops em it's all on him. He says he can hot fill them because they are ++ steel (90cuft) tanks. I usually drop them off to get filled a few days before a trip, and they're cool and full when I pick them up.
If the steel tank has a + after the pressure rating, it means that you can fill the bottle to 10% above the listed rating. For example, a 3000 + rated tank can be filled to 3300. However, after its 1st hydro, you are no longer supposed to go the 10% above rated PSI.
 

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thanks man, Now im never going to use mine, :( I drain my all the time. And alot of water is in there. Is that good ????????
 

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not saying yes or not to the photos....but i did work at a service station a long time ago, the owner had a bad arm due to a tire "blowing up".

just the force of a sudden lose of psi could have riped the guy apart.

but i do question the photos...why not show the tank?? "need input"

for more info on air psi riping apart something, go talk to your local fire ex shop that does hyrdo testing.

air psi ripes apart the tank, liquid psi does not.
 

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Fellow was hit by a piece of it. I also know of a fellow hit by a coroded freon tank filled to 80 psi.

Why people insist on pretending tanks can never fail is beyond me. Its the reason pressure vessel codes exist. Old propane tanks fail hydrostatic and they don't even really rust on the inside.

Generally tanks fail at seams because corrossion occurs quicker in the heat affected zone of the weld.

Todd W said:
Busted at seems... I see no jagged edges or gaps where shrapnel went flying. Sure it'd suck to have that happen with ur head next to it still ;)
 

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Does anyone know if straight up calculations have any meaning on a compressor?

pi*r^2 at 175psi on a 2ft diameter tank means that over 79000 lbs of pressure are on the top of the tank. Now that pressure is going to be gone almost instantly after you have a 2x1" hole in the tank, but the initial velocity given to the top of the tank or whatever part peels up is going to be substantial.

So I can see the top peeling off and flipping over and the compressor itself demolishing the guy's head.

I can't see fragmentation from those pressure, maybe one triangle of a 3-part weld seam, but certainly no 'shrapnel.'
 

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I am sure it wasnt a small air compressor. I too have seen carnage from a diesel air compressor and a kid who was putting 16" tires on a 16.5 rim.
 

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rusted said:
Does anyone know if straight up calculations have any meaning on a compressor?

pi*r^2 at 175psi on a 2ft diameter tank means that over 79000 lbs of pressure are on the top of the tank. Now that pressure is going to be gone almost instantly after you have a 2x1" hole in the tank, but the initial velocity given to the top of the tank or whatever part peels up is going to be substantial.

So I can see the top peeling off and flipping over and the compressor itself demolishing the guy's head.

I can't see fragmentation from those pressure, maybe one triangle of a 3-part weld seam, but certainly no 'shrapnel.'
Ever notice that most pressure vessels have hemispherical shaped heads and round shells: http://www.efunda.com/formulae/solid_mechanics/mat_mechanics/pressure_vessel.cfm
http://physics.uwstout.edu/Statstr/Strength/Columns/cols75.htm

The calculation you should be worried about is the calculation for the stored energy of air in a compressor "tank" (Dan Crowl Formula).

E=P1*V*(ln(P1/P2)),
E=Energy in kJ
P1=Contained pressure, Absolute, kPaa.
P2=Atmospheric pressure, Absolute, kPaa.
V=Volume, Cubic metres.

So if we take a standard 60 gallon, 2 stage compressor with 150psi in it you get:

E=1135*.227*(ln(1135/101))
E=623kJ which is equal to just under a 1/3 pound of TNT...
 
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