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Wicked Raciest !
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How in the hell do you weld body sheet metal? I have a Lincoln SP 170 welder, with .025 wire, co/argon gas. I am trying to weld 20 ga. Body sheet metal on my Toyota. If I set, it on A-3.5 wire speed, I get a cold weld, and if I set it on B-4.0-4.5 wire speed, I blow holes in it. WTF am I doing wrong!!!!!!! HELP!!!!!!:confused:
 

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It takes a little practice to get used to, are you spot welding or running stringers? Play with your stickout as well - tighten up on A-3.5 or pull back on B-4.0.
 

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I have a 130A cebora. Set it on 2, turn down the wire speed and move about 2 inches a second or as fast as possible. This is a small section I did in the bed of my junk:

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I hate that about my 170, not being able to fine tune the amps. I'd say tighten up with the A-3.5 or even give a little less wire, down to 3 or even 2.5. This will allow the puddle to heat up a bit but not enough to blow through. Also, like others have said, it takes practice, the thick stuff is cake and very forgiving, it's the thin stuff that takes skill :flipoff2:
 

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i use something b/w 35 and 40 on a Hobart 135. about 15 cfm of gas also. Lower seemed to work a little better. Months of practice really helps too. you set the voltage on the lowest setting too. the trick is to get it there and burn really quick, but then pull away really quick too. It works best to tack weld at the center of each side then keep going around in the same pattern tack welding right beside the old ones. The cooling is good. These aren't structural welds, they're just needed to get through the sheet you're adding. btw, body sheet is 16ga for most autos. That makes it A LOT easier. I used 20 also though b/c it was free. :D
 

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If you can get to the backside of whatever you're welding...use a piece of copper, brass, or bronze as a heat sink. Something about the size of a 2 lb mallet head works good. I don't know what your situation is, but this "trick" worked for me when I butt welded panels on mine. Works good filling in holes too, like all the old pop rivet holes around my fender openings.
 

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If you can do overlaps, there is a two part adhesive made by SEM that the manufacturers use to install panels. It is as strong or stronger than welding and you get no heat warping. While it isn't horribly cheap, it is so damn much easier that I routinely use it. I have hit across a glued section and the metal tore across the glue, instead of the glue giving up. On a rig that is going to get a lot of flexing, metal fatigue may cause cracking at a weld line, whereas the glue will hold up better.

I use a panel flanger to make the panels lie flat. You can get them from Eastwood or possibly Harbor Freight for a reasonable amount. They work well even for welding, especially spot welding.

Some auto paint stores will loan you the applicator, otherwise the applicator runs around $50. The tubes of glue run around $20-$30 depending on the type. A tube goes a LONG way.

LOL
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 · (Edited)
Thanks!!! I will work on it tomorrow
btw, body sheet is 16ga for most autos.
According to my gage the Toyota metal is 20 ga. I remember welding up a tear in the body of my brothers 50 Olds, and I did that with an 1/8 rod in a stick welder with no blow through, I swear those fenders were 1/8 thick!!!!!!:D
 

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When i put 18 guage steel on last years rig.....I ran the bead along the tubing, and then swiped it into the sheet metal....focusing mainly on the tubing..

I rollled that thing many times and hammered the hell out of it, and never ever had a problem!

I have a Lincoln power mig 200...and i put mine on B and wire speed down to about 200.....it works perfect:D

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OOP'S said:
According to my gage the Toyota metal is 20 ga.
And that's the main reason that on the east coast there is so many Toy's with swiss cheese bodies and Chevies and Ford's are a bit more complete :) Toy from the factory just uses thinner metal, my Chevy was cake to weld on but the Toy takes a bit more finess.
 

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oh yeah, forgot about the heat sink thing too. I held a hammer head right next to where I was welding, or like said before, put a piece of 1/8 inch copper behind where I was if I could. That really helped the burn through.
 

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diff wire

I was given a 1lb roll of wire as a test that is supposed to weld 14ga to 24ga steel. It's .030 "twenty guage brand" wire, ask at your local weld shop if they've heard of it, I did my bed bob with it and it seems to work better that reg wire for thin stuff. just play with it. :D
 

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The trick I use is I bought some 3/8 inch rod and I tack it around the areathat is getting a patch. Then I cut the patch, tack it in place and then I concentrate the weld on the 3/8 rod while letting the pool bring in the patch plate. It's stronger then all heck, gives extra support to the area, holds the piece nicely and doesn't cost much for the steel rod. This allows me to turn up the heat because the rod can take more than the sheet can, real easy beads. Hope that helps, it works for me.
 
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