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Discussion Starter #1
Ok, so I have noticed in a lot of pictures that people are welding on their frames vertically. Now in a welding book I have it specifically says not to weld vertically on a C channel frame. Horizontally is fine. So what i need to know is if the book's rule pertains to the 40's semi boxed frame. I'd hate to lay some verticle beads and then have the frame crack on the trail because of it.

So lets get this straightened out.


Also are the cruiser frames heat treated or not because that would be an issue to consider when welding.
 

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if they were gonna crack, mine would have years ago...and it's getting more welding this weekend.

weld away.
 

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Old Rock Doc
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This is a better way to do it. Make your welds diagonal rather than vertical. In addition to avoiding the vertical welds the diagonal ones provide more weld length & strength.
 

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I have seen Medusa`s pictures of welds and he has the right idea.

By curving the metal and mot making a strait line you reduce the possible fracture to either side of the weld, because we all know it generally does not crack on the weld.

Rob
 

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Medusa said:
Another good example -- this one by ButchBuilt:D

what are the cross sleves for:confused:
 

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Old Rock Doc
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The lower two bolts for the standard Saginaw power steering box. The frame is actually upside down in that picture.
 

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Sure beats welding on your back and having slag run down your arm, you should see me dance when that happens!!!

Nothing worse than repairing these old rusted out frames up here, when you hit any impurities the wire starts spitting. So we grind and grind then head the metal to clean it.

Best option is sand blast.

Rob
 

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The myth that you should not weld on frames comes from big rigs that have tempered steel frames that should not be welded on. They usually have big stickers on them that say not to. Perhaps it is on them where welds can be horizontal. If you weld on tempered steel it's going to break when stressed because the heat affected zone around the weldment is going to make a big weak spot where the tempering has been lost. Not a factor on your Cruiser or any other light truck frame.


Like someone else said, weld away. The frames have welds on them from the factory.

I really like the football shaped patch on the butch frame. If you look at back hoes, that is exactly how they reinforce the boom. With a large elongated football shaped patch.

-Stumbaugh
 

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I seem to recall two thicknesses of metal, one just over an 1/8 th and the other 3/16's.

I seem to recall the 3/16's being the most common and the 1/8
being the thinner sections.

It's been a while since I did any frame work, so you might want to double check.

Stumbaugh
 

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Old Rock Doc
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The question that was asked was not whether or not you should weld on Cruiser frames, but whether or not those welds should include vertical runs. Of course, you should not weld on tempered truck frames:rolleyes: . Diagonal or the "football -shaped"plates are done to avoid making vertical welds that have a greater tendency to crack with later flexing of the frame.
 

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Medusa said:
The question that was asked was not whether or not you should weld on Cruiser frames, but whether or not those welds should include vertical runs. Of course, you should not weld on tempered truck frames:rolleyes: . Diagonal or the "football -shaped" scab plates are done to avoid making vertical welds that have a greater tendency to crack with upon later flexing of the frame.
Easy there big fellah, just trying to give him some back ground info...;)

-Stumbaugh
 

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fj40's have mild steel frames and are hot riveted. a hot riveted frame has better flex characteristics than a welded frame so you see a lot of cracked jeep frames. while there is some pretty minimal welding done at the factory i do not believe you will find vertical welds. i have seen a few frames developing cracks due to improper welding (vertical). a mild steel frame is very forgiving and you would very possibly have no problems but it is still not a great idea. it also depends on what part of the frame you weld on also. between the front and rear spring mounts is an area i would try to avoid the vertical welds especcially as it tends to be stressed more and that is where i have seen the cracks starting. jack is right on about the tapered ends on the reinforcing plate. a crack usually appears beside the weld and trys to follow that line. never put a scab plate on. put reinforcment plates on. scabs fall off. little welder humor there. this statement is my opinion based on my 45 years of experience and knowlege and may differ from your own. but that doesnt mean i'm right and you are wrong either. the picture is a frame that i reinforced when i put power steering on it to avoid cracking the frame and crossmember.
butch
 

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Discussion Starter #16
ok great info. I've been at work and school all day. So now I can weld on the frame with no worries now. I really like that diagonal and footbal technique, that will definatly be put to use.
 

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Butch there are some vertical welds not a whole lot but some. Ironically enough what I would consider some of the more important ones, motor mounts, and tranny mounts on early cruisers before the days of the crossmember :) Surprizing how thin the OEM motor mounts are too, maybe and 1/8"?
 

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as long as there was no undercut why would a vertical weld be of any concern or more crack prone than any other????????????????
 
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