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Discussion Starter #1
My main welder is a 15 year old Lincoln Powermig 255. The thinnest I usually weld is 1/8 inch and always have used .035. I may have some sheet metal work coming up so looking to get thinner wire. I haven't welded sheet metal in 20 years and hated it back then. My machine gives me tables for 030 and 025 down to 22 gauge. What wire size and type are you guys using for the thin stuff?
 

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Get Off My Lawn
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.023 and a little 110v suitcase welder.

My big 255 mig won't run a clean arch at lower settings. The small 110 machine does a much better job at welding thin metal.
 

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Snooty Poser
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.023 and a little 110v suitcase welder.

My big 255 mig won't run a clean arch at lower settings. The small 110 machine does a much better job at welding thin metal.
My mom's boyfriend does the same. He's a 79 year old retired boilermaker with three 250's, but he uses his 141 almost exclusively on sheet metal. He's replacing floor pans on a Studebaker right now.
 

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blatant asshole
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Mines a homedepot 140 lincoln. And i run it on b/c heat @ 1.25-1.5 speed.

I know that doesnt help translate to other machines because not actual #s but its pretty low and slow.
 

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Get Off My Lawn
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My mom's boyfriend does the same. He's a 79 year old retired boilermaker with three 250's, but he uses his 141 almost exclusively on sheet metal. He's replacing floor pans on a Studebaker right now.
One of my friends just bought a restoration project this past weekend. He needs to do a bunch of floor pan and rocker work. I talked him into the Klutch 140 from northern tool. It was $259 yesterday, he told me.

Can't beat that.
 

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If at all possible, clamp aluminum angle to both pieces to keep them from warping and to try to draw heat out of the metal.
 

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Snooty Poser
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One of my friends just bought a restoration project this past weekend. He needs to do a bunch of floor pan and rocker work. I talked him into the Klutch 140 from northern tool. It was $259 yesterday, he told me.

Can't beat that.
That's what I bought, about the same price. My kid effed up where the gas hose hooks into the welder, and the regulator is cheap, but I've run a dozen or so 10 pound spools through it. I usually use 0.030, but have both 0.025 and 0.035 wire. It's a little sensitive to wire size, but it can do a good job.
 

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I took a coachworks class, at one time in my life, and they swear by Oxygen /Acetylene for sheet metal.

They taught that trying to wheel (english wheel) a mig welded panel was impossible. and they had some other issue with TIGed metal, but the issue with TIG escapes me. (but they weren't as opposed to it as MIG)

Now typical auto body work, is a different story than coachwork.
 

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I bought a Hobart 140 from TSC for like $500 and I love it for thinner metals.

My BetaMig 251 would never weld right on the lower settings.
 

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buy the smaller wire, use a backing strip if you can so that it is twice as thick and/or use a heat sink.

I've done had good luck with zap....zap....zap....zap stuff to fix holes and cracks and such in cars. just a matter of going slow, lower heat, fast enough wire.
 

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My big 255 mig won't run a clean arch at lower settings.
a bigger welder will generally be running a big reactor coil for arc stabilization, that requires current flow within an optimal range for it to smooth the ripple in the rectified output

cheapo little disposamig welders generally run a capacitor instead (or in addition to) a small reactor coil, the capacitor doesn't require any current flow to smooth the output, meaning your tacks are burning smoother quicker.

to the OP: another vote for 023/024/025 or whatever and 75/25 gas rather than straight co2
 

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Broke Bastard
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One of my friends just bought a restoration project this past weekend. He needs to do a bunch of floor pan and rocker work. I talked him into the Klutch 140 from northern tool. It was $259 yesterday, he told me.

Can't beat that.
What is the deal on klutch welders? Are they made my someone else? Are they their own brand/manufacturer? Can you get parts for them? How long have they been around?

I am looking for a dual voltage inverter wirefeed. I want a lighter weight setup for mobile work. My Hobart 175 is to heavy.
 

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anyone every used Si/Bronze wire for body panels? More like brazing I would guess?
First time I ever heard of this was on an IG post last night by kanekid.

Yes, it's brazing. Idea is that brazing is more than strong enough for body panels structurally, and brazing requires less heat than welding, which will help reduce the tendency for panels to warp.

No clue if that works long term.
 

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also brazing is softer and doesn't work harden the way that welded steel does
 

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Discussion Starter #17
Brazing sounds interesting but web search said I need pure Argon it will be a while before I can fill an empty tank with it. Ill probably give 023 a shot in the meantime.
 

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First time I ever heard of this was on an IG post last night by kanekid.

Yes, it's brazing. Idea is that brazing is more than strong enough for body panels structurally, and brazing requires less heat than welding, which will help reduce the tendency for panels to warp.

No clue if that works long term.
Some Triumph Spitfire sheet metal unions were brazed from the factory. It used to be just the thing to use where you couldn't get the spot welder tongs into.
 

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What is the deal on klutch welders? Are they made my someone else? Are they their own brand/manufacturer? Can you get parts for them? How long have they been around?

I am looking for a dual voltage inverter wirefeed. I want a lighter weight setup for mobile work. My Hobart 175 is to heavy.
From what I read, they are reliable units in general, folks on the welding forums that have them seem to like them. As far as I know "Klutch" is the house-brand for Northern Tool, so they are likely made over-seas by someone else. For parts, you have to contact the Northern Tool parts department. So you have to make sure you can get what you need like drive rollers for solid and/or knurled rollers for flux core wire before-hand.
 

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Snooty Poser
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From what I read, they are reliable units in general, folks on the welding forums that have them seem to like them. As far as I know "Klutch" is the house-brand for Northern Tool, so they are likely made over-seas by someone else. For parts, you have to contact the Northern Tool parts department. So you have to make sure you can get what you need like drive rollers for solid and/or knurled rollers for flux core wire before-hand.
I called about a new gun, you can get one through Northern tool. Turns out cleaning grit out of the trigger fixed it. Mine didn't come with a knurled roller, but the smooth one flips for 0.025 wire. I have always used gas with mine. It's an inverter welder, better than what Hazard Fraught had at the time. Mine is about 6 years old, been beat on by my now 22 year old son and his friends for most of that time. My wife gets pissed when she comes home and a shitheep sami is in her spot in the garage with sparks flying under it. It works just fine on a 100' extension cord, too.
 
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