Pirate 4x4 banner

21 - 40 of 41 Posts

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
226 Posts
I use .030 as my go2 on 18ga sheet all the way to 1/4 with 75/25 .
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
3,591 Posts
Biggest thing I've found is gap & warping - if you can get it to have no gap and stay that way it's not that bad, but as soon as you get more than about 0.025" gap it's going to be a sob to keep from getting an ugly bead no matter what. And it warps super easy, so even if you start with good fit up, it's going to be hard to keep the joint that way for the entire weld.
 

·
Get Off My Lawn
Joined
·
13,172 Posts
What is the deal on klutch welders? Are they made my someone else? Are they their own brand/manufacturer? Can you get parts for them? How long have they been around?

I am looking for a dual voltage inverter wirefeed. I want a lighter weight setup for mobile work. My Hobart 175 is to heavy.
I did a bunch of research on buying a little 110v welder recently. These came up and apparently they're great. I actually found nothing but good things about Klutch. I had initially heard about them when I was shopping a 210+ machine. Their 250S looks pretty sweet for the price.

Mainly it's my experience with northern. They have a really good parts counter system at their physical stores. We have one local. It's made owning equipment sold by them very easy and honestly, they put my LWS to shame in that respect.

So it really just comes down to my opinion being: It's the best budget minded option for a guy at home if he has a Northern near him.
 

·
Broke Bastard
Joined
·
4,117 Posts
I did a bunch of research on buying a little 110v welder recently. These came up and apparently they're great. I actually found nothing but good things about Klutch. I had initially heard about them when I was shopping a 210+ machine. Their 250S looks pretty sweet for the price.

Mainly it's my experience with northern. They have a really good parts counter system at their physical stores. We have one local. It's made owning equipment sold by them very easy and honestly, they put my LWS to shame in that respect.

So it really just comes down to my opinion being: It's the best budget minded option for a guy at home if he has a Northern near him.

Good to know. Thanks. I don't have a northern tool near me though

I wish I could swing a Miller 211. 5x the price kinda sucks
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
3,610 Posts
I did a bunch of research on buying a little 110v welder recently. These came up and apparently they're great. I actually found nothing but good things about Klutch. I had initially heard about them when I was shopping a 210+ machine. Their 250S looks pretty sweet for the price.

Mainly it's my experience with northern. They have a really good parts counter system at their physical stores. We have one local. It's made owning equipment sold by them very easy and honestly, they put my LWS to shame in that respect.

So it really just comes down to my opinion being: It's the best budget minded option for a guy at home if he has a Northern near him.
I agree here with one caveat, pretty much all the 120v welders use the same cheap Chinese parts inside and are basically disposable when they break (even the red and blue). In light of this you're probably best off getting the cheapest machine that fits a 10lb spool and then slapping a big fuckin cap and rectifier in it if it's not DC (which it almost certainly won't be if you buy a cheap machine).
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
105 Posts
Had a welding instructor show me to use flux core wire with C25 gas for thin metals. Produced super nice welds.
Haven't done it in years though.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,285 Posts
I need to fill 20 or so screw holes, maybe 3/16" in the rockers and lower panels of a pickup that had old man fiberglass running boards.

Doesn't need to be perfect, just getting a $500 paint job and a for sale sign.

I don't have access to the back side for a piece of copper

I have a big mig with .035 wire, and a little 110v with .030 flux.

I have a couple welding rods I was thinking of using as filler, redneck tig

I could also plug them with bondo worms

Suggestions?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
12,268 Posts
I need to fill 20 or so screw holes, maybe 3/16" in the rockers and lower panels of a pickup that had old man fiberglass running boards.

Doesn't need to be perfect, just getting a $500 paint job and a for sale sign.

I don't have access to the back side for a piece of copper

I have a big mig with .035 wire, and a little 110v with .030 flux.

I have a couple welding rods I was thinking of using as filler, redneck tig

I could also plug them with bondo worms

Suggestions?
Button head allens :flipoff2:

What kinda truck? Toyota tin can thickness or older full size? Toyota thickness is tricky. Can you put your regulator and bottle on the 110v and get some 023?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6 Posts
I need to fill 20 or so screw holes, maybe 3/16" in the rockers and lower panels of a pickup that had old man fiberglass running boards.



Doesn't need to be perfect, just getting a $500 paint job and a for sale sign.



I don't have access to the back side for a piece of copper



I have a big mig with .035 wire, and a little 110v with .030 flux.



I have a couple welding rods I was thinking of using as filler, redneck tig



I could also plug them with bondo worms



Suggestions?
Nails can work well for this. Place head in hole. Spray some weld around. Cut/grind it smooth.

Sent from my SM-G965U using Tapatalk
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,285 Posts
Button head allens :flipoff2:

What kinda truck? Toyota tin can thickness or older full size? Toyota thickness is tricky. Can you put your regulator and bottle on the 110v and get some 023?
Maybe, but I'd still need filler metal right?

Nails can work well for this. Place head in hole. Spray some weld around. Cut/grind it smooth.

Sent from my SM-G965U using Tapatalk
This is a pretty damn good idea
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8,891 Posts
How about rubber/plastic plugs?

No welding or painting. Just For Sale As IS and move on with your life.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
29,409 Posts
Brazing sounds interesting but web search said I need pure Argon it will be a while before I can fill an empty tank with it. Ill probably give 023 a shot in the meantime.
:confused:

braze with an oxy-fuel rig and flux. low heat, softer stuff.


I can't think of a good reason to tig weld with the nickle bronze stuff. seems like a pricey adventure and the electric heat is still pretty high. it does flow nice though
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
29,409 Posts
I need to fill 20 or so screw holes, maybe 3/16" in the rockers and lower panels of a pickup that had old man fiberglass running boards.

Doesn't need to be perfect, just getting a $500 paint job and a for sale sign.

I don't have access to the back side for a piece of copper

I have a big mig with .035 wire, and a little 110v with .030 flux.

I have a couple welding rods I was thinking of using as filler, redneck tig

I could also plug them with bondo worms

Suggestions?
bondo worms would be the easiest thing.

i'd do that, and have done similar, with 0.030 flux core. go slow, seems like about half a loop is the max in one pull. just take your time and work around, eventually it will fill in the hole, sand it back down as you see fit
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,469 Posts
I need to fill 20 or so screw holes, maybe 3/16"
Small flat washers with an aluminum pop rivet in the center hole to have something to hold it in place while you tack it. Don't install the rivet, just use it to hold the washer in place. Tack it, remove the rivet and fill the center hole.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
2,459 Posts
Another believer in 110 for thin metal. Auto body shop says only 110. My miller 218 or something could never do the thin stuff on 200Volt. I bought the convertible 110/220 unit and never looked back.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
951 Posts
I've had no problems doing down to 18ga with my Hobart Ironman 210 with .023 solid wire. Haven't had a need to do thinner than that.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
17 Posts
buy the smaller wire, use a backing strip if you can so that it is twice as thick and/or use a heat sink.

I've done had good luck with zap....zap....zap....zap stuff to fix holes and cracks and such in cars. just a matter of going slow, lower heat, fast enough wire.
What is the best material to use when it is used as a heat sink?

Copper, brass or aluminum? something else? Thicker is better?

My 1985 CJ-7 has duplicate holes drill in the tub that I want to weld up in the future, when I pull the tub off and go through everything with a fine toothed comb. Apparently it had two different soft tops installed in its previous life.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
29,409 Posts
yes, copper/brass would be better than aluminium, but AL works also. thicker is better until it won't fit where you need it to. even 1/8" would be helpful for doing 18 or 20 gauge.

I've used 1" steel as a backer for 1/8" steel before. kind of depends on the setup but the idea is that you are welding on low enough amps that you aren't going to appreciably bond to the backer. copper is dis-similar so it naturally doesn't want to bond to steel, just so long as it is thick enough that it can dissipate the heat
 
21 - 40 of 41 Posts
Top