Pirate 4x4 banner
1 - 3 of 3 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
13 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Looking to build a tube bumper. I am looking for what thickness of tubing I should look for. Here is what it will be used for:

1: Primarily used for protection. I have a few designs, but mostly a standard two tube bumper. (Probably 3" o.d.)

2: Will be mounting a winch and 2 working lights.

3: Will be built as an airtank for my OBA. I am looking at a electric model (still to be determined as to what model).

4: This is going on a 90 Wrangler. May not mean much, but that is info.

I have thought about just mounting a tank and buying a bumper, but why in the hell spend $200 on a bumper and whatever a tank is going to cost me when I have access to "company purchased" material for free. I work in a metal shop, so welding, grinding, and making a perfect fit is not a problem.

In the end, I will probably have it powder coated if that will also make a difference.

The length of the bumper will be between 40 and 45 inches long, and both tubes will be connected to each other (still to be determined how. So if someone has an idea, let me know.) I thought about using two connections between the two tubes using 3 inch tubing also.

Well, hell, I hope that covers it all for anyone wanting to give some inside info.

If not, I check this regularly as this is the best place for info.

(Yes, I also checked the site for info on this, just did not find anything useful....)

In the mean time, keep the rubber side down! :bounce:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
130 Posts
on my bumper i used 1/4 inch thick tubing, that seems to be the norm if 3/16 isn't used. as far as hooking the 2 tubes together why not use some one inch tubing and cut a hole in each tube then weld the joints. i would also put the outlet for the tank in a place that is protected from rocks and what not.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
13 Posts
Discussion Starter · #3 ·
1/4 would work, I have tons of that around, just thought it was overkill. But, I guess for protection against rocks and my wifes truck, that would be best (dont ask about the wifes truck thing....)

I plan to hide the tubing in the frame rails, I am only having a problem on exactly how to get around that round tube right up front. I am thinking about making a channel below it as I am planning to install a winch.

Also, what about an outlet for the air in the rear of the vehicle. I plan on carrying a small amout of air hose and tools (basically an air nozzle, but also like a die grinder, butterfly wrench, and an impact wrench.) The storage for those tools is easy to do, just the connection for the hose in the rear.

I guess since I am going that far, might as well make the rear bumper and have the connections hidden in that...hhmmm...

Speaking of that, what diameter tubing should I run to make the connection in the rear if I am planning on running air tools...or maybe I just ought ot carry more hose. Just thought it would be easier if someone behind me on the trail needed what I have for tools, at least the air.

For those that are looking for a place to store the hose, I am using a section of PVC (yeah, plastic) big enough to hold my coil hose and mounting it on the angled portion of the sport cage. Figured that was an easy place to store it so that it was not in the way.

As for the 1" tubing holding it together, I wanted a bit more holding the two pieces of tubing together. Reason, if a bead breaks, there goes my air pressure. The more connection I have, the stronger it will hold. I may go 2", but any less and that is cutting down on sturdiness.
 
1 - 3 of 3 Posts
Top