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Perhaps a large part of the issue is caused by every MBA program on earth convincing their soon-to-be grads that they will walk on water, and some company might be lucky enough for them to bestow their new 'knowledge' upon them thus instantly transforming the entire landscape of the corporate world upon their graduation??? :laughing:

Seriously, Congrats on making it through the program while holding down a job, but is there a rather significant sub-section of the courses on advanced level Ego inflation and self-agrandizment??

Or is it just coincidental that a large portion of mid-life MBA grads seem to believe their dick drags on the ground upon completion of a couple years of additional training in a masters program... :confused:


Another possible contributing factor: The guys in the new company will never know the guy wih the MBA/ MSA suffix on his email sig wasn't always this much of a cocky/smug prick. The coworkers/ bosses at the old job will remember the contrast between the before & after and have to deal with that irritation, and thus will pay less for the privilege of their benevolent presence in the workplace. .


eta: sure, from a business perspective it makes sense for the universities to try and sell the value of their fees they charge for these programs, but the rate of people going all in on the kool-aid is impressive.
 

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I always assume it's because they can get most anyone to do a job and get 70-80% of what they need. The extra 20-30% is nice but not needed and often they cost to get that extra isn't worth it.

Just like design stuff. 80% seems to be the good enough point.
 

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If they actually live and believe that they are not going hire anyone smarter than them....you need to find another job anyhow....case closed
 

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If they actually live and believe that they are not going hire anyone smarter than them....you need to find another job anyhow....case closed
:laughing:

This is since I was hired in 2003. Could be my fault - I'm a bit of a challenge, but the most productive. Probably for the same reason. They don't like thinkers.
 

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There is a big mental step that is taken when you begin to look elsewhere. By the time an employee has taken the time to search and look elsewhere they have accepted that they are not valued in their current company and have begun looking for greener pastures. This is not about salary and compensation but emotional satisfaction. When a competitive counteroffer is provided and accepted the employee is rarely retained for the long term.

You have already mentally left your current company so decide where you want to move.
 

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I always assume it's because they can get most anyone to do a job and get 70-80% of what they need. The extra 20-30% is nice but not needed and often they cost to get that extra isn't worth it.

Just like design stuff. 80% seems to be the good enough point.
Just remember when they want 99.999% uptime 80% is good enough. :laughing:
 

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Most companies are top heavy. The company I work for, (mfg of construction components), is super lean. There is the owner, who owns the buildings, the machinery, the land under the buildings, the inventory, the packaging...IOW, he doesn't owe anyone shit, no banks, no shareholders, partners, nothing.

Then there is my boss, then me and I don't supervise anyone. So that's the structure, absolute minimalist, do your job and you'll get good compensation, or if you don't you'll get replaced, as it should be. Most modern corps are bleeding off the profits to so many people that don't really add anything, that nobody can really make any good money. They set up unrealistic and sometimes indecipherable bonus plans, and with equity groups they don't GAF about anything except documentable EBITA, so they can flip the company.
All bs aside, does your company have a need to transport those components?
 

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Discussion Starter #91
except that you started this thread with the complaint that you just got your masters and aren't being recognized for it... You've equated getting a grad degree with being the best and brightest... and you're making a massive assumption that your leadership is likely very keenly aware of (that's one reason they are them, and you are you.)

If you can do better, go do better. If you are smarter than your leadership, then turn your side hustle into a company and prove everyone wrong.
No I didn't. In fact just the opposite. I started this thread by saying I am actually getting a lot of recognition for it. Just not from the company that you would think would be the easiest for me to get recognition from. I never once equated getting a degree to being the best and brightest. You made that leap all on your own.

My side hustle is a company fully licensed and everything. I pay taxes as a company. The problem is that it is very difficult to scale in a booming market and I want to move out of the area so it will be unloaded.

Perhaps a large part of the issue is caused by every MBA program on earth convincing their soon-to-be grads that they will walk on water, and some company might be lucky enough for them to bestow their new 'knowledge' upon them thus instantly transforming the entire landscape of the corporate world upon their graduation??? :laughing:

Seriously, Congrats on making it through the program while holding down a job, but is there a rather significant sub-section of the courses on advanced level Ego inflation and self-agrandizment??

Or is it just coincidental that a large portion of mid-life MBA grads seem to believe their dick drags on the ground upon completion of a couple years of additional training in a masters program... :confused:


Another possible contributing factor: The guys in the new company will never know the guy wih the MBA/ MSA suffix on his email sig wasn't always this much of a cocky/smug prick. The coworkers/ bosses at the old job will remember the contrast between the before & after and have to deal with that irritation, and thus will pay less for the privilege of their benevolent presence in the workplace. .


eta: sure, from a business perspective it makes sense for the universities to try and sell the value of their fees they charge for these programs, but the rate of people going all in on the kool-aid is impressive.
Ironic for you to be calling me a prick...

Once again for all those clearly not reading and simply piling on, the degree is only important to this story in that it has given me access to a large recruiting network and has opened my eyes to something that I feel is an issue in corporate America. I personally am not even important to the issue that I created this thread to talk about. I was a hard worker before school and I will be a hard worker after school is done. Take me out of this and the issues still stands. Multiple people have recounted their stories with the exact same thing. Kudos on your keyboard kommando attitude though!
 

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Discussion Starter #92
Just a thought... if you sound this cocky at work, they might not think you’re as awesome, the best,
Again, I am not cocky at work. Hell, I haven't even been cocky here by PBB standards. That being said, while I have NEVER said that I am the best at work, both my big boss and his boss have said it numerous times directly to me. Are they blowing smoke up my ass? Who the hell knows. It doesn't matter anyways because back to the very point of this thread, actions speak louder than words.
 

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All good points. I promise you I am the very best of the best but I understand your scepticism. You don't know me. Also, to be absolutely fair to my company, they probably will give me the job and title I want because I am the best. The problem is they should be moving fast to lock me in and they just aren't. By the time they get off their butt, I will likely have had to accept an offer from another company and they will have lost me. I would need something in writing to be able to turn down an offer that will be in writing.
ahem
 

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No I didn't. In fact just the opposite. I never once equated getting a degree to being the best and brightest. You made that leap all on your own.
The problem? Where the hell is my current employer in all this? I made it clear to them up front that they would be my number one option after graduation if they gave me the promotion I would like. I wasn't kidding with them either. I know the business inside and out, I know the corporate culture, and I have been a model employee for 16 years. Far from them making an effort to keep me on, it almost seems as though they are making an effort to push me out the door. This is a Fortune 500 company. They have all the resources in the world to make me happy. I am easily the most qualified person in the company for the role I want and could really make a positive impact, yet I don't hear a thing.

I see this same thing over and over. My school advertises that something like 98.5% of graduates will get promoted or take a new job between the start of the program and 3 months after graduation. I think this is likely true but the number of people staying with their current company seems to be an extremely small number. In fact, for the people staying with their companies it seems that most are doing so because that company footed all or a good portion of the bill for grad school and they would have to pay it back if they leave. Even in those cases the people still plan to leave when that time is up because instead of getting a promotion to try to keep these driven individuals that tried to better themselves, the company will use this strangle hold they have to not promote these people and try to wring every last bit of productivity out of them while they are being held captive. That doesn't seem like the best way to go about this. Why pay for school if you don't plan to utilize the employee in the future? Most companies seem to structure it so you almost always come out better if you jump ship.

When I started this little education adventure I figured the chances were very good that I would stay with my company. Now as it moves closer to the time where I will be getting offers, it seems like the chances are extremely slim. It seems sad that I have to start over somewhere else to get what I am worth.

Anyways, that is my little rant. I am sure there are exceptions out there but from where I stand it looks like they are extremely rare. It just seems like corporate America could do better.
Yeah... "just the opposite.." :rolleyes:
 

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One more thing to consider: If you’re “irreplaceable” you’re unpromotable.

Make sure you are training those around you to succeed as well. Sure, you run the risk of one of your peers (or subordinates) getting the promotion, but you also show leadership, the willingness to be a team player, and should you get the promotion, you have a good replacement already.
 

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Discussion Starter #98
One more thing to consider: If you’re “irreplaceable” you’re unpromotable.

Make sure you are training those around you to succeed as well. Sure, you run the risk of one of your peers (or subordinates) getting the promotion, but you also show leadership, the willingness to be a team player, and should you get the promotion, you have a good replacement already.
I am not irreplaceable by any means. I end up training a lot of the new guys and I make sure they are very well trained. Everyone I work with (well maybe not *everyone*) has the ability to hang with me I think. They just choose not to. It is more of a work ethic thing and not me being God's gift to my job. I believe if you are going to do a job do it right and I stick to that. Not everyone was raised that way.
 

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...

Ironic for you to be calling me a prick...

Once again for all those clearly not reading and simply piling on, the degree is only important to this story in that it has given me access to a large recruiting network and has opened my eyes to something that I feel is an issue in corporate America. I personally am not even important to the issue that I created this thread to talk about. I was a hard worker before school and I will be a hard worker after school is done. Take me out of this and the issues still stands. Multiple people have recounted their stories with the exact same thing. Kudos on your keyboard kommando attitude though!
Lighten up sally, I never called you anything; just shared a general observation about a group of people, whom you have the potential to become.


... Although a little self eval/ inventory may be in order Since in your own description, your current employer is 'Far from making an effort' to capitalize on the offer you have 'made clearly to be your first choice' of parties to have the opportunity to give you a promotion and pay bump. ( and 'you weren't kidding either!' ) , But yet it seems like they have chosen not to use much of the 'all the resources in the world' to have the opportunity to 'make you happy' by giving you the job that you're 'easily the most qualified person in the company for' so that you can 'have a positive impact' and 'Showcase your new & improved value'.


I'm not sure how I got the impression that an ego-check may be in order. :rolleyes: :flipoff2:
 

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Perhaps a large part of the issue is caused by every MBA program on earth convincing their soon-to-be grads that they will walk on water, and some company might be lucky enough for them to bestow their new 'knowledge' upon them thus instantly transforming the entire landscape of the corporate world upon their graduation??? :laughing:

Seriously, Congrats on making it through the program while holding down a job, but is there a rather significant sub-section of the courses on advanced level Ego inflation and self-agrandizment??

Or is it just coincidental that a large portion of mid-life MBA grads seem to believe their dick drags on the ground upon completion of a couple years of additional training in a masters program... :confused:


Another possible contributing factor: The guys in the new company will never know the guy wih the MBA/ MSA suffix on his email sig wasn't always this much of a cocky/smug prick. The coworkers/ bosses at the old job will remember the contrast between the before & after and have to deal with that irritation, and thus will pay less for the privilege of their benevolent presence in the workplace. .


eta: sure, from a business perspective it makes sense for the universities to try and sell the value of their fees they charge for these programs, but the rate of people going all in on the kool-aid is impressive.
I don't know the OP, but holy fuck this is funny and spot on for 95% of the MBAs I have ever met!
 
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